Hallowed Name: H.C. Question 122 (Part 3)

What does the first petition [hallowed be your name] mean? 
 

Jeremiah 32:16-20 – “After I had given the deed of purchase to Baruch son of Neriah, I prayed to the Lord:

“Ah, Sovereign Lord, you have made the heavens and the earth by your great power and outstretched arm. Nothing is too hard for you. You show love to thousands but bring the punishment for the parents’ sins into the laps of their children after them. Great and mighty God, whose name is the Lord Almighty, great are your purposes and mighty are your deeds. Your eyes are open to the ways of all mankind; you reward each person according to their conduct and as their deeds deserve. You performed signs and wonders in Egypt and have continued them to this day, in Israel and among all mankind, and have gained the renown that is still yours.

Luke 1:46-55 – And Mary said:

“My soul glorifies the Lord
and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has been mindful
of the humble state of his servant.
From now on all generations will call me blessed,
for the Mighty One has done great things for me—
holy is his name.
His mercy extends to those who fear him,
from generation to generation.
He has performed mighty deeds with his arm;
he has scattered those who are proud in their inmost thoughts.
He has brought down rulers from their thrones
but has lifted up the humble.
He has filled the hungry with good things
but has sent the rich away empty.
He has helped his servant Israel,
remembering to be merciful
to Abraham and his descendants forever,
just as he promised our ancestors.”
 
Luke 1:68-75 – “Praise be to the Lord, the God of Israel,
because he has come to his people and redeemed them.
He has raised up a horn of salvation for us
in the house of his servant David
(as he said through his holy prophets of long ago),
salvation from our enemies
and from the hand of all who hate us—
to show mercy to our ancestors
and to remember his holy covenant,
the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to rescue us from the hand of our enemies,
and to enable us to serve him without fear
in holiness and righteousness before him all our days.

Romans 11:33-36 – Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God!
How unsearchable his judgments,
and his paths beyond tracing out!
“Who has known the mind of the Lord?
Or who has been his counselor?”
“Who has ever given to God,
that God should repay them?”
For from him and through him and for him are all things.

To him be the glory forever! Amen.


Unchastity: H.C. Question 109

Does God, in this commandment, forbid only such scandalous sins as adultery?
 
Matthew 5:27-29 – “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart. If your right eye causes you to stumble, gouge it out and throw it away. It is better for you to lose one part of your body than for your whole body to be thrown into hell.
 
1 Corinthians 6:18-20 – Flee from sexual immorality. All other sins a person commits are outside the body, but whoever sins sexually, sins against their own body. Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your bodies.
 
Ephesians 5:3-4 – But among you there must not be even a hint of sexual immorality, or of any kind of impurity, or of greed, because these are improper for God’s holy people. Nor should there be obscenity, foolish talk or coarse joking, which are out of place, but rather thanksgiving.
 
1 Corinthians 15:33 – Do not be misled: “Bad company corrupts good character.”
 
Ephesians 5:18 – Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery. Instead, be filled with the Spirit,
 
 


Day 239: Ezekiel 1-4; Intro to Ezekiel

Today we begin the book of Ezekiel and we are going to talk a little bit about our setting for the book before we dive directly into the Scripture.  In fact, we will talk about today’s reading tomorrow, for the most part, and just get a good introduction to the book today.  Also, as a point of personal clarification, this is the first time I have written a blog in about 3 weeks as I just got married and have been on vacation since the 9th.  All of the blogs for the past 3 weeks were pre-written.  Thank you for your reading, likes, and comments!  I’m excited to be back and writing again!

The Chebar River Photo Credit: www.bibleatlas.org

The Chebar River
Photo Credit: www.bibleatlas.org

Ezekiel’s writing begins during the same time that Jeremiah was ministering and prophesying to the people of Israel.  Jeremiah was back in Jerusalem prophesying that the city would soon fall.  Ezekiel, however, was actually in Babylon as he says at the beginning of the book, “among the exiles on the Chebar Canal.”  This is a river that is a tributary to the Euphrates River, and is located in the Babylonian Empire north of the City of Babylon.  Remember that there were two waves of exiles from Jerusalem and Judah.  The first happened during the reign of Jehoiachin when the city of Jerusalem was actually spared.  For more on this you can check out 2 Chronicles 36 & 2 Kings 24.  Ezekiel’s writing comes from the land of Babylon, which means that he was likely taken in the first wave of exiles and was working as a priest in Babylon.

Our tendency, because Ezekiel is set in Babylon is to think that his writings happen after the time that Jerusalem falls.  However, Ezekiel is prophesying concurrently with Jeremiah and the messages that he is bringing compliment Jeremiah’s as well.  In fact, seeing these two prophets side by side gives a powerful message of God’s omnipresence and ability to be with His people no matter where they are, even in exile.  In fact, the vision that we read about today, and will talk more about tomorrow, is in many ways communicates that very message.  God is with His people, even in their  exile.  We see the repeated phrase time and again “Wherever the spirit wanted to go, they went.”  Like I said, we’ll talk more about this tomorrow… it is some of my favorite imagery and writing in the Bible!

