Hebrews 11:1-3 "Faith is…"



Day 172: Psalms 96-102; The Lord is King

There are a lot of bad things that are going on in the world today.  We hear about something new everyday it seems.  Whether it is our government that is doing something that the people do not seem to like, or another government oppressing its people, it appears as though many of the leaders of the world seem to have fallen victim to corruption.  Then there are the wars and uprisings that are happening all over the place; religious groups killing each other in the name of God or Allah or some other deity that they worship saying that it is “part of their religion,” even though it clearly isn’t.  Add to this the seemingly endless stream of natural disasters that kill thousands  of people every year and all the talk of how we are polluting the planet and causing this that and the other thing.

Natural Disasters Photo Credit: www.harunyahya.com ***Please Note: I do not endorse this website, but simply give credit for the picture***

Natural Disasters
Photo Credit: www.harunyahya.com
***Please Note: I do not endorse this website, but simply give credit for the picture***

The news is full of horrific stories of violence and people using the bad things to push their political agendas.  Poverty, hunger, oppression, and a myriad of other things are still major social issues with people that are stuck in a system that seems to be designed to keep them stuck right where they are.  All this and more is more than enough to dishearten any of us into thinking that the whole world is ‘going to hell in a hand basket‘ and God doesn’t seem to give two hoots about it.  Yet the Psalms that we encounter today very clearly challenge that disheartened assumption:

Oh sing to the Lord a new song, sing to the Lord all the earth…
The Lord reigns, let the peoples rejoice…
Oh sing to the Lord a new song, for he has done marvelous things…
The Lord reigns; let the peoples tremble!

These are the first lines of Psalms 96-99, all psalms of the Lord’s Kingship.  These are known as the enthronement psalms and speak very clearly of God’s sovereign rule and affirms His position as a powerful Creator and sovereign Lord.  It may seem as though everything is circling the drain, but Scripture is very clear that God is in control.  Sometimes I think that this is a cop-out answer to any problem that people are facing, or rather clearly not facing in their own lives; a way of saying “I don’t have to deal with this because God will take care of it.”  While I don’t necessarily agree that hiding behind the fact that God is truly on the throne always and is truly reigning over us is an excuse for inaction, I do believe that it offers us a level of comfort in understanding that there is a higher power at work in the world, often in ways that we cannot necessarily see or understand.

God upholds the world in His hands!

God upholds the world in His hands!

We have talked about this before; it is a conversation that goes all the way back to Adam and Noah.  God created the world and He is intimately involved in all that goes on in it.  God’s covenant with Noah tells us that God is always and forever sustaining the world and upholding it and all that is in it.  We have not been left to fend for ourselves!  Indeed there is nothing that goes on in the world that doesn’t happen because God allows it to happen… even the bad stuff.  While we are certainly allowed free will to decide, and God sustains our lives even in our sinful actions, He doesn’t applaud them or their results.  However, if God didn’t sustain us we would simply cease to exist.

But we believe that God is more than just involved in sustaining the world and making sure things continue to run, we believe that God is working out His will for creation! He is working to bring it back from its fallen state, to bring it back to the perfection that it was created for.  God is working towards restoration and no evil action or natural disaster can stop this!  We may not always see it and we certainly don’t always feel it, but God is always there working His will and some day we will see the end result of God’s work: the full and complete restoration of the world!!  Amen!  Maranatha!  Come Lord Jesus!

PSALM 96-99 are Enthronement Psalms that are written anonymously.  These psalms are also psalms of praise and thanksgiving that are Messianic in nature and have prophetic overtones to them as well.

PSALM 100 is a rather well know song of praise and thanksgiving that is written anonymously.  This psalm was very popular for my family around thanksgiving time.

PSALM 101 is a Royal Psalm that is written by King David that is also didactic in nature.

PSALM 102 is a penitential psalm of lament that is also written by King David.  There is a very clear thread of hope and trust that shows up in the middle of this psalm, even though it seems to end on a bit of a low note.



