Washed: H.C. Question 70

What does it mean to be washed with Christ’s blood and Spirit?

Zechariah 13:1 – “On that day a fountain will be opened to the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem, to cleanse them from sin and impurity.

Ephesians 1:7-8 – In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace that he lavished on us. With all wisdom and understanding,

Hebrews 12:24 – to Jesus the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood that speaks a better word than the blood of Abel.

1 Peter 1:2 – who have been chosen according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through the sanctifying work of the Spirit, to be obedient to Jesus Christ and sprinkled with his blood:

Grace and peace be yours in abundance.

Revelation 1:5 – and from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, the firstborn from the dead, and the ruler of the kings of the earth.

To him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his blood,

Ezekiel 36:25-27 – I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean; I will cleanse you from all your impurities and from all your idols. I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my decrees and be careful to keep my laws.

John 3:5-8 – Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit gives birth to spirit. You should not be surprised at my saying, ‘You must be born again.’ The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit.”

Romans 6:4 – We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life.

1 Corinthians 6:11 – And that is what some of you were. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

Colossians 2:11-12 – In him you were also circumcised with a circumcision not performed by human hands. Your whole self ruled by the flesh was put off when you were circumcised by Christ, having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through your faith in the working of God, who raised him from the dead.



Trinitarianism: H.C. Lord's Day 8

Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 8

Q 24. How are these articles divided?
A 24. Into three parts: God the Father and our creation; God the Son and our deliverance; and God the Holy Spirit and our sanctification.

Q 25. Since there is only one divine being, why do you speak of three: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?
A 25. Because that is how God has revealed himself in his Word: these three distinct persons are one, true, eternal God.

In today’s world, discussions about ‘doctrine’ can often be an instant turn-off to anyone who wants to talk about matters of faith.  However, it is the doctrine of the Trinity that makes Christianity distinctly Christian.  Trinitarian theology is a foundational part of our beliefs; it is also probably one of the most confusing.  And, while certainly does not need to have a perfect understanding of the nature of the Trinity to be saved, it still is an important aspect of who we are and even how we get here.

Given it’s confusing and somewhat complicated nature, the doctrine of the Trinity has been subject to a number of false understandings and heresies over the 2,000-year existence of the Christian religion.  While that may seem to be of little consequence to you and me, the work that has been done to clarify this doctrine has a direct and very real impact on what we believe about God.

Because of this, it is important that we try to clarify what it is that we believe about the Trinity.  The doctrine of the Trinity can be summarized in seven statements:

  1. There is only one God
  2. The Father is God
  3. The Son is God
  4. The Holy Spirit is God
  5. The Father is not the Son
  6. The Son is not the Holy Spirit
  7. The Holy Spirit is not the Father

All of the creeds that we have read over the past week, all the theological jargon and other religious writings of Christianity have to do with safeguarding each one of these statements.  More than that, though, they must safeguard the statement without denying any one of the other six.  Some would say that this sounds like a relatively easy task, however, over the years, a number of people and groups have fallen into heresies that inadvertently or purposefully do just that.

The Athanasian Creed, which we have been a part of our reading this last week, states the Trinitarian belief structure like this:

Now this is the [universal] faith: We worship one God in trinity and the Trinity in unity, neither confusing the persons nor dividing the divine being.  For the Father is one person, the Son is another, and the Spirit is still another.  But the deity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is one, equal in glory, coeternal in majesty.

The original translation of this Creed uses the word “essence” rather than “divine being,” indicating and affirming the single ‘Godness’ of God while also acknowledging the personhood of each member of the Trinity.  When we hear the word ‘person,’ we should think of an individual that is distinct from the others.  Again, while somewhat confusing, this is important because we worship One God (not three Gods) in three persons (one being).  Each is equally and uniquely God.

So, how has this gotten confused over the years?  Here are a number of ways and at least a few reasons why they are important.

