1 John 1 – Life and Light

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The Apostle John opens His Gospel talking about the incarnation of Christ as the theological foundation that supports the rest of his book.  He says there, of Jesus, “In Him was life, and that light was the light of mankind.”

John opens his first letter, though not in letter format, with the very same themes.  Jesus is the incarnation of God in human flesh and He, being the very Word of God, brought with and in Him life.  The life that Jesus brought, that He offers to us, is also the invitation to have fellowship with God, to be in a relationship with Him.

He then continues into a practical application of what this means as we live into this in the life of faith.  Once again, John uses the contrast of light and darkness to describe those who follow Christ, the light of the world, and those who don’t.

There is a very important theological principle that is hidden in this first chapter.  We often talk about the Gospel message and the “Good News” of Jesus Christ as being all about grace and being saved from our sins and this is entirely true.  Yet to be saved from anything, there needs to be an acknowledgment of the need for saving.  In John’s words here, if we say that we are without sin, we are deceiving ourselves and we continue to walk in darkness.

In Jesus Christ, God brings light, life, and salvation into the world, redeeming and restoring our ability to live in relationship with Him.  Jesus is the only way that this could happen; there is no way we can save ourselves.  So, while we rightly emphasize the grace of God, the only way that this grace is important is because of the sin we find ourselves in.  John says that if claim that we have not sinned, we make a liar out of God.  In reality, we know full well of our depravity and when we acknowledge that, as uncomfortable as it may be, we can embrace the saving grace of Jesus Christ and live true life, in true light and freedom.



Ephesians 3 – Plan A

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What is truly amazing about the love of God and the grace that He shows us is that, as Paul says here, this has always been the point and purpose.  This is why we were created, out of love, and what God has always desired, relationship with us.  It has always been His will to draw us to Himself.

Even after the Fall, when sin entered the world, the point at which God could have said that He was unequivocally done with us because of our lack of obedience, He still stepped into the gap desiring to show us His love.

Furthermore, this plan was always meant to include all the people of the earth, both Jews and Gentiles alike.  While God chose to work through a certain people that He called His own, it wasn’t for the purpose of keeping others out, but rather for the purpose of bringing them in.  This is a fact that often gets missed in the Old Testament, especially by the people of Israel.  They, like the Church, are called to be a “light to the nations” in the same way that Jesus is the “light of the world.”

“The people walking in darkness have seen a great light…” Isaiah 9:2

This full inclusion is made clearer through the life and work of Jesus as well as the revelation and power of the Holy Spirit and God removes the barriers that have long existed to being in a relationship with Him.

Paul accents this point in his prayer for the Ephesians, which is also a prayer for the whole of the church, that

…out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.



2 Corinthians 3 – The Lifted Veil

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As Paul continues to address the need for forgiveness in the offense that has occurred, he grounds that subject in the life and work of Jesus Christ ushering in the New Covenant of reconciliation.  Any punishment or discipline that is necessary in this case, then, is not meant to exclude but to correct and to bring reconciliation; to be in line with the will of God who is continuing to build us up into the image of His Son.

In that transformation, God’s glory will be revealed in greater and greater ways.  Paul likens this to the ‘glory’ that shown on Moses’ face after he went into the tent of meeting.  In the Old Testament, no one was able to see God and when Moses’ face had the glow of God’s glory, the people were scared.  Seeing God meant that they would die.

However, Christ has ushered in the New Covenant, and with the New Covenant He has brought reconciliation and grace that we may once again be in relationship with God.  He wants to show us His face, He wants us to see His glory.  No veil is needed for those who have been washed clean in the blood of Jesus.  Indeed, at the moment of His death, the curtain in the temple separating the Holy of Holies, the place of God’s dwelling on earth, from the world was torn in two!  For the first time since the Fall in Genesis 3, the veil was lifted and we come before God.

The hope that this reconciliation brings emboldens Paul, and should embolden us as well.  We don’t need to veil our salvation or the grace that God shows us.  In fact, as God lifts this veil from our hearts through the hearing of His Word, we find the freedom that is granted us to shine forth the light and glory of God into all the world.