Day 171: Psalms 90-95; The Psalm of Moses

Today begins book 4 of the Psalms, of which most of the psalms are written anonymously.  The first psalm in this book, however, is the only psalm in the book of Psalms that is attributed to Moses.  It is considered to be the lament of Moses, likely made while the people of Israel were camped at Mount Sinai or while they were wondering in the wilderness.  As I read it, I certainly get the feeling that there is something that is not going right and Moses is crying out to God in a very humbling way.  This Psalm, for all intents and purposes, really puts God and creation right in their places.  Moses magnifies the greatness of God and attests to the weakness and frailty of humanity.  In it, he is teaching the reader/hearer of God’s might and power while comparing it to the meager position that creation holds before Him.  Interestingly, this is not the only song that Moses writes that is recorded in the Bible and his other major song, though a song of praise and thanksgiving, is not at all unlike Psalm 90 either.  I refer to the song that Moses sings after the people of Israel cross the Red Sea.  Let me encourage you to read this song as it is recorded in Exodus 15, and compare it to Psalm 90.  Do you see any similarities?  Differences?  What do you think this says about Moses?

Moses Parts the Red Sea Photo Credit: www.rapgenius.com

Moses Parts the Red Sea
Photo Credit: www.rapgenius.com

I will sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously;
    the horse and his rider he has thrown into the sea.
The Lord is my strength and my song,
    and he has become my salvation;
this is my God, and I will praise him,
    my father’s God, and I will exalt him.
The Lord is a man of war;
    the Lord is his name.

Pharaoh’s chariots and his host he cast into the sea,
    and his chosen officers were sunk in the Red Sea.
The floods covered them;
    they went down into the depths like a stone.
Your right hand, O Lord, glorious in power,
    your right hand, O Lord, shatters the enemy.
In the greatness of your majesty you overthrow your adversaries;
    you send out your fury; it consumes them like stubble.
At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up;
    the floods stood up in a heap;
    the deeps congealed in the heart of the sea.
The enemy said, ‘I will pursue, I will overtake,
    I will divide the spoil, my desire shall have its fill of them.
    I will draw my sword; my hand shall destroy them.’
You blew with your wind; the sea covered them;
    they sank like lead in the mighty waters.

Who is like you, O Lord, among the gods?
    Who is like you, majestic in holiness,
    awesome in glorious deeds, doing wonders?
You stretched out your right hand;
    the earth swallowed them.

You have led in your steadfast love the people whom you have redeemed;
    you have guided them by your strength to your holy abode.
The peoples have heard; they tremble;
    pangs have seized the inhabitants of Philistia.
Now are the chiefs of Edom dismayed;
    trembling seizes the leaders of Moab;
    all the inhabitants of Canaan have melted away.
Terror and dread fall upon them;
    because of the greatness of your arm, they are still as a stone,
till your people, O Lord, pass by,
    till the people pass by whom you have purchased.
You will bring them in and plant them on your own mountain,
    the place, O Lord, which you have made for your abode,
    the sanctuary, O Lord, which your hands have established.
The Lord will reign forever and ever.”

PSALM 90 is a psalm of lament that was written by Moses. As is clear with Moses’ style of writing when it comes to songs, this psalm is didactic in nature and teaches about the greatness of God over and above all of creation.

PSALM 91 is a confession of trust that was written anonymously. This psalm is also didactic and weaves in a a clear thread of thanksgiving for God’s faithfulness, strength and protection.  Interestingly, Psalm 91:11 is the Scripture that Satan quotes when he is testing Jesus in Matthew 4 and Luke 4.

PSALM 92 is a song of praise that was also written anonymously. This psalm too is clearly didactic in nature, singing of the great works of God and how good it is to praise Him for what He has done.  The title given this psalm is “A song for the Sabbath.”  I wonder how many of us truly feel this way on Sunday morning when we come to church… I know I struggle with it often…

PSALM 93 is also a song of praise, one that is also known as a song of the Lord’s Kingship, and was written anonymously. A Song of the Lord’s Kingship is also known as an enthronement psalm, written to describe God’s sovereign rule and affirm His position as a powerful Creator and sovereign Lord.  Along with this, psalm 93 is also a song of praise and has many messianic overtones. 