Monarchianism – Emphasizes God as being one person.  It suggests that the Son and the Spirit subsist in the divine essence as impersonal attributes, not distinct or divine persons.  This is an attempt to better understanding the relationship between God the Father and God the Son.  However, it creates other problems in faith and understanding, specifically around the cross and the atonement.  If God is one person, and God died for our sins, then God is all of the sudden not eternal, having died and been dead for three days.  In addition, if it was not God that died, but rather an attribute of God, then the divinity of Christ comes into question and the sufficiency of Christ’s work on the cross is either lessened or completely lost.

Modalism – Suggests that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as simply different names for the same God acting in different roles.  This is where we get the idea of the analogy of “water, vapor, and ice” as a description.  Though well intentioned, it denies the distinct persons of the Trinity and kind of labels God as a divine being that suffers from multiple personalities.  Again this is a denial of the three unique persons existing in one divine being.  If God is just one person/being and He died, it denies the eternal and infinite nature of God.  He cannot die.  This means that either God did die, making Him vulnerable, or He did not die as Christ on the cross, meaning that the atonement and salvation purchased by the blood of Christ is invalid as He was not God and therefore a human, tainted by sin like the rest of us.

Arianism – Denies the full deity of Christ.  It states that, though Jesus is the Son of God, He was created by the Father at a certain point in time, thus making Him less than the Father and subordinate to Him.  Thus Jesus is not truly God and therefore not a person of the Trinity.  This is an obvious error whose effects echo that of those above.  We believe that Jesus is both fully God (a person of the Trinity) and fully human.  He has to be both in order for His life and death to accomplish salvation.  He must be fully human to live the human life, to keep the law of God, and for His death to be in the place of humans, taking the punishment we deserve.  He must be fully God in order to live a sinless life and in order to be able to take on the punishment and wrath of God.  If Christ is not God, all of this falls apart.  Arianism also borders on the assertion that there is more than one God.

Tritheism – This is exactly like it sounds: tri (meaning three) – theism (belief in God.  This asserts that Christians actually believe in three Gods.  This is a direct contradiction of Scripture which speaks specifically to the fact that God is one (Deuteronomy 6:4) and the notion of monotheism, a foundational principle in all three major Abrahamic religions (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam).

One other thing that may be of some consequence to this discussion is the common argument that this doesn’t matter because you will never find the word “trinity” or specific mention of this doctrine in the Bible.  While this is technically true, Scripture is repute with references to both the unity of God as well as the diversity of the persons within the divine being.  The number of references to Jesus as being God as well as those referencing God the Father as God should be enough to convince us that there is more than one person in the divine being.  The Holy Spirit is also mentioned and used interchangeably with the word “God” many times.  Many are the suggestions of the plurality of persons within the divine being as well.

In closing, a common question comes up in this discussion, “why does this matter?”  It matters for creation because, unlike the many gods of other creation mythologies, God did not need to go outside Himself to create the universe.  A single person, creating the world “out of love” doesn’t make much sense as we know and understand love within relationships.  God would have had to create the world to understand love or to receive love making Him fairly similar to the ancient gods of other cultures.  Because God exists eternally in the Trinitarian relationship, God was able to create the universe out of the overflow of love found there, not needing something from the created order for Himself (God is self-sufficient).



Sin: H.C. Question 3

Heidelberg Catechism Question 3

How do you come to know your misery?

Romans 3:20 – Therefore no one will be declared righteous in God’s sight by the works of the law; rather, through the law we become conscious of our sin.

Romans 7:7-25 – What shall we say, then? Is the law sinful? Certainly not! Nevertheless, I would not have known what sin was had it not been for the law. For I would not have known what coveting really was if the law had not said, “You shall not covet.” But sin, seizing the opportunity afforded by the commandment, produced in me every kind of coveting. For apart from the law, sin was dead. Once I was alive apart from the law; but when the commandment came, sin sprang to life and I died. I found that the very commandment that was intended to bring life actually brought death. For sin, seizing the opportunity afforded by the commandment, deceived me, and through the commandment put me to death. So then, the law is holy, and the commandment is holy, righteous and good.

