3 John – Hospitality

Read 3 John

We often talk about those who have the gift of hospitality as being those who can put on a good dinner party or those who like to have people over to their house.  Certainly, there is an element of truth to this notion and there are many who are gifted with a welcoming spirit and an open home.  However, Scripture challenges our this notion, pointing out that if hospitality means only welcoming those we know, those we like, and those who believe the same way that we do, it falls short of the true meaning of hospitality.

Here John commends his friend Gaius because of his faithful work and love toward those he does not know.  These people are, apparently, Christians but are strangers to Gaius.  However, Gaius continues on in what he is doing for the sake of the Gospel and receives a commendation from Paul for it.

This is contrasted with the actions of Diotrephes who always wants to be first, the very opposite of hospitality.  John, here, is echoing Jesus’ teachings to His disciples, talking about servant leadership and humility rather than boastful, proud talk.  Such actions are not hospitable and are, in essence, wounding the message of the Gospel.

As is always true, the example that we follow is that of Jesus Christ.  Paul speaks to the humility and hospitality of Jesus in the book of Colossians:

Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing    by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness.

And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death— even death on a cross!

Therefore God exalted him to the highest place and gave him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.



1 Corinthians 5 – Are you Proud?

Read 1 Corinthians 5

Paul warns his audience at the end of chapter 4 that, should the not change, he would be coming to them with a “rod of discipline.”  Here begins some of the reasoning for the need of that rod.  As we move forward here, it is important for us to recognize that Paul is covering some difficult topics, made more difficult by the current cultural trends that are taking place in the world today.  Yet, despite their difficulty, Paul is able to speak both sternly and lovingly at the same time.  This too is the posture that we, the church, should be taking, never losing sight of our continual call to love others as God has loved us.

The presence of sexual immorality in the city of Corinth was not unusual.  In fact, it was quite common.  But the presence of it, and more importantly, the acceptance of it within the church community, was completely out of line.  Paul points out that sin this extreme would not have even been accepted by those outside of the church and yet the people in there were proud.

For Him, this was a blatant abuse of the understanding of Christian Freedom and a total affront to the Gospel.  Why?  Because of the type of sin?  No.  Scripture is quite clear that no one sin is worse than another.  The issue here comes in the pride that has led to more sin rather than transformation in Christ.  Jesus’ call was to “go and sin no more,” and instead, these folks were basking in it.

One thing to note at the end here as well: Paul’s words about judgment are directly pointed toward us as Christians holding each other accountable.  This does not place us in the seat of judgment for others but instead is a call to build each other up.

**One other thing: It is important to note here the way in which Paul talks about Christian discipline.  Yes, he uses words that seem harsh: “Hand this man over to Satan…”  However, the tone of that whole statement is ultimately restorative in nature: “so that his spirit may be saved on the day of the Lord.”  Christian discipline within the church… and at home… should always be restorative at its very core, upholding the Truth of grace and forgiveness that Jesus Christ brings and the love that He shows to us… a love that we cannot be separated from (even by our own sinful actions), no matter what.



Day 247: Ezekiel 27-28; Prophecy and Lament

There is an interesting juxtaposition of emotions that comes along with today’s reading.  First, we hear a lament that Ezekiel raises for the city of Tyre, which is followed by more prophecy against the city and especially against its leaders.  This too is followed by prophecy against Sidon, another city very close to Tyre, and then a promise from the Lord regarding Israel.

Ezekiel, when he speaks of Tyre in his lament, speaks very highly of the city as being something great and beautiful at the time of it’s fall.  If you were to put the description of the city of Jerusalem up against this description of the city of Tyre, it would seem that Tyre is like a gem, a city that has everything while Jerusalem was nothing by a Godless city of idolaters.  There is no doubt that Tyre was a city that had been abundantly blessed by the Lord.  It is clear here that they had just about everything and traded with everyone.  Tyre was known for its wealth and trading, a city with two harbors prominent throughout the history books.  The city itself was beautiful and well fortified.  Yet for all its beautiful, it and especially its leaders, fell into the sin of pride.  As I read this I was reminded of many of today’s celebrities and even some of the nation’s biggest cities that seemingly have (or had) everything and have since crumbled before the eyes of the entire world.  I cannot help by think that the old adage is very true, “Pride goeth before the fall.”

Though Ezekiel did prophesy against the city of Tyre itself in chapters 26 & 27, he takes a turn, as our other prophet friends have done, towards its leaders and their pride that also led the people down this road of destruction.  What is more interesting , here in chapter 28 (apart from the mention of the prophet Daniel whom we will be covering in a couple days), is Ezekiel doesn’t just take aim at the human leaders, but at the spiritual leaders of the city as well, namely Satan.  It is clear that there are times when Ezekiel is using words and phrases that cannot be applied just to a human being but obviously go deeper to that who the king is following.  While he is never named directly, it is clear that the leadership of Tyre have chosen to follow the ways of evil, seduced by Satan towards the way of pride and sinfulness.  Ezekiel is condemning both the leaders and Satan for Tyre’s fall.

