Mark 2 – Doctor! Doctor!

Read Mark 2

Have you ever looked at friends, neighbors, or family members and wondered what they were doing hanging out with that person or that group?  It has probably happened to all of us.  Or maybe it was you, hanging out with someone questionable or suspect.  You may have thought to yourself, “What will (insert name here) say when he/she sees me with these people?”

In Jesus’ day, the religious people were the  determiners of who was “in” and who was “out.”  The out people were considered sinners and were lumped in with the sick and the tax collectors, the lowest of the low.  No teacher or upstanding person would be seen with these people, much less eat with them.  Yet Jesus, as He calls yet another disciple, reclines with them at the table, the pinnacle of relation and familiarity; the religious leaders can’t stand it.

Jesus’ response is striking and convicting.  Why on earth would He hang out with those people that are already righteous?  You can probably sense a bit of irony here too.  Maybe the question would be, why would Jesus hang out with those who think they don’t need Him?  The analogy of His ministry and the work of a physician drives home the point.

I’ve often wondered if Jesus would have a similar response to the groups of people gathered in our churches today.  It is said that Sunday morning is the most segregated time of the week in America, and not just from a racial standpoint.  We gather to worship with groups of people just like us, but where are the sick, the outcast, those that Matthew reminds us we are called to minister to?  Are we welcoming the sick that they may find healing, or shutting them out for fear of the disease?



Matthew 17 – Transfiguration

Read Matthew 17

There are an innumerable amount of stories about a son leaving home, going into the military, and coming back as “a man.”  There are much more about young people going through a trial and coming out more grown up and mature.  I imagine that the transfiguration had a similar impact on the disciples as they saw Jesus in heavenly glory, speaking with Moses and Elijah, both of whom had been dead for hundreds of years.

The transfiguration was a pivotal moment in the ministry of Jesus.  While He was not and more or less God or human before, during, or after, this event marks a pivotal change in the focus of Jesus’ ministry, turning from the work and traveling around Israel and towards Jerusalem and eventually the cross.  In fact, Luke 9 records the transfiguration followed by the verse 51, “When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem.”

We experience our own “transfiguration” of sorts when we encounter the grace of God in Jesus Christ.  When we accept Him as our Savior and Lord we are, what Paul describes in 2 Corinthians 5:17 as a “new creation.”  We used fancy Christian words like “justification,” “atonement,” or “reconciliation” to talk about this moment when we experience a fundamental change in who we are.  We go from lost and sinful to found and forgiven.

While this decision is the most important a person can make in their life, what is also important is the daily decision to live this new life we are given.  As Jesus, from this point, sets His face towards Jerusalem and the cross, so are we to set our face toward living the life, the freedom, and the mission that God gives us as His children.

 



Ephesians 5:21-6:9 "Go: Jerusalem (Family and Work)"

We are called by Jesus Christ to “Go into all the world.”  Part 1 of 3 in our series entitled “Go” as we use Acts 1:8 to guide our conversation.  Jesus say, “You will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, Judea & Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”  This week we will talk about our individual ‘Jerusalems,’ which we are interpreting, for this week, as our families and work relationships.