God's Not Dead! H.C. Lord's Day 17

Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 17

How does Christ’s resurrection benefit us?
First, by His resurrection He has overcome death, so that He might make us share in the righteousness He won for us by His death.  Second, by His power we too are already now resurrected to new life.  Third, Christ’s resurrection is a guarantee of our glorious resurrection.

“If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins.”  1 Corinthians 15:17. These are strong words from the Apostle Paul regarding the resurrection of Jesus from the dead; the event we celebrate on Easter Sunday.

Often, in church, we talk about how Jesus died for our sins on the cross.  Far too often, that’s all the further that the mention of His work goes for us.  Jesus’ death is a sacrifice for the sins of the whole world.  Certainly, this is true and I wouldn’t want to discount this event or the suffering that Christ endured for us in the least.  As we discussed last week, the events of the last 24 hours of Jesus’ life cannot be overstated.

However, Jesus’ death doesn’t amount to much without His resurrection from the death.  The Resurrection is the most important event in history.  Without it, Jesus’ death does not accomplish the forgiveness of sins, His sacrifice is not sufficient, and His work is incomplete.  Without the resurrection, our death is still the ultimate end for us, even if the punishment for our sins had been taken by Him.

Paul goes on to say that if Christ is not raised, not only is the Christian faith futile, those that teach it are liars and are to be pitied.  What a bold and honest statement from the most influential Christian in all human history.

“But Christ has indeed been raised from the death…” 1 Corinthians 15:20. This is the foundation of the hope that we have!  Jesus’ death paid for our sins; His resurrection conquers the ultimate punishment for our sins.  By His resurrection, we are assured that He is the all-sufficient sacrifice, that His work is complete, and that the wrath of God has been satisfied.  We know this because the consequences of sin have been removed.

C.S. Lewis, in his book “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” captures this so clearly in the conversation Aslan has with Lucy and Susan after coming back from the dead:

“…though the Witch knew the Deep Magic, there is a magic deeper still which she did not know.  Her knowledge goes back only to the dawn of Time.  But if she could have looked a little further back, into the stillness and darkness before Time dawned, she would have read a different incantation.  She would have known that when a willing victim who has committed no treachery was killed in a traitor’s stead, the Table would crack and Death itself would start working backwards.”

Yes, an innocent victim taking the place of a traitor, though the Resurrection is no magic… it is the sheer power of God on display in Christ Jesus.  It is the ultimate will of God being played out before the eyes of the entire cosmos and impacting the entire universe.  There is no place or time in which the Resurrection’s significance does not touch and is not felt.  All of this was decreed before the foundations of the earth when only the Triune God existed, and all of it was done for us.  Thanks be to God!!



Resurrection: H.C. Question 45

How does Christ’s resurrection benefit us?

Romans 4:25 – He was delivered over to death for our sins and was raised to life for our justification.

1 Corinthians 15:16-20 – For if the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised either. And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. If only for this life we have hope in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But Christ has indeed been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.

1 Peter 1:3-5 – Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade. This inheritance is kept in heaven for you, who through faith are shielded by God’s power until the coming of the salvation that is ready to be revealed in the last time.

Romans 6:5-11 – For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly also be united with him in a resurrection like his. For we know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body ruled by sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves to sin— because anyone who has died has been set free from sin.

Now if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. For we know that since Christ was raised from the dead, he cannot die again; death no longer has mastery over him. The death he died, he died to sin once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God.

In the same way, count yourselves dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus.

Ephesians 2:4-6 – But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—it is by grace you have been saved. And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus,

Colossians 3:1-4 – Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things. For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.

Romans 8:11 – And if the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead is living in you, he who raised Christ from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies because of his Spirit who lives in you.

1 Corinthians 15:12-23 – But if it is preached that Christ has been raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? If there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. And if Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith. More than that, we are then found to be false witnesses about God, for we have testified about God that he raised Christ from the dead. But he did not raise him if in fact the dead are not raised. For if the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised either. And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. If only for this life we have hope in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But Christ has indeed been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. For since death came through a man, the resurrection of the dead comes also through a man. For as in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive. But each in turn: Christ, the firstfruits; then, when he comes, those who belong to him.

Philippians 3:20-21 – But our citizenship is in heaven. And we eagerly await a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ, who, by the power that enables him to bring everything under his control, will transform our lowly bodies so that they will be like his glorious body.



John 20:1-8; 1 Corinthians 15 "Resurrection Life"



John 20 – Peace Be With You

Read John 20

The celebration of Easter Sunday is marked in the Church by great celebrations.  We often have lively music, rousing sermons, and well-dressed individuals present to hear them.  More people than normal come out for this particular Sunday because of its perceived importance in life and faith, and rightly so.  Jesus’ resurrection is the pinnacle of the Christian faith, the zenith of the Church year, and the most transformative event of all time.

