Day 277: Zechariah 11-14; The Lord Comes and Reigns

The final chapters of Zechariah the coming of the Messiah and the time when He will set up his reign on earth.  There are a lot of varying images that come from this reading.  Zechariah is attempting to describe something here that is completely incomprehensible by human standards.  While the first coming of Jesus did indeed usher in a new age and a new time when the relationship between God and humanity is restored, the restoration of all creation has only begun to take place.  We cannot possibly comprehend what it will be like when Christ comes again in His glory and sets up His reign here on heart, so Zechariah, seeing these images from God, puts them into words used by common people.

We have seen some of this reality described for us in Isaiah 2 and in the book of Micah as well,  a vision of what the world will be like when the final consummation happens.  God will be raised up above all other powers and gods.  He will reign on high from His city, which is referred to here at Jerusalem, and all of the nations will either come to Him or be cast out forever.  Zechariah describes it quite uniquely in chapter 14,

On that day there will be neither sunlight nor cold, frosty darkness.  It will be a unique day—a day known only to the Lord—with no distinction between day and night. When evening comes, there will be light. 
On that day living water will flow out from Jerusalem, half of it east to the Dead Sea and half of it west to the Mediterranean Sea, in summer and in winter.

Some of this makes no sense to us.  Why does it matter where the water flows and when?  How can their be light in the evening?  The water if a vision of provision and plenty to the people of Israel.  Their planting and agriculture were dependent heavily on the rivers and the rains.  This river flows both to the East and to the West, which is seemingly impossible, and covers the whole land with the water needed for life.  The description of no need for lights and the days/nights being the same shows up in multiple places, many of which describe the presence of God and His glory being the only “light” we will need.

Finally, Zechariah talks about the words “Holy to the Lord” being inscribed on seemingly normal, everyday things.  This is actually a really cool image of what the world will be like when all things are made right.  When Christ comes again, everyday objects will become holy, an amplification of its former self.  What we are seeing here is a foreshadowing of the “already/not yet” reality in which we live.  Through Christ’s work on the cross, we find redemption and reconciliation, a foretaste of the glory that is to come.  We put on this cloak of righteousness after shedding our old self.  In the same way, all of creation will be glorified, transformed into its true self.  In eternity, all things will be holy.  As Zechariah says, “cooking posts in the Lord’s house will be like the sacred bowls in front of the alter.  Every pot in Jerusalem and Judah will be holy to the Lord.”  All things will be made right, reconciled, and transformed to the glory of of God!



Day 273: Zephaniah 1-3; The Wilderness of Judgment and Exile

The prophet Zephaniah was another contemporary of Jeremiah, preaching the warning of the coming judgment and the message or the need for repentance for the people of Judah in much the same place and time that Jeremiah was.  Along with a couple of other prophets during this time, Zephaniah was part of what seemed like God’s last ditched effort to get the attention of His people before judgment was poured out on them.  While Zephaniah’s ministry actually ended well before the the people of Judah were conquered, the message that he delivered did take place starting about 15 years later.

As I was considering what to write about today, reflecting on this reading, I was wondering how to present the themes of the prophetic message in a way that would be somewhat different than before.  Being that roughly the same message is delivered time and again by the prophets, it seems that, as we near then end of our journey through the Old Testament, much of what is going to be said has been said.

Yet I was struck today by a theme that hasn’t been high on the conversational topic list in quite some time: wilderness.  Remember back with me to the stories of Abraham, JacobMoses, the Exodus, David, and then forward to the exile.  All of these narratives in Scripture depict some of the greater times of wilderness experiences in the Bible.  If you remember these discussions, the wilderness is a major theme, especially in the Old Testament (but also in the New Testament as well), which revolves around identity.  When Abraham was called by God, he was taken out of his homeland and wandered as an alien in Canaan.  In this time his identity as a person from UR of the Chaldeans, and re-identified as one called by God to be the father of God’s people.  This was done through a covenant, visions, and continuing faithfulness from God.