John 20 – Peace Be With You

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The celebration of Easter Sunday is marked in the Church by great celebrations.  We often have lively music, rousing sermons, and well-dressed individuals present to hear them.  More people than normal come out for this particular Sunday because of its perceived importance in life and faith, and rightly so.  Jesus’ resurrection is the pinnacle of the Christian faith, the zenith of the Church year, and the most transformative event of all time.

While much of this celebration is focused on conquering death and the new life that we have in Christ, which isn’t wrong, John’s Gospel offers another theme that doesn’t readily come to mind when we think of Easter: Peace.

At every event in which Jesus appears to someone after His resurrection and His chat with Mary in the Garden, Jesus offers the peace.  “Peace be with you,” He says.  Earlier, in John 14, Jesus also comments on that peace, a peace that He leaves with them, one that He now gives to them again.

This peace is an important element of one of John’s themes, pitting Jesus as the light the world who hate Him and loves the darkness.  Now, once all has taken place and Jesus accomplished all He was sent to do, true peace once again reigns.  Through Christ we have peace with God; we can have a relationship with Him once again, which leads to a subtle yet powerful image that John places at the end of His Gospel: God in the garden once again.

When the world was created, God walked with Adam and Eve in His garden.  After Jesus was raised, He too walked in the garden, but instead of asking “where are you,” as the Father did to Adam and Eve, Jesus calls her by name and she is not afraid.



Day 310: John 8-9; Darkness and Light

As we talked about a couple days ago when we began the book of John, one of the things that John masterfully weaves into his writing is the interplay between darkness and light as it pertains to Jesus’ and His incarnation in the world.  John writes in the first chapter:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  He was in the beginning with God.  All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made.  In him was life, and the life was the light of men.  The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.
There was a man sent from God, whose name was John.  He came as a witness, to bear witness about the light, that all might believe through him.  He was not the light, but came to bear witness about the light.
The true light, which gives light to everyone, was coming into the world.  He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him.  He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him.  But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

John is also, no doubt, drawing from some of the prophecies that come from Isaiah as well.  There is one in particular, from Isaiah chapter 9, that I can think of right away that contains the theme of darkness and light, one that we is often looked to during the Christmas season, a passage that Matthew also picks up in Chapter 4:

The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light;
those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shone.

Jesus bears witness to Himself in our reading for today, saying that He is the “Light of the world” and that all who believe in Him will have “Light of life.”  In this small discourse, Jesus relates what He says to His status as the Son, pointing to the fact that it is through Him, and only through Him that we can know the Father.  He also uses the same wording here as yesterday, the I AM “ἐγώ εἰμί statement.  Jesus is the Light, the Truth that sets us free!

Reading these two chapters more carefully, we see that John is relating darkness, the slavery to sin, and even physical ailments as being part of the darkness that we are seeing here.  In contrast, Jesus says that He is the light, He is the truth that sets us free from slavery, and He is the one who heals the blind man.  I love the narrative of chapter 9 here, when Jesus heals the blind man and he is hauled before the religious leaders.  They ask him all sorts of questions about his blindness and the man that healed him.  They simply cannot put it together that Jesus could possibly be someone sent from God.  The man’s response?  “Whether he [Jesus] is a sinner I do not know. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.

The people walking in darkness have seen a great light… I was blind but now I see.  Those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has a light shone… The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.  Remember that in the past we have talked about God’s dwelling being in darkness.  From the very beginning, when the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters and darkness was over the face of the deep.  Even in the Tabernacle and the Temple we noted that the place that God dwells is in complete darkness.  While this is true, I think that we can see this darkness in a couple of different ways.  First and foremost, darkness is the natural habitat of God and most definitely not for humans.  In the darkness we stumble, we cannot see, we are compelled to sleep, and we are vulnerable.  For us darkness separates, alienates… it is even dangerous.  We are light dwellers.  John’s Jewish readers would have picked up on this almost immediately… the Gentile readers wouldn’t have been far behind.

Yet, in Jesus Christ, those walking in darkness have seen a great light.  Though God has been with us in this dark world, the world that God created but that has been marred with sin.  We are not able to effectively be in relationship with God because of our sin.  It is only in Jesus Christ that our world has been illuminated, that in the presence of God we can now see!  We were blind, lost in darkness, and now we can see.