Day 258: Daniel 7-9; Daniel's Visions of the Future (Part 1)

Chronologically speaking, this first of the visions of Daniel at the end of his book happens before the incident of the writing on the wall in chapter 5.  The reason that this makes a difference is that we are moving backwards in time to before the Medes and the Persians would have taken over the Babylonian empire, which happened at the end of chapter 5.  As we begin reading chapter 7, we enter into the final part of the book of Daniel in which he writes down his dreams and visions that he has later in his life.   Daniel’s dreams are often seen as bizarre and probably even strike us as strange and incomprehensible.  Some of the things that he is seeing are things that we would wake up from and be thinking about all day because we just didn’t understand the strange images in our head.  In fact, Daniel too didn’t understand all of the things that he saw, and he is often perplexed and troubled over his visions.

Fortunately, in many of these visions, God Himself provides an explanation for Daniel.  Some are similar to the Nebuchadnezzar’s dream of the statue, but more specific in what kingdoms and rulers would come when.  Other dreams, however, seem to be focused on a more distant time, later in history when the “Ancient of Days” appears and judges all the kingdoms of the world and all its people.  Visions such as this are very similar to what we see in the book of revelation with its beautiful and sometimes even scary imagery of the times that are to come.

There are some Christian denominations that have taken these visions of Daniel and combined them with bits and pieces of other parts of the Bible to try to draw together theories and even theologies of what the end times will look like for us on earth.  Some have even placed names and meaning on some of the different images in Daniel’s visions as being specific countries, rulers, and even events in our contemporary context.  In these theologies, much of what Daniel sees is considered to be taken as literal, something that doesn’t seem to be possible all the way through and therefore doesn’t work on a consistent basis.  Its difficult to say, when interpreting the Bible, that some of it is literal and some of it isn’t… however I don’t think that the argument of a literal or symbolic reading of the Bible is Daniel’s point here at all.  Daniel is faithful recording what the Lord is showing him about the future events and telling it to the people of Israel who are lost in exile and displaced and alone in a foreign land.  The message that Daniel has for them?  Hope.

All of Daniel’s visions are centered around the “Ancient of Days” and what he does.  God shows Daniel and others what is to come in the near future.  Earthly kingdoms will change hands; new people will come to power.  In fact, there will be lots of turmoil that goes on from a political standpoint and it appears that the people of Israel will be caught in the middle of it.  I’m sure they weren’t to thrilled to hear this.  However, God shows up in each of these visions as one that is much more powerful than the kingdoms and rulers of men.  In fact, God sits as both the author and the judge of everything that is to come and, though the people of God may suffer for a while and have to deal with difficult life on earth, ultimately everything is under His control and He will bring all things to the resolution He has in mind: Restoration.



Day 257: Daniel 5-6; The Writing on the Wall

While I’m not entirely sure if it is from this particular Biblical narrative that the saying “see the writing on the wall” comes from, the meaning of that particular idiom is fairly similar to that which God was communicating to king Belshazzar on that particular evening.  What strikes me as interesting in this story is that the son did not learn at all from the father.  In these last two days we have seen four instances where king Nebuchadnezzar was humbled before God; when the God of the Hebrew captives proved to be stronger than the king of the world at that time.  Yet Belshazzar comes to power and makes the same mistakes as that of his father with much more dire consequences.  Yet this isn’t something that we haven’t seen before is it?  And I think therein lies one of the themes of today’s narratives.

Belshazzar's Feast depicts a vision described ...

Belshazzar’s Feast depicts a vision described in the biblical Book of Daniel. –31&src= Daniel 5:1–31 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Before we get to that though, there are two stories here about what it means to follow God and the consequences, whether good or bad, that come from our actions.  King Belshazzar inherits the grandest of all kingdoms, likely from his father, and rules for a time.  During this time it is clear by what we read here that he is certainly not a Godly king, nor does he do anything to follow the God of the Hebrews.  In fact, in this party that he throws, he orders that they take out the items from the Temple of God that they can use them for the feast, ultimately desecrating them more than they already are.  It is at this time that the “hand of God” appears and the news is given that his kingdom is about to fall and he is about to die.

Daniel's Answer to the King

Daniel’s Answer to the King (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In sharp contrast to this, we are once again given the example that Daniel sets in chapter 6, refusing to pray to anyone but God.  Even when this trap is set for him, one of the most honored and trusted of King Darius‘ advisers, he does not yield and is punished by human standards.  Yet here God clearly knows the heart of Daniel and Daniel trusts that his faith and faithfulness to God will be seen and honored, whether in this life or the next.  You can almost hear the words of Paul here, “to live is Christ and to die is gain…”  Ultimately Daniel’s faithful actions lead to his being saved from the human punishment that they tried to inflict upon him.

That brings up back to Belshazzar.  He placed his trust in his own power, the might and glory of his earthly kingdom.  He did not realize that it was all given to him by God.  Yet on the night when he celebrates all of his earthly power, God shows up and writes the words:

MENE MENE TEKEL PARSIN

God has numbered the days of your reign and brought it to an end.

You have been weighed on the scales and found wanting.

Your Kingdom is divided and given to the Medes and Persians.

While I’m sure Belshazzar did everything he could on earth to keep his kingdom and his power, there is no amount of earthly power that can overcome that of Heaven.  The same power that saves the faithful also punishes the wicked for there is no earthly power that can overcome God.

This brings us back to the kings actions with the knowledge of his father’s humility.  There is no doubt that Belshazzar knew of the things that happened during the reign of king Nebuchadnezzar.  Indeed, those stories I’m sure were fresh in his mind on the night his kingdom was lost.  It is a shame that he didn’t learn the lessons of the people of Israel.  For hundreds of years their kings had done the same thing, not learning from the lessons of their fathers and now they were exiles, removed from their land, their kingdom taken from them.  Soon Babylon, or at least the Babylonian kings would share their same status: Exile.  It is the Lord who sets up and removes the kingdoms of the earth.  There is no power except that which is established from heaven.  I think the governments of today, caught up in their squabbling and power grabbing, need to remember the true source of their power, the only one that has allowed them to be where they are.  Its too bad that Truth isn’t as clear as the writing on the wall.