Jacob too has a wilderness experience where he is stripped of his identity as a cheating brother and re-identified as “Israel” in the culmination of his exile when He wrestled against God.  Moses too experienced the wilderness of life in his “exile” from Egypt.  Here he was stripped of his identity as an Egyptian Prince and re-identified as the leader of God’s people.  As a nation under that leadership, Israel is stripped of their identity as a group of Egyptian slaves and re-identified as a nation, the people of God in the wilderness of Sinai.  David too spends a great deal of time in the wilderness, on the run from Saul, and is transformed from a shepherd boy into the King of Israel.

The judgment and subsequent exile also serves this same function, a grand wilderness experience for all the nations of the world at that time.  It is clear that all of these nations have developed an identity that revolved around the idolatry that plagued Israel and those that surrounded them.  Zephaniah uses a variety of different ways to express this to the many nations upon which this judgment will fall.  Cities will be turned into pastures and lands on which animals both wild and domestic will lay.  Lands will become desolate and nations dismantled.  All that made them who they were will be stripped from them and they will be forced into the wilderness.

With all of this there is much talk about the coming day of the Lord.  In many ways, this is the ultimate goal of this wilderness experience.  Sure, the peoples would be punished, set away for their sins, but the point of judgment is not simply reproof, but correction.  God is not indiscriminately pouring our wrath without a goal,  He is showing His power and His might, alerting the nations to return back to Him.  While this will happen through judgment and exile, ultimately this will all culminate in the work of Jesus Christ on the cross.  This is the day of the Lord, the day when all people can truly find their identity a restored relationship with God.

At that time I will gather you;
    at that time I will bring you home.
I will give you honor and praise
    among all the peoples of the earth
when I restore your fortunes
    before your very eyes,”
says the Lord.



Day 272: Habakkuk 1-3; Habakkuk's complaint to God

For the most part, we have seen the prophets in one primary function of the prophetic office, the function bringing the Word of God to the people.  Often times this was a message of warning or judgment, a call to repentance or a description of what was to come for God’s people.  There were, of course, also the times when the prophets would deliver messages for or against other nations as well, warning them of the coming judgment that would be upon them if they did not repent.  This is the way that I’m sure 95% of people view the prophets.  Habakkuk kind of puts a spin on that view of the Hebrew prophets giving us a glimpse of the other side of the prophet; the side in which they also go before the Lord and take with them the cries and laments of the people.

However rare this is to see in the prophetic literature, it is not actually new to us.  We see this rather often in fact in the writings of Jeremiah as he both delivers the messages of God to the people and the surrounding nations, but also laments before God the coming calamity.  Laments like this could also be seen in many of the psalms that we read a couple months ago, pleading with God to save them from the struggles that they are currently facing.  Dr. Tom Boogaart, a professor at Western Theological Seminary writes this in relationship to this dual role of the prophets,

“The prophets were travelers on the road between heaven and earth.  Like the angels, they deliberated with God and carried the words that help the world together.  First they ascended to the throne room and pleased the people’s case before God in the words of laments, many of them now collected in the Psalms.  Second, they descended and pleased God’s case before the people in the words of indictments now collected in the books of the prophets.”  -Dr. Tom Boogaart, Travelers on the Road Between Heaven and Earth.

Habakkuk brings a complaint before God that the oppression of the Assyrians is too great.  Violence and destruction are all around him and it seems as though the Lord has forgotten His people.  The answer that God gives the prophet though, it rather unexpected; God even says that it is something that would amaze the people.  God says that He will raise up the Babylonians, even though they are a wicked people, and they will execute judgment upon the Assyrians and upon the nations of the world.

Even in this though, Habakkuk protests.  How is it that the Lord can use the wicked to punish his own people?  Are they just another fish in the sea?  To this God shows him the way that He is going to work.  While He may use wicked people to work His own will, He will not reward their wickedness.  Even Babylon the great will fall before the Lord.

As I read this, two things come to mind. First, the way of the Lord is indeed mysterious.  We cannot and do not know how it is that the Lord works in the lives of His people or in the larger world either.  It seems like things continuously go south, everything just being negative and destructive.  However, in reading this, God tells Habakkuk to pay attention and see what is to come because the Lord is working in ways that will shock and amaze him.  Second, even after God gives Habakkuk a direct answer, he still protests before the Lord bringing more complaints and questions before God.  Too often I think that we are simply resound to “playing the hand we are dealt” or just “taking it like a man,” but Habakkuk shows us that it is ok to bring our complaints before God.  Like many of the Psalmists, he goes straight to the source, not accusing but asking and petitioning.  Habakkuk knows and understands his place in the presence of God, but he also knows that God is not one who is uninterested in him either and invites the questions.  We too can come before God with questions and concerns… and should do so because God wishes to hear them.  Perhaps God will indeed change His mind, perhaps He will act on our behalf.  He might say “no” or “wait,” but the fact is that when we turn toward God in a time of difficulty, we are correctly oriented to face that trial by keeping our focus on God.

