Philippians 1 – Advance of the Gospel

Read Philippians 1

Paul opens his letter to the church in Philippi on a decidedly happy note, not because of what is going on with him, but because of what he hears ash been going on in the church there.  He calls them “partners” in the Gospel and is overjoyed by the growth that has been taking place there, which he has heard about even in Rome.

It is not just the church in Philippi that is giving Paul a reason to celebrate, though.  Yes, they have been moving forward in the right direction, following God’s lead and seeing the Gospel advance whereas other churches that Paul wrote to were not.  But Paul himself is seeing the advance of the Gospel even in his own context where it was much less expected.

At the time of his writing, Paul was imprisoned in Rome under house arrest.  It would be understandable for us, as Paul talks about his chains, that he would be in a rather sour mood.  Yet he continues to rejoice because even in that context, the Gospel is moving forward!

Though Paul was in prison, the Gospel continued to advance.

Throughout Scripture, there are a myriad of narratives about God using seemingly bad situations for the good of those involved in them.  Once again, God is using Paul’s imprisonment for the advance of the Gospel.  This, Paul says, is also true when it comes to those preaching the Gospel.  Some do it for selfish reasons while others preach out of love.

“What does it matter?”  Paul says.  “The important thing is that in every way… Christ is preached.”

Sometimes we get caught up in denominationalism, questioning the motives of certain preachers, or criticizing the actions of other faith communities.  Paul, however, is not concerned with the minutia of what is going on in different churches as long as the Gospel is being faithfully preached.  Now, this isn’t a license to preach and teach whatever we want.  Yet, whatever the human motives are, when the Word of God goes out, it will not return empty.



Acts 12 – Escape!

Read Acts 12

In that day, when there was a movement that was springing up, rulers often became concerned that it would lead to rebellion against them and were quick to move against them.

So when Peter was arrested as part of Herod’s attempt at putting down the Christian “rebellion,” it meant certain death for Peter.  All the leaders of a movement like this would be hunted down.  Interestingly, this is exactly what the religious leaders were meaning to do all the way back in Acts 5.

Peter’s escape from prison will not be his last, and it is nothing short of a miracle.  Placed in the care of “4 squads” of soldiers, approximately 100 men, Herod was taking no chances that Peter would somehow get sprung from his custody.  Yet it only takes one angel to make this happen.

I find it humorous how this all took place.  Peter is asleep despite the angelic light pouring into his prison cell.  Imagine the angel sighing and whacking him on the side to wake him up.  Even though Peter has just recently experienced a vision from the Lord in Acts 10, he isn’t quite aware of what is going on now, nor does it seem that he believes it.

Eventually he comes to, and then has to deal with the same bewilderment of others whilst standing outside waiting for someone to open the door for him; it was quite a night.

Unlike many of the other movements of that day that were actually against the government, and failed when their leaders were killed, the movement of the Gospel would not be put down.  It could not and cannot be stopped by human effort, nor can its leader be killed.  They already tried that… and it was actually the catalyst that led to where we are now.