God the Father: H.C. Question 26 (Part 3)

What do you believe when you say, “I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth”?

Matthew 6:25-26, 30 – “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?

If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith?

Matthew 10:29 – Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.

Ephesians 1:5, 11 – he predestined us for adoption to sonship through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will—

In him we were also chosen, having been predestined according to the plan of him who works out everything in conformity with the purpose of his will,

John 1:12-13 – Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.

Romans 8:15-16, 28 – The Spirit you received does not make you slaves, so that you live in fear again; rather, the Spirit you received brought about your adoption to sonship. And by him we cry, “Abba, Father.” The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children…

And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.

Galatians 4:4-7 – But when the set time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to sonship. Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” So you are no longer a slave, but God’s child; and since you are his child, God has made you also an heir.

Psalm 55:22 – Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he will never let the righteous be shaken.

Luke 12:22-31 – Then Jesus said to his disciples: “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat; or about your body, what you will wear. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothes. Consider the ravens: They do not sow or reap, they have no storeroom or barn; yet God feeds them. And how much more valuable you are than birds! Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to your life? Since you cannot do this very little thing, why do you worry about the rest?

“Consider how the wild flowers grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you, not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today, and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, how much more will he clothe you—you of little faith! And do not set your heart on what you will eat or drink; do not worry about it. For the pagan world runs after all such things, and your Father knows that you need them. But seek his kingdom, and these things will be given to you as well.

Genesis 18:14 – Is anything too hard for the Lord? I will return to you at the appointed time next year, and Sarah will have a son.”

Romans 8:31-39 – What, then, shall we say in response to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things? Who will bring any charge against those whom God has chosen? It is God who justifies. Who then is the one who condemns? No one. Christ Jesus who died—more than that, who was raised to life—is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? As it is written:

“For your sake we face death all day long;
we are considered as sheep to be slaughtered.”
No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Matthew 7:9-11 – “Which of you, if your son asks for bread, will give him a stone? Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a snake? If you, then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good gifts to those who ask him!



2 Corinthians 9 – Cheerful Giving

Read 2 Corinthians 9

In a number of ways, 1 Corinthians 9 almost feels like a rehashing of the previous chapter.  Many of the same themes are present as Paul continues to talk about the same collection that is being taken for the church in Jerusalem.  Yet, where Paul was talking about the amount of giving in chapter 8, his focus shifts specifically to the attitude and heart of the giver here in chapter 9.

Paul points out in chapter 8 that the eagerness of the church in Corinth to give to this cause is a test of the sincerity of their love.  He then encourages them to give as they are able and even to go beyond that in some cases.

Here Paul points out once again that this is not a Law, and no one should give reluctantly, but rather, it should be done with a cheerful heart.  He draws on some themes from the book of Psalms here as well.  God does not desire sacrifice, the Psalmist writes in Psalm 51.  Rather, God desires a contrite heart, something that He would never turn down.

More important that the amount that is given is the attitude in which it is given.  In a world driven by money and material wealth, that is not always an easy thing for us to do.  We feel as though we have earned this money through our hard work, but what we fail to recognize is the blessing of God to bring us here in the first place.  God “supplies seed to the sower…”; He is always the primary mover in these things.  Everything that we have comes from Him and so, in an expression of thanksgiving to Him we give, joyfully thanking God for the blessings He has given us and trusting that He will continue to provide for our every need.



Romans 16 – Name Dropping

Read Romans 16

Paul almost universally ends all his letters with greetings and commendations to those at or around the intended destination of his letter.  The book of Romans contains the longest list of such people.  One might wonder why exactly this has become part of what we know as Scripture, God’s inspired Word when it seems to be much more personal in nature.

Yet embedded in these greetings and commendations are some final thoughts, conclusions, and warnings to the reader.  They almost feel out of place amongst the lists of names here.

Perhaps though, without saying it directly, Paul isn’t his readers to greet these people, but is actually commending them as those who are trustworthy, warning against others who may not be.  Each of the people Paul names he refers to as being in the “family,” or being hard workers.  In essence, their ‘loyalty,’ as it were, has been proven and they are trustworthy people to seek out.  This might be some of the earliest Christian networking that we know of.

The warning that Paul gives here though is not something that we should lightly pass over.  We are warned repeatedly, throughout Scripture, against those who would seek to divide and obstruct the ministry of the Gospel.  While Paul commends several to those in the church in Rome, he is also commending to us those in the church who are faithful workers, Christ followers, and wise leaders.

Sometimes we fall ito the trap of listening to the loudest voice, or following the person or group with the largest numbers.  Notice, Paul says nothing about these things.  Instead he speaks of those who are battle proven, whose lives have reflected the change that the Holy Spirit has put on their hearts.  Are these the type of people we gravitate toward?