Lord, I have heard of your fame;
    I stand in awe of your deeds, Lord.
Repeat them in our day,
    in our time make them known;
    in wrath remember mercy.



Day 269: Micah 1-4; Human plans and God's plans

The prophet Micah was a contemporary of the prophet Isaiah, call though to be a voice to the common people of Judah rather than in the courts of the king.  Yet as we listen and read carefully the text of this Prophet, we can see that there are marked similarities between the words of Micah and the words of Isaiah, ultimately culminating in the grand vision of “the Day of the Lord” that we had read in Isaiah 2 and read again here in Micah 4.  In fact, this is almost a verbatim description of the vision that Isaiah saw and recorded in Isaiah 2.  He again casts a vision of the reality that awaits us in the last days, where the “mountain of the Lord” will be established as chief of the mountains.  For the people of this time, the imagery of a mountain being established above all the other mountains would show the true superiority of God’s reign over that of other earthly kingdoms and even the gods of the world that would have been worshiped on the mountains.  The Mountain of the Lord would be the chief mountain and it would be one that people would want to go to.  Why?  Because it is from there that the Word of the Lord would go out.  This place is a place of teaching and of transformation, but also a place of justice, righteousness and peace.

I think, in the interest of current social events, the vision that we see here of the people is most interesting.  The people desire to go to the house of the Lord and one of the results is this idea that there will be no more war or struggle, neither will there be any sort of training for war.  This is a rather anti-militaristic image that we get in which all people will dwell together in unity, not simply because they are forced to, but because they want to.  Indeed it isn’t because their weapons have been taken away that they cannot do battle, but because the weapons of the world have been transformed by their wielders into objects of care and provision.  I wonder what this looks like in the light of the discussion on gun control that we are having in this country right now.  I wonder how something like this would affect the ongoing discussions about Syria, Iran, and North Korea.  Does it make sense to destroy their weapons?  Does it make sense to take them away?

So often we focus on the removal of harmful things from bad people as a way of generating peace.  If we go in and get Chemical Weapons or take away the guns of criminals it’ll bring peace to the world.  Perhaps if we make it harder to get guns then there will be less violence.  While I’m not necessarily against these things in principle, they largely ignore the image of Shalom that is set up for us in the prophets.  Indeed, I am not advocating for more or less gun laws, more or less weapons, or to let crazed dictators use weapons of mass destruction indiscriminately; but laws and military action to not get at the root of the problem that we face in this world when it comes to violence.  The problem is sin; the corruption of God’s design for creation.

Why do people engage in such hostile actions?  Why is it that some people seem to just be prone towards violence?  The easy answer, of course, is sin.  Corruption.  Evil.  We can blame any host of things from government institutions that keeps people in certain social classes to lack of decent parenting.  We can put together programs to educate and train people for skills in the labor force.  We can build cities and countries, even and entire world of people that have more than enough of everything, something we are absolutely capable of doing, but the problem will not be solved.  Sin is still present.  As Micah is getting to in his prophecy, there is simply no substitute for the righteousness that God calls us to… something we cannot obtain for ourselves no matter how hard we try.  Though Micah didn’t put a name on it, He is referencing the coming of Jesus, the forgiveness of sin in His blood, and the transformative work of the Holy Spirit which works to draw people out of a life of darkness and sin and into the light of Christ’s righteousness, justice, mercy and grace.



