Revelation 1 – Seeing Jesus

Read Revelation 1

John begins his writing by orienting his readers to what is happening and the purpose of his writing.  The whole of this book is a revelation from God that is given to John to make known that which will take place soon.  Remember that we talked in 2 Peter about the dimensions of time when it comes to God’s actions and history.  In fact, all of what “is going to take place” is a New Testament reference to the Old Testament phrase “in the last days.”  This is a phrase that is often used by the prophets to talk about the time when the Messiah would come which means that, since Jesus came to earth, we are in those “last days”.

As he begins his writing, John also directs this letter to the “Seven churches” in the province of Asia.  Each of these churches is specific, however, the meaning of the number seven in Scripture is also important.  Seven is associated with the number of God, perhaps meaning that this letter, while given specific destinations, is also directed to God’s Church, the Universal Church made up of all those who put their faith in Him throughout all time.  Further evidence of this would be the introduction of God as being both “Alpha and Omega.”  Both would seem to indicate that the scope of this letter is much greater than simply seven churches at one point in time.

1bc068bd89998b7e40c90cc47ad06afbThe vision that John has of Jesus is pretty intense and packed with imagery.  These images can seem foreign to us, especially because our study this year has only contained New Testament passages.  However, Jesus is actually revealing Himself in a way that would have been familiar to both John and to readers of God’s Word (which at that time was only the Scripture there was).

John records that he saw 7 golden lampstands.  This may be a reference to the menorah, the lampstand with seven arms that was made for the tabernacle and the temple of God.  He then saw “someone dressed like a son of man.”  Both Daniel and Ezekiel, in their visions, also describe an image of the Messiah in this way.  Isaiah, in his vision of the Lord, sees God dressed in this way, perhaps reflective of the High Priest who also wore such a robe.

The golden sash that Jesus is wearing in this vision is also noted in another vision of Daniel.  A head of white hair suggests wisdom, as referenced in Proverbs; Jesus is often described in the New Testament as the “Wisdom of God.”  His eyes of fire suggest a “penetrating” or “refining” gaze; Daniel again sees this in his visions as well as the feet of glowing bronze.

Ezekiel hears a similar voice in one of his visions.  The rushing water is perhaps a reference to the “living water” that Jesus offers.  Out of His mouth, John writes, came a double-edged sword.  Isaiah makes references to this several times in His writing; the author of Hebrews also makes reference to the Word of the Lord being a double-edged sword.  Jesus is the Divine Word Incarnate (in the flesh).

Jesus then introduces Himself to John who has rightfully fallen down before Him in what was likely a mix of fear, reverence, and worship.  He says to John, “Do not be afraid.”  This too is a normal greeting for a Divine being to give to a human when a revelation is occurring.  There is obvious reason to be afraid, but Jesus reassures John and us that we need not fear because of who He is and what He has done for us.  This greeting becomes, for us, the basis in which we can approach the rest of the book:

“Do not be afraid. I am the First and the Last.  I am the Living One; I was dead, and now look, I am alive for ever and ever!  And I hold the keys of death and Hades.”



Acts 12 – Escape!

Read Acts 12

In that day, when there was a movement that was springing up, rulers often became concerned that it would lead to rebellion against them and were quick to move against them.

So when Peter was arrested as part of Herod’s attempt at putting down the Christian “rebellion,” it meant certain death for Peter.  All the leaders of a movement like this would be hunted down.  Interestingly, this is exactly what the religious leaders were meaning to do all the way back in Acts 5.

Peter’s escape from prison will not be his last, and it is nothing short of a miracle.  Placed in the care of “4 squads” of soldiers, approximately 100 men, Herod was taking no chances that Peter would somehow get sprung from his custody.  Yet it only takes one angel to make this happen.

I find it humorous how this all took place.  Peter is asleep despite the angelic light pouring into his prison cell.  Imagine the angel sighing and whacking him on the side to wake him up.  Even though Peter has just recently experienced a vision from the Lord in Acts 10, he isn’t quite aware of what is going on now, nor does it seem that he believes it.

Eventually he comes to, and then has to deal with the same bewilderment of others whilst standing outside waiting for someone to open the door for him; it was quite a night.

Unlike many of the other movements of that day that were actually against the government, and failed when their leaders were killed, the movement of the Gospel would not be put down.  It could not and cannot be stopped by human effort, nor can its leader be killed.  They already tried that… and it was actually the catalyst that led to where we are now.