Acts 27 – The Journey to Rome

Read Acts 27

Paul’s journey to Rome is not an easy one.  He traveled as a prisoner, which meant that little care was given to him.  Yet the centurion that was in charge of Paul seems to have some compassion for him, at least at first.

As the journey continues on, things get rougher for Paul and for all who are on board the ship.  Against Paul’s warning, they decide to leave the relative safety of one harbor for another that would be better for the ship.  This turns out to be disastrous.

Yet in the midst of all of this, the prisoner Paul becomes the voice of calm reassurance and salvation for all those on board this ill-fated voyage.   Ironically, this isn’t the first time a prisoner saved his captors.

Paul tells them the angel’s message, an encouragement if there ever was one in that moment, and then beckons them to eat, breaking bread in the same manner Jesus did at the last summer.  Though the situation seems bleak, God is abundantly present, protecting and providing for Paul and those traveling with them.

We are all called to different journeys in life as we follow God and live out our faith.  Some of these journeys are physical, some are spiritual, but all require us to listen and to obey.  Too often, when we run into difficulty, we think that we might be on the wrong track or that God has somehow abandoned us.  Yet it is clear here that Paul was right where God wanted him to be.

In our faith journey, we can take our cues from Paul here.  I’m sure he didn’t enjoy being tossed about in the boat, much less traveling as a prisoner.  However, he remained faithful through it all, trusting in God’s wisdom and providence.



Acts 22 – Paul's Story

Read Acts 22

I have heard it said that all we have to do is “tell our story.”  Leaders and pastors tell Christians this to communicate that there is no fancy degree or qualification that is needed to share your experience with God and what He is doing in your life.  This is incredibly true.

Far too often, Christians remain silent or are afraid to share with others because they feel that they “aren’t educated enough” or “won’t know what to say.”  The fact is that no one knows your story better than you and no one knows what God is doing in your life better than you (except God of course).

Here, Paul doesn’t actually share the Gospel as he had in other places.  Instead, he shares his experience of transformation and how his life was changed.  For this moment apparently, Paul felt that this was what God was directing him to say.

One thing that we don’t often here in the “tell your story encouragement” is what the results might be.  This, actually, is the reason why we don’t readily share things with others anyway; we don’t know what will happen.

In some accounts in Acts, people readily received the Gospel message in whatever form it was shared.  Yet here, the response is profoundly negative.  The crowds call for Paul’s death in a scene that looks markedly similar to Jesus’ trial.

Yet there is something we need to take into consideration here: God’s plan.  Paul’s testimony leads to a conversation about his citizenship.  This conversation ultimately leads to his journey to Rome.  That journey leads to countless people hearing the Gospel.

We may never know where one conversation leads, but we are still called to share and to trust God’s work in that moment and every one that follows.



Acts 21 – Faithful Return

Read Acts 21

Paul’s return to Jerusalem was not simply a stubborn desire of his own heart, but a directive by the Holy Spirit that he faithfully followed.  As he made his way home, many people warned him to stay away and begged him to not go.  They all knew that if he did show his face in Jerusalem, his “fate” would be sealed.

This really came as no surprise to Paul, though.  He was very aware of what would happen to him and actually welcomed it.  That is not to say that Paul welcomed death, but that he trusted God to faithfully be with him through whatever he would experience as he followed God’s calling on his life.

So what can we learn from Paul’s actions here?  If we believe that the Holy Spirit speaks to us through all Scripture, which God does do, then even in a historical account of Paul’s travels we can learn something.

Ultimately, Paul’s return set in motion a series of events that leads to his death in Rome.  Yet Rome was the end goal of Paul’s travels, as he attests to in both Acts and Romans.  He felt strongly that God was calling him there to witness, to strengthen the church there, and to present to Gospel to the highest governmental seats in the known world.  He knew that it wouldn’t be comfortable, but he was willing to go the distance for the sake of Christ.

How about you?  Typically God’s calling on our lives ends up making us uncomfortable; more so than we would like.  We talk a good “following God” talk, but in the walk that we walk we avoid situations that are uncomfortable, especially when it involves sharing our faith.  Perhaps we can learn from Paul’s trust and God’s faithfulness here?



Acts 20 – Encouraging Departure

Read Acts 20

There is a strong Biblical precedent set by leaders of God’s people to offer words of encouragement and warning at their final departure.  Moses offers this at the end of Deuteronomy, David at the end of 2 Samuel and the beginning of 1 Kings, and even Jesus at the end each Gospel and the beginning of Acts.  Paul’s words here follow this tradition and clearly come from a deep love and rich relationship he has with the church in Ephesus.