Day 267: Obadiah; Prophecy against Edom

Today and tomorrow we are going to branch off from the original reading plan that we set up at the beginning of the year.  I have decided to split up Obadiah and Jonah into two separate posts as they are two rather different books.  So today’s reading is simply the book of Obadiah, the shortest book in the Old Testament.  There is not much that is known about the prophet Obadiah.  In some Christian traditions, Obadiah is the same person who shows up briefly in 1 Kings 18 as the man who is hiding the prophets of God from King Ahab and Queen Jezebel.  In this tradition, Obadiah is given the gift of prophecy as a sort of “reward” for being faithful to God and hiding the prophets during this time.  That would place Obadiah’s ministry somewhere in the 800’s B.C.  Others hold that Obadiah was a prophet during the fall of Israel and many of the surrounding nations (including Edom) to Assyria.  In any case, it is clear that the judgment of the Lord will also come to Edom for their antagonistic relationship with Israel.

Obadiah the prophet (Овдий in Russian), Russia...

This issue animosity between these two nations was as old as the nations themselves.  The nation of Edom is descended from Esau, the twin brother of Jacob who sold his birthright and basically lost everything to his conniving “little” brother.  Even though the story of Jacob’s return to his brother being full of love and happy tears, the two settle in different places and, as far as we are told, only reunite because of Isaac’s death.  Other than that, we hear very little from Esau except through the nation of Edom.  Their feud is long standing, like one of those family arguments where no one can remember what brought it about… but in this case it seems as though everyone remembers.

Russian Icon XVIII century. Prophets Amos-and-...

Russian Icon XVIII century. Prophets Amos-and-Obadiah (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

According to this prophecy, the main reason that judgment was coming to Israel was because of this relationship.  Edom was rejoicing over the troubles that had fallen on Israel.  In fact, there are many times when the Edomites attacked Israel, or didn’t come to their aid when they needed help.  More over, when the people of Israel and Judah were taken into exile, some sources say that the land of Edom plundered what was left of the land.  It was because of their contempt, because of their rejoicing at the difficulties of God’s people that Edom was the only nation that was not promised any mercy from God.

Like Judah, the nation of Edom actually survived the time of exile and the kingdoms of Assyria, Babylon, Persia, and even Greece for a time.  It seemed as though the prophecy of God wasn’t going to come to pass.  However, in the mid 160’s B.C. during the Jewish revolt from the Greek Empire, Judas Maccabeaus routed the Edomites signaling the beginning of the end of their nation.  By the first century A.D. the nation of Edom no longer existed.  While it may take a while for God’s judgments to become reality in what we know as the physical world, the Word of the Lord is as sure as the breath that you took a moment ago.  When God spoke, the universe was made, when God judges it will come to pass.



Day 264: Amos 1-3; Intro to Amos

As we move into the prophet Amos, we a meet a prophet that was sent to the Northern Kingdom of Israel.  Though Amos was “one of the shepherds of Tekoa,” a city very close to Jerusalem, the Lord sent him into Israel to deliver the message of God to them.  From a chronological standpoint, Amos became a prophet around, but a bit before the prophet Hosea, who was also called and sent to the Northern Kingdom.   Unlike many of the other prophets, there is very little comfort in Amos’ message to the people of Israel; he is pretty much all judgment all the time.  We will see a little section at the end that speaks of restoration, but mostly Amos drives home the point that Judgment is coming, it is coming for specific reasons, and it will all encompassing.

Because today’s reading has a lot to do with the announcement of the Judgment that is to come, something that we have heard many times before, I think it is important once again to talk through the mind of the prophet and look at the specific language that he, and other prophets use in their writing and speaking.  We talked about this on our last day of the book of Ezekiel, but would do well continue to remember this because it is clear that the prophets have a language and a way all their own.  Abraham J. Heschel would say that we have no language in common with the prophets and he wouldn’t be too far from the truth.  Amos, like Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and others speak in sweeping accusations using grandiose language and vivid imagery that is often even questionable for children.  In fact, in many Bible classes for kids of all ages, the prophets tend to be a brushed over group of writings because of their R rated commentary of Israel and Judah.

There is, however, a good reason for this.  Prophets don’t simply use crazy language for attention’s sake, like a CEO in a meetings uses curse words to make a point.  The prophets are speaking from the very mouth of God.  Indeed the prophets hold a very unique office in the Hebrew culture, being those who have one foot in the throne room of God and the other foot in the throne rooms of kings and on the streets of cities.  These prophets are called by God, often times taken up in visions like Daniel and Ezekiel, seeing another side of reality, and going so far touched on the mouth and given words to say like Isaiah and Jeremiah.  They have been called to be a watchman, to bring the Word of the Lord to God’s people and the surrounding nations, but also bring laments of the people before God as well.  He hearing God’s Words, and spending time in God’s presence, they begin to see things as God sees them, with the burning and passionate love that God feels for His people.

