John 17 – My Prayer for You

Read John 17

Jesus concludes the Passover celebration, His Last Supper with His disciples with a prayer for Himself, His disciples, and for all those who will believe in Him.  In this prayer, Jesus hits three major points: God’s glorification (His and the Father), the protection of His disciples, and the unity of believers.

Glorification: Ultimately, Jesus’ glorification through the cross.  As we have talked about, the ultimate purpose of Jesus was to bring light into the darkness, life into a world of death.  All that Jesus did was meant to bring glory to the Father (remember the blind man?)  Now God’s glory would be revealed again as Jesus finishes His work and goes to the cross.  Jesus’ glory too would be revealed, in both His death and resurrection.

Protection:  As He has prepared them for His departure, Jesus now prays for His disciples knowing that there are trying times ahead for them.  This is an echo of His words in John 13: “In this world you will face trouble, but take heart, I have overcome the world.”  He also points out that, while He is leaving, it is important for them to stay.  Though they would face many trials, it was part of their sanctification.

Unity: Jesus prays for what we consider the Church universal.  Yet He doesn’t pray for protection for us but instead for unity.  When the Church is one as He and the Father are one, Jesus says that people will know and believe in Him.

Part of this unity comes from the presence of the Holy Spirit in the lives of believers.  God has made this possible for us; the question is whether we will live into this unity or not.  It seems that, at least on some level, the message of the Gospel depends on it.



John 12 – Coronation

Read John 12

The first major section of the book of John, the “Book of Signs,” comes to a close with several aspects of the coronation of Jesus Christ as King.  John uses these events and discussions to both draw from Jewish history and to foreshadow what is about to take place.

In Israel’s history, whenever a someone was chosen by God to be king, that person would be ceremonially anointed with oil.  Remember back to the stories of Saul and then David, both anointed by Samuel after God chose them to be Israel’s King.  Here Jesus is anointed by Mary which, when linked to the triumphal entry narrative, sees Jesus as Israel’s saving king.

It must have been quite a moment for Jesus’ disciples as they saw Him riding into Jerusalem with the throngs of people crowding around Him and praising Him.  We again get the sense of a king’s return to the city of David.  They even shout Scripture, fulfilling it as He rides by.

But it isn’t until later in this chapter when Jesus directs their attention to the true coronation event that is to take place, one that no one expects.

Until now, Jesus has been saying that His “hour” had not yet come.  Yet in this moment, as Jesus enters Jerusalem, a pivotal transition is taking place.  The anointed Son of God had now come and the hour of His glorification is at hand.  His coronation, however, would not be filled with the expected pomp and circumstance typically given to a King.  There would be crowds, a parade, a crowning, and a final “lifting up” that would take place, all as the Lamb of God takes on the deepest nature of a servant, lovingly giving His life so that others may truly find theirs once again.



Day 314: John 16-17; The Holy Spirit & Jesus' High Priestly Prayer

Today we continue to the conclusion of Jesus’ farewell discourse as it is recorded in John.  After the main thrust of Jesus’ message is made known, He begins to walk down off the other side of the stage, returning once again to talk of the Holy Spirit.  Jesus has taught them so much, and yet He says that He has so much more to tell them, things that they couldn’t even bear at that time.  However, Jesus says, “When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth, for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come.  He will glorify me, for he will take what is mine and declare it to you.  All that the Father has is mine; therefore I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.

He doesn’t just stop here, leaving the disciples to wonder about what it is that they can’t handle though… and yet I guess what Jesus says isn’t really giving them more than they can handle either.  Jesus has told them that He would be handed over to the authorities and that He would die, at least that has been recorded in the other Gospels.  Here Jesus says, “A little while, and you will see me no longer; and again a little while, and you will see me.”  Obviously the disciples are a little confused.  So Jesus clarifies in a brilliant way, while still being a little cloudy on the details: “Is this what you are asking yourselves, what I meant by saying, ‘A little while and you will not see me, and again a little while and you will see me’?  Truly, truly, I say to you, you will weep and lament, but the world will rejoice. You will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will turn into joy.  When a woman is giving birth, she has sorrow because her hour has come, but when she has delivered the baby, she no longer remembers the anguish, for joy that a human being has been born into the world.  So also you have sorrow now, but I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you.

I love the metaphor of what Jesus is about to go through, the ultimate glorification that John sets up, as being like giving birth.  There is momentary (or perhaps extended) pain, suffering, and a lot of work that is to be done to bring life into the world, but when it is all over, there is abundant joy and happiness.  This is exactly like what is about to take place.  Jesus would suffer and die.  This would be traumatic not just for Him physically, but for all who follow Him.  Yet this is not the end.  He will be raised to life again to the Glory of the Father, and with that there will be much rejoicing and happiness… not to mention new life!