Acts 11 – To the Ends of the Earth

Read Acts 11

In the opening of Acts, Jesus tells His followers they would be His witnesses.  He spoke of a series of expanding concentric circles which they would be ministering in.  It only takes us 10 chapters to move out from the center to “the ends of the earth.”  And it only takes us 11 chapters to see resistance from within when it comes to ministering to those on the “outside.”

Yet Peter has no hesitations about his explanation, speaking clearly about the vision God showed him.  Those who heard him were quick to believe too.  I often wonder if we would be so quick to believe Peter if this happened today.

To me, it is interesting how closely this mirrors some contemporary issues that my denomination has and is facing.  While Peter received this message from the Lord, and those who heard him believed this message, it was slow to be implemented throughout the Church at that time.  This has been the case for us as well.  As we have struggled with different issues (women severing in leadership, children at the Lord’s Table, etc.), leaders have seen a clear message from God in Scripture that reveals to us an inclusion and an openness that welcomes God’s people and their gifts.  However, the churches of the denomination have been slow to respond.  Acts 11 shows us that we aren’t the only ones to struggle with this though, to support something verbally while reject it in practice.

This chapter, however, also gives us hope that as the Holy Spirit continues to move through the Church, building her up and molding her into the true bride of Christ, we will see more of this lived out in our actions; a testimony of God’s love and the anointing of the Holy Spirit on all who believe.



Day 264: Amos 1-3; Intro to Amos

As we move into the prophet Amos, we a meet a prophet that was sent to the Northern Kingdom of Israel.  Though Amos was “one of the shepherds of Tekoa,” a city very close to Jerusalem, the Lord sent him into Israel to deliver the message of God to them.  From a chronological standpoint, Amos became a prophet around, but a bit before the prophet Hosea, who was also called and sent to the Northern Kingdom.   Unlike many of the other prophets, there is very little comfort in Amos’ message to the people of Israel; he is pretty much all judgment all the time.  We will see a little section at the end that speaks of restoration, but mostly Amos drives home the point that Judgment is coming, it is coming for specific reasons, and it will all encompassing.

Because today’s reading has a lot to do with the announcement of the Judgment that is to come, something that we have heard many times before, I think it is important once again to talk through the mind of the prophet and look at the specific language that he, and other prophets use in their writing and speaking.  We talked about this on our last day of the book of Ezekiel, but would do well continue to remember this because it is clear that the prophets have a language and a way all their own.  Abraham J. Heschel would say that we have no language in common with the prophets and he wouldn’t be too far from the truth.  Amos, like Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and others speak in sweeping accusations using grandiose language and vivid imagery that is often even questionable for children.  In fact, in many Bible classes for kids of all ages, the prophets tend to be a brushed over group of writings because of their R rated commentary of Israel and Judah.

There is, however, a good reason for this.  Prophets don’t simply use crazy language for attention’s sake, like a CEO in a meetings uses curse words to make a point.  The prophets are speaking from the very mouth of God.  Indeed the prophets hold a very unique office in the Hebrew culture, being those who have one foot in the throne room of God and the other foot in the throne rooms of kings and on the streets of cities.  These prophets are called by God, often times taken up in visions like Daniel and Ezekiel, seeing another side of reality, and going so far touched on the mouth and given words to say like Isaiah and Jeremiah.  They have been called to be a watchman, to bring the Word of the Lord to God’s people and the surrounding nations, but also bring laments of the people before God as well.  He hearing God’s Words, and spending time in God’s presence, they begin to see things as God sees them, with the burning and passionate love that God feels for His people.

So why all of the strong language then?  Why all the judgment?  Why did we spend yet another day reading the announcement of the coming judgments once again?  The answer is, strange as it may seem to us, God’s unrelenting love for His people and creation.  Sin, this corruption of all that God had made good, has caused creation and God’s people to fall and to continue to turn away from Him.  Yet God loves His people and is continually working towards reconciliation and redemption.  Sometimes this means punishing His people though, for the sins they have committed and for their continual denial of Him.

Amos’ words today relate to us a cycle of sinful behavior, continual actions that have cause people to reject God and follow their own will.  The judgment that is coming will break this cycle.  We too, at times, find ourselves in this cycle.  The apostle Paul writes in his letter to the Romans about this:

I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.  And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good.  As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me.  For I know that good itself does not dwell in me, that is, in my sinful nature.  For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out.  For I do not do the good I want to do, but the evil I do not want to do—this I keep on doing.  Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.