So why all of the strong language then?  Why all the judgment?  Why did we spend yet another day reading the announcement of the coming judgments once again?  The answer is, strange as it may seem to us, God’s unrelenting love for His people and creation.  Sin, this corruption of all that God had made good, has caused creation and God’s people to fall and to continue to turn away from Him.  Yet God loves His people and is continually working towards reconciliation and redemption.  Sometimes this means punishing His people though, for the sins they have committed and for their continual denial of Him.

Amos’ words today relate to us a cycle of sinful behavior, continual actions that have cause people to reject God and follow their own will.  The judgment that is coming will break this cycle.  We too, at times, find ourselves in this cycle.  The apostle Paul writes in his letter to the Romans about this:

I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.  And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good.  As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me.  For I know that good itself does not dwell in me, that is, in my sinful nature.  For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out.  For I do not do the good I want to do, but the evil I do not want to do—this I keep on doing.  Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.

God knows that we are stuck in this cycle, unable to help ourselves out of it.  The sin must be punished and the cycle broken for us to escape from it.  For the people of the Old Testament, this was done through sacrifice.  In the death of one there would be life for the other.  For us, the ultimate expression of this is in Jesus Christ.  Paul continues in Romans 8 by saying,

Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.  For what the law was powerless to do because it was weakened by the flesh, God did by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh to be a sin offering. And so he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fully met in us, who do not live according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.

As we continue to read the prophets, keep in mind that the people whom God loves so passionately are continuing to turn away from Him.  What’s worse is that they cannot help themselves out of the pit that they have dug for themselves.  Yet God doesn’t leave them there; there is hope and though these people won’t live to see that day, it has come and the Kingdom of God is here.  God has reconciled His people to Himself through Jesus Christ, and in this time, as we wait for that to be completed, we live according to the Spirit who continues to teach and reprove us, sanctifying us each day, that we may become more and more like Jesus.



Day 263: Joel 1-3; The Prophet Joel

From a timeline perspective, the prophet Joel is likely to be one of the earliest, maybe even one of the first of the many prophets that are to come to the people of Israel and Judah.  Joel himself was a prophet to the land of Judah, though not much is really known about where and exactly when his ministry took place.  What is clear from his writing is that he is speaking to a people that are headed down a path of destruction and God is warning them to turn around quickly.  The message of Joel is quite a bit simpler in comparison to most of his prophetic cohort in the Bible.  There are very little details about the exact nature of the judgments that are to come upon Israel and Judah if they continue to sin, but contained within these three chapters is the still timeless message of God’s judgment against sin and His justice and mercy on His people as well.

Joel’s message contained in this book is really short and too the point, but the meaning and the message itself is but a prelude to the many messages that God was going to send to His people.  He begins with a a very vivid image of what the judgment of the Lord looks like.  As an army of locusts comes and devours everything in its path, so too will the judgment of the Lord will consume all sin and wickedness in its path.  Everything will be sadness and mourning on that day, when God’s righteous judgment breaks out against the wickedness of His people.  Again and again Joel uses images to describe both what the people are doing and how they will react when this time comes.

Yet it isn’t all gloom and doom.  Like all the prophets that will come after him, Joel delivers God’s warning and God’s desire for His people to turn from their sins.  He even points them to the way that they need to come to repentance.  The interesting thing about these things, putting on sackcloth and calling a fast is not that they are the right actions that the Lord will accept as appropriate for their sins, but because of the inner anguish and repentance that they show.  When people in those days put on sackcloth, it was because they were truly sad or lamenting something that was going on in their lives.  Fasting also is more about what is going on inside of a person than the physical act of not eating.  In these first messages to His people God is point out that He doesn’t want actions… He doesn’t need sacrifice… God wants a repentant heart!