Did that which is good, then, become death to me? By no means! Nevertheless, in order that sin might be recognized as sin, it used what is good to bring about my death, so that through the commandment sin might become utterly sinful.

We know that the law is spiritual; but I am unspiritual, sold as a slave to sin. I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. For I know that good itself does not dwell in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For I do not do the good I want to do, but the evil I do not want to do—this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.

So I find this law at work: Although I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God’s law; but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within me. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body that is subject to death? Thanks be to God, who delivers me through Jesus Christ our Lord!

So then, I myself in my mind am a slave to God’s law, but in my sinful nature a slave to the law of sin.



Revelation 5 – Seal and Scroll, Harp and Bowl

Read Revelation 5

Of all the things that we see throughout the book of Revelation, the events of chapter 5 may feel the most familiar.  Images of “the lamb that was slain” and references to the “Root of David” are common references to Jesus.  The reference to the “Lion of the Tribe of Judah” is also a somewhat familiar reference, dating back all the way to Jacob’s blessing on Judah in Genesis 49.

The scroll that has writing on both sides would be reminiscent of the giving of the law; God wrote on both sides of the tablets of stone that Moses brought down the mountain.  Ezekiel saw a similar scroll in one of his visions; that scroll contained words of lament and woe.  We are not told the contents of this scroll, only that it is seven times sealed.

There is a great deal of reference to the number seven throughout Scripture.  It is the number of God, the number of perfection, and the number of completion.  God created the world in seven days; there are always seven lampstands which represent God’s presence.  The seven seals on the scroll are possibly a reference to the perfection of God’s Word.  Perhaps one of the more confusing references, though, when it comes to the number seven, is that of the “seven spirits of God.”

As I am unfamiliar with this reference, I have done a bit of research.  There seem to be some mixed thoughts on what this is a reference to.  In Isaiah 11, the prophet references the “Spirit of the Lord” which will be on the prophesied Messiah.  Including the reference to the “Spirit of the Lord”, there are also the spirit of wisdom and of understanding, the Spirit of counsel and of might, the Spirit of the knowledge and fear of the Lord.  Together these could reflect the “seven spirits of God” that we see many times in the book of Revelation.

Others have referenced the seven gifts of the Spirit that Paul references in Romans 12:6-8.  He writes,

 We have different gifts, according to the grace given to each of us. If your gift is prophesying, then prophesy in accordance with your faith; if it is serving, then serve; if it is teaching, then teach; if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead, do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully.

There have also been some references to these seven Spirits being a special class of heavenly being.  Scripture references the Archangels, the most powerful of heavenly beings next to God.  In the canonical books of the Bible, we meet two such Archangels, Gabriel, the messenger of God, and Michael, who leads the armies of heaven.  In the book of Enoch, a non-canonical text which is referenced by the book of Jude, the Archangels  Raphael (also mentioned in the book of Tobit), Uriel, Raguel), Remiel, and Sariel are mentioned.  I guess it bears mentioning here that Lucifer, also known as Satan, the devil, is thought to have once been an Archangel, but fell victim to pride, according to tradition, and was cast out of heaven.  That said, and 8th Archangel does cast a bit of doubt on the “Seven Spirits” = Archangels idea.

One other probable explanation for the “seven Spirits of God” reference is that it is simply pointing to the perfect work of God and the perfect ministry of God the Holy Spirit.  While this may not be quite as entertaining an explanation, it certainly is a probable one that would fall in line with the symbolism of Revelation.  Perhaps it’s a combination of several of these ideas.  What do you think?