God knows that we are stuck in this cycle, unable to help ourselves out of it.  The sin must be punished and the cycle broken for us to escape from it.  For the people of the Old Testament, this was done through sacrifice.  In the death of one there would be life for the other.  For us, the ultimate expression of this is in Jesus Christ.  Paul continues in Romans 8 by saying,

Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.  For what the law was powerless to do because it was weakened by the flesh, God did by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh to be a sin offering. And so he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fully met in us, who do not live according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.

As we continue to read the prophets, keep in mind that the people whom God loves so passionately are continuing to turn away from Him.  What’s worse is that they cannot help themselves out of the pit that they have dug for themselves.  Yet God doesn’t leave them there; there is hope and though these people won’t live to see that day, it has come and the Kingdom of God is here.  God has reconciled His people to Himself through Jesus Christ, and in this time, as we wait for that to be completed, we live according to the Spirit who continues to teach and reprove us, sanctifying us each day, that we may become more and more like Jesus.



Day 258: Daniel 7-9; Daniel's Visions of the Future (Part 1)

Chronologically speaking, this first of the visions of Daniel at the end of his book happens before the incident of the writing on the wall in chapter 5.  The reason that this makes a difference is that we are moving backwards in time to before the Medes and the Persians would have taken over the Babylonian empire, which happened at the end of chapter 5.  As we begin reading chapter 7, we enter into the final part of the book of Daniel in which he writes down his dreams and visions that he has later in his life.   Daniel’s dreams are often seen as bizarre and probably even strike us as strange and incomprehensible.  Some of the things that he is seeing are things that we would wake up from and be thinking about all day because we just didn’t understand the strange images in our head.  In fact, Daniel too didn’t understand all of the things that he saw, and he is often perplexed and troubled over his visions.

Fortunately, in many of these visions, God Himself provides an explanation for Daniel.  Some are similar to the Nebuchadnezzar’s dream of the statue, but more specific in what kingdoms and rulers would come when.  Other dreams, however, seem to be focused on a more distant time, later in history when the “Ancient of Days” appears and judges all the kingdoms of the world and all its people.  Visions such as this are very similar to what we see in the book of revelation with its beautiful and sometimes even scary imagery of the times that are to come.

There are some Christian denominations that have taken these visions of Daniel and combined them with bits and pieces of other parts of the Bible to try to draw together theories and even theologies of what the end times will look like for us on earth.  Some have even placed names and meaning on some of the different images in Daniel’s visions as being specific countries, rulers, and even events in our contemporary context.  In these theologies, much of what Daniel sees is considered to be taken as literal, something that doesn’t seem to be possible all the way through and therefore doesn’t work on a consistent basis.  Its difficult to say, when interpreting the Bible, that some of it is literal and some of it isn’t… however I don’t think that the argument of a literal or symbolic reading of the Bible is Daniel’s point here at all.  Daniel is faithful recording what the Lord is showing him about the future events and telling it to the people of Israel who are lost in exile and displaced and alone in a foreign land.  The message that Daniel has for them?  Hope.

All of Daniel’s visions are centered around the “Ancient of Days” and what he does.  God shows Daniel and others what is to come in the near future.  Earthly kingdoms will change hands; new people will come to power.  In fact, there will be lots of turmoil that goes on from a political standpoint and it appears that the people of Israel will be caught in the middle of it.  I’m sure they weren’t to thrilled to hear this.  However, God shows up in each of these visions as one that is much more powerful than the kingdoms and rulers of men.  In fact, God sits as both the author and the judge of everything that is to come and, though the people of God may suffer for a while and have to deal with difficult life on earth, ultimately everything is under His control and He will bring all things to the resolution He has in mind: Restoration.



Day 241: Ezekiel 10-13; Ezekiel's Vision and the Glory of God

Today I would like to take a bit of a closer look at the vision of Ezekiel in chapter 1 that he sees again in our chapter 10 of our reading today.  This is the second time that Ezekiel sees a vision like this and describes it for us.  These visions, like many of his visions, are full of crazy imagery that seems weird to us.  It almost seems like it is something out of a messed up movie or some B-rates sci-fi, made for T.V. movie or something.  There have been some that claim that these visions of Ezekiel are actually the first recorded sightings of U.F.O’s visiting the planet and this is Ezekiel’s attempt to interpret the advanced technology that he is seeing.

