1 Peter 5 – Leadership

Read 1 Peter 5

Leadership is a pretty hot topic these days and those who work to coach and help leaders are doing great work to equip and empower leaders to lead well.  Peter has a number of things to say to the leaders of the church as well as they continue to lead in tumultuous times.  What I think is important to notice about what Peter says here, though, is not that he has given them some great strategy to lead, but rather than he has encouraged them to follow Christ’s example by imitating Him.

There has been a lot done in the last 20 years in the church to create strategies for leadership and development, for ministries and programs that will work to attract more people and grow the church.  The “seeker service” movement along with “contemporary” worship music and coffee bars in the church have all been ways that churches have sought to attract people or be “relevant.”

Now, I’m not at all opposed to good coffee, and I doubt Peter would have been either, but the much of what has been done in the church over these last two decades has completely missed the point of the church.  We aren’t supposed to be building internal programs that bring people in, we’re supposed to be following the example of Christ.  Jesus didn’t set up a church building and then require people to come, Jesus went out to minister among the sick, the poor, the sinners, and the outcasts.

Now, that’s not to say that there isn’t something important about the Church or about the local community of faith.  Indeed there are many benefits to meeting together, of being together, and of worshipping together.  However, if those things become an end unto themselves, we have completely missed the purpose of the church.  If leaders in the church simply work to facilitate the function of the organization so that we can continue to keep our doors open, we’re failing at what we’re supposed to be doing.

Peter’s words call us to imitate the “Chief Shepherd” so that we can show the world who Christ is.  We do this by showing Christ’s love and following His example, ministering among and with the least, the last, and the lost.



Mark 2 – Doctor! Doctor!

Read Mark 2

Have you ever looked at friends, neighbors, or family members and wondered what they were doing hanging out with that person or that group?  It has probably happened to all of us.  Or maybe it was you, hanging out with someone questionable or suspect.  You may have thought to yourself, “What will (insert name here) say when he/she sees me with these people?”

In Jesus’ day, the religious people were the  determiners of who was “in” and who was “out.”  The out people were considered sinners and were lumped in with the sick and the tax collectors, the lowest of the low.  No teacher or upstanding person would be seen with these people, much less eat with them.  Yet Jesus, as He calls yet another disciple, reclines with them at the table, the pinnacle of relation and familiarity; the religious leaders can’t stand it.

Jesus’ response is striking and convicting.  Why on earth would He hang out with those people that are already righteous?  You can probably sense a bit of irony here too.  Maybe the question would be, why would Jesus hang out with those who think they don’t need Him?  The analogy of His ministry and the work of a physician drives home the point.

I’ve often wondered if Jesus would have a similar response to the groups of people gathered in our churches today.  It is said that Sunday morning is the most segregated time of the week in America, and not just from a racial standpoint.  We gather to worship with groups of people just like us, but where are the sick, the outcast, those that Matthew reminds us we are called to minister to?  Are we welcoming the sick that they may find healing, or shutting them out for fear of the disease?