One other thing that bears mentioning in chapter 5: a challenge goes out for someone worthy to open the scroll.  The search encompasses heaven, earth, and under the earth, a common phrase in Scripture that references the universal nature of the challenge.  John makes it very clear here that there is no one anywhere, at any time that is worthy to open the scroll… except the Lamb that was slain.

The praise and worship the erupts when the Lamb comes forward is also universal in nature, bringing wonderful imagery of the whole of humanity and all creation joining in.  For many, this is evidence of the mandate of the Great Commission being fulfilled and of the universality and unity of the Body of Christ, the Church, as she joins with all creation and the heavenly beings (10,000 x 10,000 = 100,000,000 angels) worshipping the Lord.  This is truly an image of worship without boundary, something we can take our cue from as we think about worship in our churches today.  Their only concern was to worship the Lamb.  Is that our only concern in worship?



Day 239: Ezekiel 1-4; Intro to Ezekiel

Today we begin the book of Ezekiel and we are going to talk a little bit about our setting for the book before we dive directly into the Scripture.  In fact, we will talk about today’s reading tomorrow, for the most part, and just get a good introduction to the book today.  Also, as a point of personal clarification, this is the first time I have written a blog in about 3 weeks as I just got married and have been on vacation since the 9th.  All of the blogs for the past 3 weeks were pre-written.  Thank you for your reading, likes, and comments!  I’m excited to be back and writing again!

The Chebar River Photo Credit: www.bibleatlas.org

The Chebar River
Photo Credit: www.bibleatlas.org

Ezekiel’s writing begins during the same time that Jeremiah was ministering and prophesying to the people of Israel.  Jeremiah was back in Jerusalem prophesying that the city would soon fall.  Ezekiel, however, was actually in Babylon as he says at the beginning of the book, “among the exiles on the Chebar Canal.”  This is a river that is a tributary to the Euphrates River, and is located in the Babylonian Empire north of the City of Babylon.  Remember that there were two waves of exiles from Jerusalem and Judah.  The first happened during the reign of Jehoiachin when the city of Jerusalem was actually spared.  For more on this you can check out 2 Chronicles 36 & 2 Kings 24.  Ezekiel’s writing comes from the land of Babylon, which means that he was likely taken in the first wave of exiles and was working as a priest in Babylon.

Our tendency, because Ezekiel is set in Babylon is to think that his writings happen after the time that Jerusalem falls.  However, Ezekiel is prophesying concurrently with Jeremiah and the messages that he is bringing compliment Jeremiah’s as well.  In fact, seeing these two prophets side by side gives a powerful message of God’s omnipresence and ability to be with His people no matter where they are, even in exile.  In fact, the vision that we read about today, and will talk more about tomorrow, is in many ways communicates that very message.  God is with His people, even in their  exile.  We see the repeated phrase time and again “Wherever the spirit wanted to go, they went.”  Like I said, we’ll talk more about this tomorrow… it is some of my favorite imagery and writing in the Bible!

The Book of Ezekiel Photo Credit: www.tigersallconsumingbooks.blogspot.com

The Book of Ezekiel
Photo Credit: www.tigersallconsumingbooks.blogspot.com

Like I said, Ezekiel’s writing falls along the same lines as that of Jeremiah.  The outline of the book of Ezekiel is much the same as Jeremiah and Isaiah as well.  The first section of Ezekiel contains a great deal of “doom and gloom” messages, prophesies of judgement against Jerusalem.  This is followed by messages of judgment against the nations of the world as well.  Finally, like Jeremiah and Isaiah, Ezekiel speaks messages of hope to the people of Israel, speaking to their future restoration.

Ezekiel contains within it some of the same themes that we have seen in the other prophetic books as well:  God’s holiness, Sin and its consequences, Restoration, the burden of leadership, and the worship of God.  We will encounter these themes time and again throughout this book.  It is indeed some of my favorite writing and reading in the Bible.  Some of the imagery is exquisite and confusing all at the same time!  I hope that you enjoy this journey through Ezekiel!

Blessed Reading!