While I highly doubt that Ezekiel saw any U.F.O’s during his time in Babylon, it is very clear that what he is seeing is strange and completely out of the ordinary.  Yet it is also true that when God speaks to us and reveals Himself to us, He does so in means and ways that we are capable of understanding, even if it doesn’t seem like it at first glance.  The people of Israel would have been able to recognize much of this symbolism, though its difficult to ever say that a particular part of any vision like this has a direct one-to-one correlation, especially for people in the 21st century, over 2,000 years removed from this cultural context.

Speaking of context, it is important to remember that Ezekiel is in Babylon when he is seeing these images, one of the exiles from the first wave that was brought over by King Nebuchadnezzar.  In both of Ezekiel’s visions he sees the four creatures and the four wheels.  Lets take a look at these things first.  The four creatures each have four heads with four faces, yet their bodies seem to be like those of a human.  Often times these different faces would be representative of the perfect nature of God.  Each could represent a different aspect of God’s nation like strength, intelligence, and even divinity.  It could also be though that these creatures are representative of the whole of creation in all of its majesty.  In one commentary that I read, there is a comment made about a link between each of these faces and each of the four gospels:

Matthew – The Lion; Matthew represents Christ as the Lion of Judah.

Mark – The Ox; Mark represents Christ as the Servant of God

Luke – The Human; Luke represents Christ as the perfect Human

John – The Eagle; John represents Christ as the Divine Son of God

We’ll talk more about the differences in the gospels in a couple weeks when we get there. It is also important to note that these creatures in Ezekiel’s vision are parallels to the creatures around the throne of God that John sees and records in the book of Revelation.  More to come on this as well in a couple months!

The other prominent thing that Ezekiel sees in both visions is the 4 “wheel within a wheel” apparatuses that are next to the four creatures.  Both times these wheels are covered in eyes and he even describes them as having fire within them.  This is linked heavily to the phrase “wherever the Spirit would go,” pointing towards the ability to go in any direction at any time.  This would have been contrasted with the vehicular transport of the time, mainly horse and chariot, and their slower and more awkward ability to make turns.  God’s throne, as Ezekiel sees it, is able to go anywhere at any time in an instant, wherever the Spirit wills to go.  They are covered with eyes and contain a flame therein, representing, most likely, the ability for the Spirit of God to see all things everywhere with a sight that is both penetrating and purifying.  Though seemingly terrifying, this is actually representing a message of comfort to the people in exile, showing them that God both sees them in their foreign land and is with them while they are there.  If they believed that the throne of God was somehow limited to being in Jerusalem in the Temple, Ezekiel’s vision is letting them know that it is able to be anywhere and everywhere all the time.

There are some more familiar images in both visions too.  Ezekiel sees a throne with one sitting on it.  There is a rainbow above Him, something instantly recognizable by anyone, especially the Hebrews.  The second vision is like the first, except that it is set in the Temple, which is considered to be the throne of God by the Hebrew people.  It is here that Ezekiel recognizes the creatures as Cherubim, the angels that are present in the throne room of God.

All of this, everything that Ezekiel describes to us, is representative of the glory of God translated into images that are manageable and meaningful to us as humans.  The Divine is so wholly other, so incomprehensible to us as finite humans, that there is no way for us to see it as it really is, much less understand it.  Ezekiel is seeing and describing for us the human translation of the presence and glory of God Almighty.  The vision ends abruptly at the end of chapter 10 though, as the glory of the Lord ascends from the Temple in Jerusalem and departs from that place… something that we will pick up on tomorrow…



Day 240: Ezekiel 5-9; A Watchman for Israel

As I said yesterday, today we are going to talk more about the call of Ezekiel and the vision that he has.  Moreover, I would like to talk about some of the meanings of the vision, not all though because he actually has this vision again in chapter 10, which we’ll talk about tomorrow.  Ezekiel’s life is also full of symbolic actions and is itself part of the message that he is delivering to the people of Israel.  His actions, words, and visions all coalesce into what the Word of the Lord is for the people of Israel living in exile in Babylon.

Ezekiel’s call and vision happen concurrently, one right after another, and are very much related to each other.  As a priest of Israel, Ezekiel was responsible for being the mediator between God and His people.  Under normal circumstances, Ezekiel would have been working in the Temple of God in Jerusalem performing sacrifices for the people of Israel, worshiping God and mediating between the divine and the terrestrial.  In Babylon however, the people of God were cut off, or so they thought, from their theological center, 500 or so miles from Jerusalem (actually it was about 1,000 miles by way of caravan as they would have meandered through the land for trade and safety).  The Temple represented the presence of God to the Israelites and being disconnected from it meant being disconnected from God.  I can’t imagine the confusion and sense of loss that Ezekiel and the exiles were feeling when this vision came to him.