Finally, the last part of Jesus’ farewell discourse comes about in the form of a prayer.  There is so much that can be said about this prayer.  There are elements of Trinitarian theology, union with Christ, Atonement theology, Sanctification, and a simply a good demonstration of how to pray.  This prayer links Jesus to the prologue of John and creation, and even gives us a glimpse of the fact that God has been working toward this since the beginning.  Also in here you will see some of Jesus’ praying for the “abiding” of the disciples as we talked about yesterday.  I think, today, I am just going to post this prayer here and encourage you to read it again.  Pick out some of the elements that have been mentioned here and perhaps others that you notice as well!

The High Priestly Prayer

When Jesus had spoken these words, he lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son that the Son may glorify you, 2 since you have given him authority over all flesh, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. 3 And this is eternal life, that they know you the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. 4 I glorified you on earth, having accomplished the work that you gave me to do. 5 And now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had with you before the world existed.

6 “I have manifested your name to the people whom you gave me out of the world. Yours they were, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. 7 Now they know that everything that you have given me is from you. 8 For I have given them the words that you gave me, and they have received them and have come to know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me. 9 I am praying for them. I am not praying for the world but for those whom you have given me, for they are yours. 10 All mine are yours, and yours are mine, and I am glorified in them. 11 And I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, keep them in your name, which you have given me, that they may be one, even as we are one. 12 While I was with them, I kept them in your name, which you have given me. I have guarded them, and not one of them has been lost except the son of destruction, that the Scripture might be fulfilled. 13 But now I am coming to you, and these things I speak in the world, that they may have my joy fulfilled in themselves. 14 I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. 15 I do not ask that you take them out of the world, but that you keep them from the evil one. 16 They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world.17 Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth. 18 As you sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world. 19 And for their sake I consecrate myself, that they also may be sanctified in truth.

20 “I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, 21 that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22 The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one,23 I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one, so that the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me. 24 Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world. 25 O righteous Father, even though the world does not know you, I know you, and these know that you have sent me. 26 I made known to them your name, and I will continue to make it known, that the love with which you have loved me may be in them, and I in them.”



Day 312: John 12-13; The Book of Glory

We enter today into the second half of the Gospel of John, walking from the book of signs into the book of glory.  As we talked about before, John writes the first half of his book with a focus on seven miracles that are weaved into the narrative of Jesus’ life.  Each of these, in a different setting, are placed as a way of showing the reader Jesus’ power over everything and many of the different characteristics of the kingdom of God which He heralds.  We step away from this, without leaving it behind of course, and move into the book of glory which focuses in on Jesus’ journey towards Jerusalem and what John ultimately sets up as the “glorification of Jesus Christ,” the Cross.

There are some debates about when exactly this particular section of the John’s Gospel starts.  Some would say that it is here at the beginning of chapter 12,  others would say that it begins with Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem.  As I was reading through today’s Scripture, I couldn’t disconnect in my mind the anointing of Jesus at Bethany by Mary.  While neither Jesus nor John mention it, my mind was drawn to the anointing of Saul, David, and many of the other kings and rulers of Israel and other lands as well.  There was a certain symbolism to the anointing process, a sort of divine significance and proclamation of the authority given to the anointed one.  While in some ways this happened at Jesus’ baptism when the Holy Spirit descended upon Him, this fits perfectly as the transitional point from Jesus’ ministry to Jesus’ passion.

In our reading today we see some of Jesus’ talk about light as well.  He says, “I have come into the world as light, so that whoever believes in me may not remain in darkness.”  Remember back to Jesus’ statement, “I AM the light of the world“?  There are some definite connections here to that, and to all of Jesus’ ministry.  John is showing us that there is congruence between Jesus’ ministry and the coming death that will take place.  We are also introduced to some new language, mostly centered around the word “glory” or “glorification.”  Jesus talks about this when He also mentioned the need for the Son of man to be “lifted up.”  As we said earlier, John is equating the “raising up” of Jesus on the cross as Jesus’ ultimate glorification.

Finally today, we read of the Last supper narrative from the perspective of John.  This particular passage is unique to John and isn’t included in any of the other Gospels.  Part of me wonders why this is; if their perspectives and writings avoided this because of the humbling that took place in the act of foot washing?  The true reason, I guess, is not known, but John makes it a point to record this act in its fullness.  In it, we see something very true about the nature of Jesus as well.  In many ways, this reflects what Matthew and Mark write about Jesus, “the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”  Peter’s reaction to Jesus’ actions is priceless.  His reaction to what Jesus says to Him is even more priceless.  How little the seem to understand at this point… yet so eager to do all that Jesus says.

I think we shall end with Jesus’ words after He has returned to the Table with them.  They are quite meaningful and really sum up both the action that He has taken in washing the disciples feet and the action that He will take to wash them of their sins as well:

Do you understand what I have done to you?  You call me Teacher and Lord, and you are right, for so I am.  If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.  For I have given you an example, that you also should do just as I have done to you.  Truly, truly, I say to you, a servant is not greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him.  If you know these things, blessed are you if you do them.  I am not speaking of all of you; I know whom I have chosen. But the Scripture will be fulfilled, ‘He who ate my bread has lifted his heel against me.’  I am telling you this now, before it takes place, that when it does take place you may believe that I am he.  Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever receives the one I send receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me.