This is true of us today as well.  Too often we find ourselves thinking that somehow we can earn our way into the Kingdom of God.  Perhaps if I just do these three good things they will make up for the one bad thing that I did the other day.  As we read further in Joel and hear about the coming of the Kingdom of God, and the outpouring of the Spirit onto His people, we see that it is not us who impress God, but God who has mercy on us.  The Lord may judge the nations and that judgment may be swift and righteous, but is also full of mercy.  We see this in the very last lines of Joel, and the ESV kind of makes these particular lines confusing if you ask me.  God is saying here that all of His people’s enemies will be laid waist and the blood of the innocent people, those made innocent by the grace of God, will be avenged and they will once again inhabit their land and be holy once again.



Day 260: Hosea 1-4; Hosea, Prophet to Israel

Today we take a chronological step backwards in time to before the time of Isaiah, the exile, and even the judgment of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.  Here we encounter the prophet Hosea, one of the few prophets that we read about as being sent to the kingdom of the north to deliver God’s call to repentance.  If you remember back with me a ways, you’ll remember that Israel was conquered by Assyria in 722 B.C. after a long line of unfaithful, idolatrous and wicked kings.  As a matter of fact, if you remember the books of the Kings, there wasn’t a single good king in the whole existence of the Northern Kingdom, also known as Samaria and Ephraim.  There was only one king that would have been considered “less bad” than the others, but when you have to measure kings on a scale of less bad vs. more bad, you know that its a very bad situation.  For more information on the kings of Israel and its destruction, check out the “Destruction and Exile of Israel.

Hosea the prophet, Russian icon from first qua...

Hosea the prophet, Russian icon from first quarter of 18th cen. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hosea has a somewhat unique story at the beginning of the book that has to do with his wife and the names of his kids.  God calls Hosea to take a wife from among the prostitutes, an act that would have been… frowned upon in those days to say the least.  Yet Hosea obeys God marries Gomer and ends up having three children with her.  Each of these children are named symbolically for reasons which the Lord spells out to Hosea.  Yet it seems that Gomer, despite her marriage is continually unfaithful to Hosea.  By the Law, this is a sin and a crime that is punishable by divorce at the least and death at the worst.  However, the Lord commands Hosea to go and love his wife despite her adultery, to redeem her and take her home once again and Hosea obeys the Lord.

On the whole, this seems like a very odd story for a prophet, but if we take some time to think about what the prophets were and how they functioned, it may start to make sense.  Ezekiel was commanded to lay on his side for a certain amount of time to represent the length of the judgment for Israel and Judah.  Here Hosea’s actions are also representing things that are going on in the life of Israel.  We have heard the language used here before as well, the people of God are often referred to as His bride and their actions against God are always considered synonymous with prostitution.  The people that God called to Himself to be His people were constantly unfaithful to Him, running off after other gods.  Yet like Hosea and Gomer, God does not simply allow His beloved to run away.  He does not leave her to her prostitution, to her whoring, but He goes to her and brings her back to Himself.  He cleans her up, washing the filth from her body and makes her clean once again.  No more will she wallow in her own filth, desolate and alone.  The language of Hosea 2 is beautiful, God speaking about how He is going to allure her back and speak tenderly to her.

Does it remind you, perhaps, of your own experiences with God?  He never leaves you in the pit of despair, nor will he allow you to wallow in your own sin.  Always calling, always speaking tenderly, bringing you back into His arms and redeeming you.  This is the story of Israel, but it is the story of our lives as well!  God is relentless in pursuing us and will never let us go.



Day 246: Ezekiel 24-26; Familiar Prophecies

Ezekiel is a book that is full of things that are unique to him in relation to all of the other prophets.  The visions and actions that Ezekiel sees and takes are very different from all of the other prophets and often times make him seem eccentric and perhaps even a bit weird.  Yet for all the craziness that comes with this “son of man,” the message that he brings is very familiar.  In fact, today’s reading brings with it some of the more familiar prophecies, similar to that of Isaiah and Jeremiah.  We also read again today of the siege of Jerusalem and its fall.  These are all very familiar happenings for us, so at the risk of being repetitive I am going to include links to the other places in which these are recorded and the posts concerning them.  After which we’ll take briefly about Ezekiel 24:15-27 where Ezekiel’s wife dies.