Ezekliel's Vision Photo Credit: www.flickr.com

Ezekliel’s Vision
Photo Credit: www.flickr.com

The vision itself is overflowing with imagery in an apocalyptic genre of Biblical literature.  Ezekiel sees beings with different faces that have wings able to take them anywhere.  These beings were next to “a wheel within a wheel” that is covered in eyes.  Finally, all of this is under a throne “and seated above the likeness of a throne was a likeness with a human appearance.  And upward from what had the appearance of his waist I saw as it were gleaming metal, like the appearance of fire enclosed all around. And downward from what had the appearance of his waist I saw as it were the appearance of fire, and there was brightness around him. Like the appearance of the bow that is in the cloud on the day of rain, so was the appearance of the brightness all around.

Ezekiel's Vision Photo Credit: www.julian.spazaspace.com

Ezekiel’s Vision
Photo Credit: www.julian.spazaspace.com

While these images, like many others we encounter in prophetic literature, seem rather strange to us, they would not have necessarily been completely off the wall to Ezekiel or his contemporaries.  These things were representative of the One who is giving the vision, namely God almighty.  We will talk more about the meanings of the different things when we talk more about the vision of Ezekiel tomorrow, but suffice to say now that in seeing this Ezekiel got the message that God was not limited by time or space and was with Him and the rest of His people in exile just as much as He was with them in Jerusalem and the promised land.

Interestingly, and somewhat of a revelation to me today, is the fact that it isn’t just this imagery that carries with it representation from God.  Ezekiel’s life is in many ways a representation of the very message that God is communicating to the people of Israel.  Even the call of Ezekiel is representative of God’s call to His people knowing that they have been rebellious and haven’t listened to Him.  He even says it to Ezekiel, telling him that when he hears the message he should not be rebellious like the people of Israel had been.  Not only was Ezekiel to listen though, he was also to take it in, to “eat the scroll” and take it inside of himself.  Eating means making it a part of you that it may nourish and fill you, which is exactly what the Word of the Lord is supposed to do.  This very line has echos all the way back to the giving of the Law and the Shema.

As far as the revelation I had today about this and about Ezekiel, I realized when I noticed that God was calling him “Son of man” and that Ezekiel’s life and actions were representative of Israel, that in many ways Ezekiel himself is a foreshadowing of the coming of Christ.  Jesus refers to Himself as “The Son of man” and is representative of what Israel was supposed to be as the people of God.  Some of the actions of Ezekiel as similar to that of Jesus and, what I found to be most interesting, Ezekiel does things to represent the punishment of Israel and Judah whereas Jesus actually takes that punishment on Himself at the cross!  What a genius foreshadowing that we see here and will continue to see throughout this book.

Finally, though what has been said here is quite a bit, I want to just address the section of Ezekiel 3 where God says to Ezekiel, “Son of man, I have made you a watchman for the house of Israel.”  I think this is a very interesting image that God gives Ezekiel about his duty to the people he has been called to speak to.  God says that whatever He tells Ezekiel to say, it is Ezekiel’s responsibility to say it to them.  If there is a warning, Ezekiel is responsible for warning them.  Furthermore, if Ezekiel doesn’t speak what the Lord says, not only will the “wicked person” die, but his blood will be on Ezekiel’s hands.  Ultimately the responsibility for turning from evil lies with “the wicked person,” but the responsibility for warning him/her is on the one whom God has appointed, namely Ezekiel.

As a seminary student feeling called to potentially lead a congregation and be a leader of the Church, I think that this warning and appointment as a “Watchman” is very important for us to hear.  Pastors and church leaders are called to be these Watchman for their congregations and for the Church as well.  I think that too often we don’t say what we know God is telling us to say, to our own members or the greater Church either.  Perhaps we get bogged down in procedure, or maybe we think that it is none of our business.  It could be that Pastors don’t want to “get up in people’s faces” or are more concerned about keeping their job and speaking the Word of God.  I wonder if in this day an age is might simply be people getting caught up in moral relativism?  However, God is saying here that, like Ezekiel, we are called to speak God’s Word, even if is the unpopular message, because it is the Word of God.  If we don’t, their “blood” may be on our hands as well…  I know I’m just as guilty as the next guy…  but this is a wake-up call for me and for the leadership of the Church and even the leadership of Christian families:  We need to be alert.  We need to be listening for the Word of God.  We need to be willing to speak God’s Word.  We are called to be Watchmen.