PSALM 94 is a prayer of lament that was also written anonymously. Like many of the lamenting psalms, this too is didactic in nature with some imprecatory qualities as well.  There is a clear turn towards hope and trust at the end as well, making this Psalm almost Davidic in nature, even though the writer is anonymous.

PSALM 95 is a song of praise that too was written anonymously.  It is short and sweet, but has inspired some contemporary worship songs!



Day 162: Psalms 43-48; Psalms and Songs of Praise

Today we come to a group of Psalms that are all Psalms oriented around praising God.  While many of the Psalms have elements of praise in them, these particular Psalms, and some others, are full of praise and thanksgiving to the Lord.  They take time within them to describe the many attributes of God and spell out very clearly who God is and why the writers are praising Him.  When I read these particular psalms, I often feel as though I stand in awe of God a great deal more than perhaps the average day of the week.  God is so eloquently described and so greatly uplifted I can’t help but be more amazed by Him and His acts.  Its as if I am being reminded once again who God really is and, on top of that, I am praising Him while learning more about Him.  In some ways its the same as when we lament and but remember in our lament who God is and why we continue to place our hope in Him even through the bad times.

Raising up our hands in worship

Raising up our hands in worship

Reading these psalms of praise, which were likely the popular praise songs of their day makes me think a bit about our contemporary context of worship as well.  Day after day there seems to be a plethora of new Christian music out there, its almost hard to sift through it all.  Some of it is certainly meant to be music that can be used in a corporate worship setting while the rest of it certainly isn’t.  I think many of my readers will know what I’m talking about, but for the sake of the rest, let me explain.

There are songs that are written that are clearly directed toward God, songs that are intended to be worshipful in nature.  There are also songs that definitely don’t fit this category.  In the mix are songs that are theologically solid, while others are definitely not.  I also know that there are many songs that are very well suited for congregational singing, while others are not for one reason or another.  Along with these there are many other categories that I tend to look at in music as I evaluate it for corporate worship at Overisel.  The music we sing may be different than the songs that you sing at your church, but the important thing is that when we join together for corporate worship, we are able to lift up and glorify the name of God together as the body of Christ.

Too often I think that we get caught up in the hype of the contemporary Christian music that is out there.  Every song means something different to someone and we find songs that we feel are “cool” and think they would be great for worship at church.  While I don’t want to discount anyone’s feelings towards a song of the emotions that a song my raise, it is important to remember that worship is about God, not about us.  It isn’t about the style that we like or the songs that we like best.  Worship is about raising up and glorifying God through all that we do, and particularly in our corporate worship.  Anything that would get in our way, anything that might hinder us from worship, anything that would take the place of God in our lives including the things that we want is idolatry.  Let us make sure that it is truly God that we are magnifying in our worship each and every day.

Kneeling at the Cross

Kneeling at the Cross

PSALM 43 is a psalm of lament that is actually a continuation from psalm 42.  At first these two psalms were combined, but in the cannon of Scripture, they have become Psalm 42 & 43.  This Psalm was written by the Korahites and is also a psalm of pilgrimage, also known as a psalm of ascent.

PSALM 44 is a particularly dark psalm of lament written by the Korahites.  There is definitely an section in which we see hope and trust in this psalm, but it is located in the center of very deep lament.

PSALM 45 is a royal psalm and  which has elements of a prophetic psalm.  It was also written by the Korahites and is considered by many to be “the wedding psalm” as it is indeed a wedding song.

PSALM 46 is a psalm of praise that is written by the Korahites as well.  In this psalm we can clearly see the elements of thanksgiving as well.  This psalm is also considered to be a psalm of ascent or a pilgrimage psalm.

PSALM 47 is also a psalm of praise that is also written by the Korahites.  This psalm is also called an enthronement psalm as describes God’s sovereign rule and affirms His position as a powerful Creator and sovereign Lord.

PSALM 48 is a psalm of praise and thanksgiving that is written by the Korahites.  This too, along with psalm 43 and 46, is a psalm of ascent or a pilgrimage psalm, something that is made somewhat clear as we see the author talking about the city of Zion.  This is usually a give away that the Psalm is a psalm of ascent.