Paul’s words here are not just a warning for the church in Ephesus, but one that we can (and should) take to heart each day.  His concern for the church doesn’t come from a perception weak faith, but from a knowledge that the enemy is on the prowl and is merciless.

Essentially he is encouraging them to “hold on to what they have learned,” to “hold fast to the Word of God,” and to “be vigilant for those who would distort the Gospel Truth.”  Paul has seen and knows full well the power of the enemy and the desire to corrupt that Satan has.  Even from within the midst of the body he will exploit, confuse, pollute, and destroy if he has the chance.  We have seen this in our contemporary context, have we not?

Yet even Paul understands that, to hold fast in this fight, the strength of the Church does not rest on its own knowledge, its ability to remain relevant, her great teachers, or sound doctrine.  The strength of God’s people lies in their trust and faith in God.  Paul commits the Ephesian elders “to God and to the word of His grace.”  This too is where our faith and hope must lie if the Church is to weather the storms and attacks that come our way.



Matthew 11 – What you See and Hear

Read Matthew 11

Have you ever had something happen to you where you asked yourself, “Is this really happening?”  Maybe it’s a dream vacation, surprise birthday party, or a visit from a special person.  In any case, you enjoy the time, but there comes that “pinch me I think I’m dreaming” moment when we question reality.  This is also true in negative events; difficult diagnoses, the death of a someone close, and life changing events all make this list.

Sometimes we have trouble accepting what our eyes and ears tell us.  We either have trouble believing or we don’t want to, but eventually the reality of the situation sets in.

John the Baptist struggled with this and he was not alone.  Many saw Jesus perform miracles and struggled with doubt and disbelief.  Matthew, who has been writing so that the Jews would believe, calls out their lack of faith here.  Jesus quotes the Old Testament Scriptures regarding John and Himself, referencing the many signs the Messiah was supposed to perform, and yet still they do not believe.  He even points out that the people went out to see John in the wilderness because they thought he was a prophet, yet they still struggled to believe.

We are not that different are we?  For those of us raised in the church, conversations about faith, Scripture, and Jesus are quite normal.  Yet when it comes to belief in difficult situations, we find ourselves wavering a little, not sure if God can handle our situation.  Jesus responds to those thoughts: “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”  Jesus’ invitation to those people and us is to trust Him and believe what we have seen and heard; allow Him to be the Savior that He is.



Day 365: Revelation 20-22; The New Heaven and The New Earth

As we close this journey that we began a year ago, we come also to the final scenes of John’s vision in Revelation, and the final goal of what God has been working towards since the very beginning of this story.  This vision, this end purpose, the final will of God which we see in Revelation chapter 21, is that which we are told about in both our reading today and also that which we have heard about for for the past 364 days.  God’s ultimate goal, God’s overall will for creation has always been reconciliation… and that is what we see here today, reconciliation and restoration… a return to Eden, to paradise, to a time when all of creation lives in the presence of God for all time.

You see, what we read here today is the second high point of salvation history, the first being the salvation brought through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.  To think, though, that the scope of this salvation is limited simply to humans would be a gross understatement.  Sadly, however, this understanding of salvation is that which runs rampant in the church today and is perhaps a symptom some of the greatest misunderstandings of discussions about the end times and all that will take place.  For too often we’ve pared down Jesus’ salvation work to the saving of human souls so that they can go to heaven when they die.  Again, this is a sad understatement of God’s plan of salvation throughout the Bible.

This thinking, as I said, is held by many people and often leads to an “escapist” mentality of the end times.  Whether it be from natural death or the second coming of Christ, the prevailing opinion that seems to have taken mainstream Christianity by storm is that of the hope of “getting out of here” to be with Jesus.  Thinking like this has become rather prevalent in the idea of the rapture, the idea that Christian’s somehow get to be taken away from the earth in these last years so that they don’t have to endure the awful judgments and trials that are described in Revelation.  While one can understand the desire to not be around destruction of that magnitude, if indeed these are literal things that are going to happen on earth.

However, what is very clear here at the end of Revelation is that this escapist mentality is not what is described in the vision that is given to John.  In fact, it is not what has been shown for us throughout the whole of Scripture.  When sin entered the world, all of creation was affected, and the effect was systemic.  From that point on, God has been working His will through the people that He has called, to bring about the restoration of all creation, so that all things would be reconciled to Him.  How do we see this?  Because what is described to us in these final chapters is that of Heaven coming to a renewed and restored creation.

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more.  And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.  And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God.  He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” And he who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” Also he said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.”  And he said to me, “It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. To the thirsty I will give from the spring of the water of life without payment.  The one who conquers will have this heritage, and I will be his God and he will be my son.