Day 198: Isaiah 4-6; The Introduction to and Call of Isaiah

Overview of Isaiah Photo Credit: www.visualunit.me/tag/isaiah

Overview of Isaiah
Photo Credit: www.visualunit.me/tag/isaiah

The book of Isaiah is the first, and arguably the most well written book of the prophets.  Isaiah is a very eloquent writer, doing a superb job of weaving together prophecy and the call to redemption, but not leaving the people without the hope of the coming kingdom of God.  This is the longest book of the prophets as well, separated into two sections.  The first half of Isaiah talks very heavily about the coming judgments on Israel, Judah, and the nations around them as well.  He does this by pointing out the sins that they are caught in and calling them to repentance, warning that if they do not repent they will face the judgment and wrath of the Lord.  There is a is bridge between the two sections around chapters 36-39, which leads into the second section which in which Isaiah speaks God’s comfort to a nation that has been punished with exile.  In it, Isaiah talks of a coming restoration and a time in which all things would be made right.

Part of the comfort that Isaiah speaks of is that of a coming messiah, a servant of the Lord who will bring peace and restoration.  However, this isn’t the only purpose of the coming man of God, the messiah that is promised more in Isaiah than in any of the other prophetic books.  Much of what we look to when it comes to the time of Lent in the church calendar comes from Isaiah’s prophecies of Jesus’ coming.

Timeline of Isaiah Photo Credit: www.visualunit.me/tag/isaiah

Timeline of Isaiah
Photo Credit: www.visualunit.me/tag/isaiah

The actual writing of the book of Isaiah takes place over the course of many years in the history if Israel and Judah during the middle of the 8th century through the beginning of the 7th century B.C.  In fact, Isaiah’s call to be a prophet starts in the year that king Uzziah dies and his ministry takes place throughout the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah in Judah and Pekah and Hoshea in the kingdom of Israel.  He wrote during a very turbulent time in both Israel and Judah, dealing with the rise of the Assyrian Empire to the north, the empire that would eventual decimate and deport the northern kingdom of Israel.  However, as Isaiah will say later, even Assyria was under the judgment of God and fell to the Babylonians.

Isaiah's Vision in Isaiah 6 Photo Credit: www.patheos.com

Isaiah’s Vision in Isaiah 6
Photo Credit: www.patheos.com

Today we pick up the beginning of the ministry of Isaiah.  The first five chapters could be considered the introduction to the whole book, and chapter 6 the actual event of Isaiah’s calling and commissioning as a prophet of God.  As I said yesterday, it is entirely possible that Isaiah was a priest, likely the high priest, working in the Temple of God when he saw this vision.  It is also entirely possible that this vision happened on the day of atonement, when the High Priest was allowed to go into the Most Holy Place and commune directly with God.  He starts his account of the vision as if he wasn’t expecting anything out of the ordinary, and then he sees this amazing vision of God.  The description that follows is one full of beautiful images of the throne room of God.  Many of the images are ones that we see repeated in other visions in the Bible, from the prophets to the vision of John in Revelation.  This is called “apocalyptic writing,” imagery that is very representative of things that would have been already well known by the Hebrew people.

The Angel Touches Isaiah with a burning coal Photo Credit: www.anthonyuu.wordpress.com

The Angel Touches Isaiah with a burning coal
Photo Credit: www.anthonyuu.wordpress.com

The part of the vision that strikes me the most, as a seminary student and preacher, is the vision of the angel touching the mouth of Isaiah with a burning coal.  This strikes me in several different ways.  Isaiah’s confession of being unclean has a very familiar ring to it in my life, and likely in yours as well.  As we all work through the calling of God on our lives, or even as we encounter God in worship and/or devotions, it is very easy to recognize our own weaknesses and defects.  We are indeed a people of unclean lips and we often succumb to the lie that we are not able or even worthy to do the things that God has called us to.  Isaiah recognizes this too, and something happens to him in his vision that has happened to us as well, he is touched by a burning coal from the alter of God.  This cleanses his lips and prepares him for the service which the Lord has called him to.  We too have been touched, cleansed in the blood of Jesus Christ.  The gifts that we are given and the things that God has called us to do are made righteous, cleansed from any sin that may taint them as we truly offer them to God.  Like Isaiah, the words that we say come from God, the actions that we take are ordained by God.  On our own we are not worthy, but we are not on our own are we?  The Spirit walks with us each moment of each day, directing, counseling, and sanctifying us in Christ Jesus as we seek to live for him