The Eighth Commandment: H.C. Question 110 (Part 1)

What does God forbid in the eighth commandment? 
 
Exodus 22:1 – “Whoever steals an ox or a sheep and slaughters it or sells it must pay back five head of cattle for the ox and four sheep for the sheep.
 
1 Corinthians 5:9-10 – I wrote to you in my letter not to associate with sexually immoral people— not at all meaning the people of this world who are immoral, or the greedy and swindlers, or idolaters. In that case you would have to leave this world.
 
1 Corinthians 6:9-10 – Or do you not know that wrongdoers will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor men who have sex with men nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God.
 
Micah 6:9-11 – Listen! The Lord is calling to the city— and to fear your name is wisdom— “Heed the rod and the One who appointed it.  Am I still to forget your ill-gotten treasures, you wicked house, and the short ephah, which is accursed?  Shall I acquit someone with dishonest scales,  with a bag of false weights?
 
Luke 3:14 – Then some soldiers asked him, “And what should we do?”  He replied, “Don’t extort money and don’t accuse people falsely—be content with your pay.”
 
James 5:1-6 – Now listen, you rich people, weep and wail because of the misery that is coming on you. Your wealth has rotted, and moths have eaten your clothes. Your gold and silver are corroded. Their corrosion will testify against you and eat your flesh like fire. You have hoarded wealth in the last days. Look! The wages you failed to pay the workers who mowed your fields are crying out against you. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord Almighty. You have lived on earth in luxury and self-indulgence. You have fattened yourselves in the day of slaughter. You have condemned and murdered the innocent one, who was not opposing you.
 
Deuteronomy 25:13-16 – Do not have two differing weights in your bag—one heavy, one light. Do not have two differing measures in your house—one large, one small. You must have accurate and honest weights and measures, so that you may live long in the land the Lord your God is giving you. For the Lord, your God detests anyone who does these things, anyone who deals dishonestly.
 


James 5 – Warnings and Prayers

Read James 5

It is no secret in Scripture that God has a special place in His heart for the oppressed and marginalized.  Much of the mission of the Church is based on a call to care for the widow, the orphan, those in prison, and the oppressed and much of the early church was made up of such people.  The makeup of churches nowadays seems to have changed a bit.  Church appears to be a place where those who have their lives all together go, not where the broken come to receive healing.

James issues a warning to those who are “rich,” but it goes for all those who oppress or ignore the oppressed and marginalized.  Our actions in this regard do not go unnoticed before the thrown of God.  We must be careful in how we act and in where our priorities lie for it is not our earthly wealth that matters to God, but what we did with the blessings, actions that reveal where our heart is, that He has given us that truly matters.

One of the ways we can ensure a proper orientation in our lives in this, and all matters that James brings up, is committing to prayer.  We don’t talk about this enough, I think, in the church.  When we come before God, we come to praise Him, to thank Him, and to lift up our needs and the needs of the world before Him.  We do this because God calls us to, because He is capable of handling our needs, and because we trust Him.  Doing so, however, does not exempt us from action either.  God calls us to be active participants in His work in the world and this happens through the prayers and actions of His people.  When we invite God into situations, we believe that He is going to act in ways the build His Kingdom and further His will in the world.



1 Timothy 6 – Pursue Righteousness

Read 1 Timothy 6

Paul warns Timothy once again with regards to those who would cause him to veer off course through false teachings.  There is a sense here that Paul is making a distinction between what looks good and what is actually good.  The truth of the Gospel message brought and taught by Jesus Christ is the true good that must be held to in the church.  Against all other teachings, thoughts, or possibilities, this truth is what brings freedom, life, and true gain.

This world has an infinite number of things that pretend to offer comfort, power, and even hope; a way to make ourselves secure.  Yet all of them are empty and hollow, offering nothing but bondage endless worry.  It is true, what they say, the more money you have, the more worry you have as well.

Things like money are not inherently bad.  As a matter of fact, money is a way that God uses to provide for and bless us in our life here on earth.  We can work and acquire it, being thankful to God for his provision in our lives and remembering that all the blessings that we have come from Him alone.

In doing this, we maintain the proper orientation of our lives, keeping God first in all things, living thankful lives in response to His grace, and therefore giving a “good confession” of our faith to all those who are around us.  This life, however, is not something we can do on our own.  Paul continually encourages Timothy to hold on to the truth he has learned, which is our charge as well.

Not only that, we need to be listening for the direction of the Holy Spirit in our lives, seeking His direction in all things.  When we do this, we will find ourselves faithful followers of Christ, content with that which God has blessed us, and truly rich in all that is of eternal consequence.



Mark 10 – The 1%

Read Mark 10

A lot of emphases is often placed on the “top 1%” of our society.  People in this category range from Hollywood stars to successful business people, athletes to politicians.  Often, these folks are idolized for their wealth and success, sometimes even envied, yet there are things, the most important things, that money and material wealth cannot buy.

In his interaction with Jesus, the “Rich Young Ruler” does everything he can to give the impression that he has his life all together.  It seems as though he is looking for Jesus to verify that he is on the right track for the Kingdom of Heaven.  Jesus’ answer, however, stuns him.

Scripture says, “He went away sad because he had great wealth.”  Literally reading this, it means that he “owned much property.”

This seems to be the story of his life.  He did everything right, followed all the laws, and even obtained vast material blessing.  However, what He missed was the very core of what God desires from us: our heart.  The true nature of this man’s heart is revealed when he is asked to give up the things he has many of.

Jesus’ answer, though, indicates the priority of the heart of God too.  Not only does God want us to give Him our hearts, He also desires our hearts to be for those around us.  Never in Scripture do we find encouragement to gain wealth for our own sake, to horde money and resources for gaining power for ourselves. God’s heart and His desire for the hearts of His people is to care for the marginalized.  Perhaps, though, there is a not so hidden truth here: when our heart is for God and for others, blessing and wealth, that of the God’s Kingdom, will truly be found.