The Fall of Jerusalem

Babylon and Jerusalem Fall, God is Faithful
Jeremiah 52

Historic Interlude – The first invasion of Judah
Isaiah 36-39

Josiah Through Zedekiah and the Exile
2 Chronicles 35-36

Destruction and Exile of Judah
2 Kings 24-25

Prophecies Against the Nations

Messages Against the Nations (Part 1)
Messages Against the Nations (Part 2)
Messages Against the Nations (Part 3)
Jeremiah 46-50

Oracles Against the Nations (Part 1)
Oracles Against the Nations (Part 2)
Oracles Against the Nations (Part 3)
Isaiah 14-25

…and many more to come as well…

One thing that is rather unique to the the book of Ezekiel in today’s reading is the narrative of the death of Ezekiel’s wife.  Like many of the other actions that Ezekiel had taken in his life, like lying on his side to represent the time of punishment for Judah and Israel, this event in Ezekiel’s life as well as the actions he takes (or more appropriately stated: doesn’t take) are representative of the posture of the people of God when they hear of Jerusalem’s fall.  There are a couple of meanings that can be found in this short passage.  For one, we see clearly that it is the Lord who both knows of and is in control of the fall of Ezekiel’s wife and the fall of Jerusalem.  God is making sure that the people know that it is He who is doing this and not someone or something else that has more power than God.  Second, I think that God is showing the people of Israel what is happening to “the pride of [their] power, the delight of [their] eyes, and the yearning of [their] soul.”  The people of God had placed too much confidence in the Temple and in their city and land, boasting that as their strength instead of God only to see God Himself, who gave them these things, take it away.  It is a message to us as well  that, though we may value the blessings of our lives, we must value more and ultimately only worship God who gave us these things.



Day 245: Ezekiel 22-23; Abominations

There are some days in which I feel this blog is easy to write.  The content within the reading lends itself to particular topics and/or subjects that need to be addressed and I feel as though the Spirit is moving within me and I know what it is that I am supposed to say.  However, today is not one of those today.  In fact, I am completely at a loss as to what to say about the reading today.  Sometimes if I start writing things will come to me and the words will start flowing, but today that doesn’t seem to be the case either.

I was kind of struck by the opening section of chapter 22 as Ezekiel was asked to judge the city of Jerusalem for the abominations that they had committed.  It may seem rather obvious to some, but what struck me was that it was the things they did and the things they had that caused them to “become guilty.”  While I don’t think there is a direct connection here, I started to think about our materialistic culture and all the things that we have and all the other things we want to have.  The people became “defiled” by their idols.  I wonder if we walk that line sometimes, bordering on becoming defiled by some of the things that we have or work for.  Just recently I was reading an article about Internet Addiction and how it is a problem that is drastically on the increase in America.  Computers, Video Games, Facebook, and all the other things that I could name forever and ever are not in and of themselves a bad thing, but when they become the driving force behind our lives they become our idols and we become defiled by them, loosing focus on God and His purpose for us.

The other thing that struck me today, which I think is inextricably linked to what I just said, was the story of Oholah and Oholibah and their “prostitution” in chapter 23.  It starts by talking about who they were and how they got to where they are today.  While they were still “young,” as Ezekiel says in the analogy, they gave themselves up, prostituting themselves to the many different nations.  The Northern Kingdom did this first and was followed closely and ultimately surpassed by Jerusalem, which I can only assume means the whole of Judah.  What I found interesting in this whole narrative that Ezekiel is saying is that they did these awful things for a while and God sent them warnings and stuff, but eventually God gave them up to their idolatrous pursuits and it is clear that they backfired greatly.  Indeed instead of having all that they sought from the other nations, Judah became the laughing stock of everyone and looked down upon greatly by all the nations.

I don’t know that I can completely say that I understand this in its fullest sense, but when I was younger I was very heavily into online gaming.  For a long time there were friends that warned me not to get addicted and people that tried to get me to give it up so that I would be a “real life” friend to them.  After a while though, people stopped trying and I fell into the addiction.  In fact, a great many of my friends left me because of what I was doing thinking I was a crazy person and an addict, which I was.  Sadly this lasted for a long time.  It cost me my friends, my schooling, and, at least for the short term, my future.  Fortunately, God hadn’t given up on me and he used this time to bring me to my knees.  Eventually I wound up pursuing a career in ministry and eventually Seminary where I am now… but the “exile” or wilderness that I went through was not a fun one.