We need to be careful when we look into these scriptures though.  It could be just as easy for us to think that we know exactly what is happening here and all that Ezekiel is talking about.  Whether or not we can discern which parts of chapter 28 are directed at the King of Tyre and which are directed at Satan is probably not the point that Ezekiel is trying to make here.  What is more important, I think, is the message to leaders that we again get in this section of prophetic literature.  We have encountered this before in Isaiah and Jeremiah and, as leaders, need to heed the warning that pride is a dangerous sin the leaves destruction in its wake.  It is alarming how many Christian leaders in the world are being brought down by marital infidelity, stealing, and even things like plagiarism.  We need to take our cues from those people we see in culture who have it all and think they can handle it on their own, as if they were somehow the source of their many blessings.  It is God alone who gives us what we have, who blesses us in our positions, and who should be leading us wherever we are going and whatever we are doing.  All else is the way of pride and sin.  We don’t “got this…” God does.



Day 200: Isaiah 10-13; Judgment of the Judgers

Again we come to the book of Isaiah reading familiar verses within the greater context of verses probably less familiar.  Isaiah 11, especially the first section, is a text likely familiar to a church goer as it too is one of the more famous prophecies of the coming of the Messiah to the people of Israel.  It too, however, is found within the greater context of Isaiah’s message of Israel and Judah about the coming judgment that will befall them, one that they cannot and will not escape.  Yet amid the questions that were likely raised, which I mentioned yesterday, once again God is showing His grace and His commitment to His covenant people.  Though it seems a funny way of doing it, God’s ways are clearly higher than any human understanding and, like a the loving Father that He is, God understands better than any human father the need to teach His people rather than allowing them to continue in their sinful ways.

Interestingly though, the instrument of judgment, in this case Assyria, is no less sinful than the people that they are judging.  This is a clear message from Isaiah as well.  Keep in mind that Isaiah is saying all of this before it has actually happened yet.  While I’m sure there were rumors of the growing Assyrian power, this is actually being written at a time when Israel and Assyria are join in force against Judah.  Isaiah is prophesying about the future, when sinful Israel will be wiped off the map after which Assyria will come as far as the gates of Jerusalem before being turned away.  This is recorded in 2 Kings 18-19 and 2 Chronicles 32 and takes place during the reign of King Hezekiah.

Looking at today’s text more carefully, I think that we see something else that would bring comfort to the people of God apart from the promise of a Messiah.  If I had to guess, I think it is an answer to another question that was posed yesterday about God’s commitment to the people He has chosen.  I mentioned that, if God was using other nations against His own people, wouldn’t they have wondered if perhaps He had abandoned them?  That question is answered, in a way, by the way God acts towards them as well.  Assyria, and even Babylon later, are under the same judgment, punished by God for their sin and arrogance.  One of my favorite lines of these chapters is:

Shall the axe boast over him who hews with it,
    or the saw magnify itself against him who wields it?
As if a rod should wield him who lifts it,
    or as if a staff should lift him who is not wood!

Its a rhetorical statement really because the answer is obvious.  Yet it is clear that these nations and their leaders have come to that point of declaring themselves better than the God who empowered them in the first place.  This makes me wonder about a lot of things in a more contemporary context.  Do we as a nation fit this category?  So many people call America a “Christian Nation” that has been blessed by God with extraordinary prosperity, power, and prominence in the world.  Yet lately, it seems like there has been a lot of talk about how we have gotten here on our own, a wholesale turning away from giving God the credit for bringing us to this point in history.  I wonder what Isaiah might think about that?  I bet he would have something to say…

As a worship leader, this is something that is also on my mind when it comes to leading in a Church.  The praise team I work with has grown a great deal in the last two years!  We have become more cohesive as a group and together have become stronger musicians.  I would say that we have become pretty good at what we do, despite having a great deal of the “normal issues” that a church faces (sound quality, stylistic differences, etc).  I think Scripture like this applies to us as well, and to Christian leaders everywhere really.  We can look at how God has blessed us, how we are growing and how good things are happening within our churches, but do we give God the credit?  There are a great many mega-churches out there right now that have grown by leaps and bounds over a very short amount of time for one reason or another.  Many that I know center around the preaching of one particular pastor or program, but do we thank God for this and give Him all the credit?  Or do we foolishly think that it is our own work and ability to speak, plan, or target certain groups that has made us grow?  Brothers and Sisters in Christ we need to remember that we are the axe, not the wielder, we are the tool not the carpenter.  Let us remember that it is to God that all glory and honor goes.

PSALM 115

Not to us, O Lord, not to us, but to your name give glory,
    for the sake of your steadfast love and your faithfulness!

Why should the nations say,
    “Where is their God?”
Our God is in the heavens;
    he does all that he pleases.

Their idols are silver and gold,
    the work of human hands.
They have mouths, but do not speak;
    eyes, but do not see.
They have ears, but do not hear;
    noses, but do not smell.
They have hands, but do not feel;
    feet, but do not walk;
    and they do not make a sound in their throat.
Those who make them become like them;
    so do all who trust in them.

O Israel, trust in the Lord!
    He is their help and their shield.
O house of Aaron, trust in the Lord!
    He is their help and their shield.
You who fear the Lord, trust in the Lord!
    He is their help and their shield.

The Lord has remembered us; he will bless us;
    he will bless the house of Israel;
    he will bless the house of Aaron;
he will bless those who fear the Lord,
    both the small and the great.

May the Lord give you increase,
    you and your children!
May you be blessed by the Lord,
    who made heaven and earth!

The heavens are the Lord’s heavens,
    but the earth he has given to the children of man.
The dead do not praise the Lord,
    nor do any who go down into silence.
But we will bless the Lord
    from this time forth and forevermore.
Praise the Lord!