The Book of Ezekiel Photo Credit: www.tigersallconsumingbooks.blogspot.com

The Book of Ezekiel
Photo Credit: www.tigersallconsumingbooks.blogspot.com

Like I said, Ezekiel’s writing falls along the same lines as that of Jeremiah.  The outline of the book of Ezekiel is much the same as Jeremiah and Isaiah as well.  The first section of Ezekiel contains a great deal of “doom and gloom” messages, prophesies of judgement against Jerusalem.  This is followed by messages of judgment against the nations of the world as well.  Finally, like Jeremiah and Isaiah, Ezekiel speaks messages of hope to the people of Israel, speaking to their future restoration.

Ezekiel contains within it some of the same themes that we have seen in the other prophetic books as well:  God’s holiness, Sin and its consequences, Restoration, the burden of leadership, and the worship of God.  We will encounter these themes time and again throughout this book.  It is indeed some of my favorite writing and reading in the Bible.  Some of the imagery is exquisite and confusing all at the same time!  I hope that you enjoy this journey through Ezekiel!

Blessed Reading!



Day 32: Leviticus 12-14; Holiness Codes (Part 2)

This is day two of what I would consider to be the “Holiness Codes.”  As I started the post yesterday, The last verses of Leviticus 11 really sum up where we are going with the Holiness codes.  They read, “For I am the Lord your God. Consecrate yourselves therefore, and be holy, for I am holy. You shall not defile yourselves with any swarming thing that crawls on the ground.  For I am the Lord who brought you up out of the land of Egypt to be your God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy.”

So what’s with all these codes anyway?  Some of them seem like common sense, others seem a bit ridiculous, all are ordained by God.  If that is the case, then there must be some meaning here, for them and for us.  Again, I think that the key here is God’s statement, “You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy.”

Israel was to be a light to the nations, a kingdom of priests as we talked about on January 25.  They were to be set apart as a testament to the glory of God.  To do this, they needed to be different than the nations that surrounded them.  It is suggested that these were all animals that other peoples would have no problem eating or touching.  (It is relatively ironic that I am eating shrimp as I write this… which are considered detestable to the Israelites).

Another thing that could be said about this is that many of these animals, like those that have skin diseases, carried disease infectious agents that could harm the people.  This could be another reason why certain animals, people, and even things like mold and mildew were considered unclean.  The laws for the uncleanness of a woman after childbirth or menstruation, though cruel by our standards, are actually somewhat healthy and not necessarily odd if you think about them.  A woman’s body needs time to recover after Childbirth.  It is unhealthy for a woman to become pregnant right away after the birth of a child.  Some of you may also know that the best time for conceiving a child is in the second week after a woman’s period (aka after the 7 days of uncleanness)… This could be seen as a form of  natural family planning if you will, or contraception I guess. 

If you’re interested in the break down of this, I recommend reading a blog from The Sent One.  There is a great breakdown of what is clean and unclean here.  The image below also belongs to the writer of this blog.

uncleanness

Finally, though, getting back to the main reasoning of this section, the whole purpose is holiness.  A state of being in which the people of God are set apart from the world, living lives to glorify God.  We’ve read in the past that the dead are unclean.  Many of the animals that are considered unclean would eat other dead animals, meat that had not been sacrificed to God.  This would make them unclean, thus passing their uncleanness to the one that ate them.  Others of these animals, insects included, would eat dung which is also considered to be unclean.  Again, this would pass the uncleanness to its eater.  Disease and destruction  are also unclean… thus people with them or around them are unclean… why?  Because it is contrary to the nature of God, the nature of the world as it was created, and thus contrary to God’s holiness.

If we think back to Genesis 1, the world was created perfect, with all creatures living in harmony towards one another.  The Hebrew word for this is “Shalom” or a state of peaceful, perfect existence.  In the Garden of Eden there was no death, no destruction, no disease.  Adam and Eve’s diet?  Plants.  Genesis 2 tells us that God said, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden…”  We actually don’t have an account of animals dying until God makes coverings for them later in Genesis 3.  In fact, we don’t see that humans are given permission by God to eat animals until after Noah gets off the Ark later in Genesis 9.

So this is how God created the world, without death, disease, and destruction.  Therefore we must assume that these things are contrary to the purpose of creation and the nature of God.  Engaging in this brokenness of creation would thus make one unclean… separated from the holiness of God.  For the people of Israel, there were things they would then have to do to make themselves clean.  Sometimes wash… sometimes sacrifice… sometimes wait until evening…

We too are sinful… unclean… and by our very nature cut off from relationship with God.  For us though, something was done to restore this relationship.  Thanks be to God that He sent His Son Jesus as an atoning sacrifice for our sins!!  In Christ, all things unclean are made clean.  We see this in Peter’s vision in Acts 10.  All we need do is believe in Jesus Christ and we too will be made clean in the eyes of God, washed and cleansed in His blood.  Amen.  Praise the Lord!