While much of this celebration is focused on conquering death and the new life that we have in Christ, which isn’t wrong, John’s Gospel offers another theme that doesn’t readily come to mind when we think of Easter: Peace.

At every event in which Jesus appears to someone after His resurrection and His chat with Mary in the Garden, Jesus offers the peace.  “Peace be with you,” He says.  Earlier, in John 14, Jesus also comments on that peace, a peace that He leaves with them, one that He now gives to them again.

This peace is an important element of one of John’s themes, pitting Jesus as the light the world who hate Him and loves the darkness.  Now, once all has taken place and Jesus accomplished all He was sent to do, true peace once again reigns.  Through Christ we have peace with God; we can have a relationship with Him once again, which leads to a subtle yet powerful image that John places at the end of His Gospel: God in the garden once again.

When the world was created, God walked with Adam and Eve in His garden.  After Jesus was raised, He too walked in the garden, but instead of asking “where are you,” as the Father did to Adam and Eve, Jesus calls her by name and she is not afraid.



Day 90: 2 Samuel 12-13; David and Bathsheba

It was the best of times… and then it was the worst of times…

Yesterday, we talked at length about all of the victories and the good things that the Lord blessed David with, and today we see that even David, the man after God’s own heart, is not above sinning against the Lord.  The story of David and Bathsheba is a familiar one, told and taught about in many a Sunday School classroom.  It is important because it marks a turn in David’s household.  Up until now things have been pretty peachy for David and his family.  After now though, we’ll see that David’s household will be fraught with conflict, starting with the story Amnon and Absalom.

Yet even this “I told you so” story of what results when the Law and the Covenant are not followed really pales in comparison to the unmatched grace that God shows here and the faithfulness that God shows David in spite of this horrible sin.  While not all will likely read this on Easter Sunday, the writing of this post is for Easter Sunday of this year (2013), and there are some very important Easter themes that arise from this story that I would like us to reflect on today.  Read again with me the words of Nathan the prophet as he confronts David about his sin:

“He came to him and said to him, “There were two men in a certain city, the one rich and the other poor.  The rich man had very many flocks and herds,  but the poor man had nothing but one little ewe lamb, which he had bought. And he brought it up, and it grew up with him and with his children. It used to eat of his morsel and drink from his cup and lie in his arms, and it was like a daughter to him.  Now there came a traveler to the rich man, and he was unwilling to take one of his own flock or herd to prepare for the guest who had come to him, but he took the poor man’s lamb and prepared it for the man who had come to him.”  Then David’s anger was greatly kindled against the man, and he said to Nathan, “As the Lord lives, the man who has done this deserves to die, and he shall restore the lamb fourfold, because he did this thing, and because he had no pity.

Nathan said to David, “You are the man! Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, ‘I anointed you king over Israel, and I delivered you out of the hand of Saul.  And I gave you your master’s house and your master’s wives into your arms and gave you the house of Israel and of Judah. And if this were too little, I would add to you as much more.  Why have you despised the word of the Lord, to do what is evil in his sight? You have struck down Uriah the Hittite with the sword and have taken his wife to be your wife and have killed him with the sword of the Ammonites.  Now therefore the sword shall never depart from your house, because you have despised me and have taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your wife.’  Thus says the Lord, ‘Behold, I will raise up evil against you out of your own house. And I will take your wives before your eyes and give them to your neighbor, and he shall lie with your wives in the sight of this sun.  For you did it secretly, but I will do this thing before all Israel and before the sun.’”  David said to Nathan, “I have sinned against the Lord.” And Nathan said to David, “The Lord also has put away your sin; you shall not die. Nevertheless, because by this deed you have utterly scorned the Lord, the child who is born to you shall die.” Then Nathan went to his house.”

David doesn’t know it, but he is pronouncing judgment upon himself… and Nathan redirects David’s anger over sin right back at him.  “YOU ARE THE MAN!!!” he declares!

Do those words resonate with you?  I don’t know about you, but when I hear about injustice and sin against others I am often outraged… but something inside of me also screams “YOU ARE THE MAN!”  And the pronouncement of judgment has been made… I deserve to die and the recompense for my sin is more than I’ll ever be able to pay.  And the reality is that God would be justified in sitting on the throne and saying “Why have you despised the word of the Lord, to do what is evil in His sight?”  Yet today, on Easter Sunday, we remember the truth of God’s Word… the truth of God’s Nature… the truth of God’s grace.  Nathan declares to David what is declared to us through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, “THE LORD ALSO HAS PUT AWAY YOUR SIN; YOU SHALL NOT DIE.”

This is the good news of Easter!!  Even though we deserve death, being sinners who have utter;y scorned the Lord, we have been saved by the grace of God in Jesus Christ!!

Jesus Christ lived the perfect life.  An innocent, Jesus took on all our guilt and died the death we deserve to die.  In His resurrection, Jesus defeated death, vanquishing it, overcoming it forever that we may live forever bringing glory to His Name!  Hallelujah and AMEN!!