There are several characteristics of this New Heaven and New Earth that we see here.  We hear the voice from heaven saying that “The dwelling of God is with men.”  More than this, in the words that follow John describes the New Jerusalem as being without a Temple.  This is interesting because the Temple was THE center of Jerusalem and the center of all religious life for the Hebrew people.  However, when the New Heaven and the New Earth are present, and God is dwelling with people, there is no need for a center of Worship because God will be the center of worship.  Jesus is the light and there is no need for the sun.  In short, God is the source of everything, the sustaining force of all that will be present in this new Eden.  I think this is even more interesting because this has been the Hebrew view of reality all along.  God is the center, the source, the completion of all being.  As John writes, “All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made.

From the beginning to the end, all things have been and continue to be through God.  He is the sustaining force of all creation and at the same time is working to redeem it, restore it, and reconcile it back to Himself.  This is the end of the story, the true end of all things… the conclusion of our journey both through Scripture and in life.  This is the fulfillment of the Covenant, the completion of the people being God’s people and He being their God.  This too is the truest and fullest realization of the Kingdom of Heaven as it comes to earth when the true King comes in all of His glory, splendor, and majesty on the day that only the Father knows.  Maranatha!  Come Lord Jesus.

He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!

The grace of the Lord Jesus be with all. Amen.

(I would like to mention, that the articles that I am referencing as “related” are those that have been suggested by wordpress and do not necessarily support of coincide with the beliefs that I hold or write about.  I neither cast my unknowing support to them nor do I say that they are wrong, simply conversational partners in this journey through the Scriptures.)



Day 362: Revelation 8-12; Trumpets, Witnesses, and a Great Battle

We talked a bit about judgment and wrath yesterday, however we did not speak of one important aspect to God’s wrath and God’s judgment, something that I think needs to be mentioned here as we continue in our journey to the end of all things.  If we think back to the prophets, we see the warnings of the impending doom that come from the mouths of the prophets, warnings of the judgment AND a call to turn to God, to repentance so that the judgment may be averted.  While many of these images are unique to the book of revelation, they do hold similarities to those warnings spoken by many of the prophets about the judgment that would take place on Israel, Judah, and Jerusalem.  Here too we see God working to get the attention of all people, working to call them to repentance that they may turn to Him and be saved.  The image of the trumpets then, is not one that is so strange as trumpets and horns have been used throughout the ages to communicate with and get peoples’ attention.

I’m kind of at a loss for words in what to write next.  As we are walked through the judgments we see a great number of people dying and horrible natural disasters.  There is this meteor that falls into the water of the earth called “wormwood” which is the  name of a very bitter plant.  It could be representative of the bitterness of God’s judgment.  We also see that only a portion of the world’s population was killed, which means that there are limits to the judgments that are being poured out, at least for the time being.

There is really so much to write about here in these five chapters, we see a number of angels and demons working in different ways.  The demons seem to be working to torture and tempt those still on earth, working against God to continue to keep humanity on its destructive and sinful paths.  The Angels also seem to be at work, warning humanity of its impending judgment, carrying out the work of the Lord.  We also see that there are “witnesses” that show up as well.  In the “Left Behind” series these witnesses are Elijah and Moses who come back to earth with supernatural powers.  Actually, many of the signs that they do are indicative of the things that both did while they lived on this earth.  They were also present at the transfiguration of Christ before He journeyed to Jerusalem and to His death.  It could also be symbolic of the witness of the Word of God to the people, the two could simply represent the Old and New Testaments.  In any case, these join with the work of the Angels and that of the believers in declaring the Word of the Lord and warning humanity of the impending judgments and encouraging them to believe in Jesus.

Finally today we come to a somewhat extended narrative in this vision about “the woman and the dragon.”  There is a lot that takes place in chapter 12 and we will be revisiting it in further chapters as well.  John says that “a great sign appeared in heaven.”  This sign was that of a woman that was dressed like the sun, and had a great deal of imagery about her that is similar to one of the dreams of Joseph way back in Genesis 37.  It is enough to say that with this imagery, most people think that she is representative of the people of God.  In fact, we have talked about Israel being represented in the Bible as a woman adorned for her bridegroom, who is God.  Here she is pregnant and gives birth to a Son, another image of Jesus present in Revelation.

The dragon is also there, ready to snatch up the baby, who we are told is “the one who is to rule all the nations…”  Many people associate this dragon with Satan, with the different heads and crowns and horns to represent his earthly rule over the kingdoms of the world.  Some have also seen this as an image of the Roman empire, or perhaps corrupt world governments in general throughout history.  However, what we see is that the powers of evil were working against the plan of God, trying to prevent the coming of Jesus and the salvation that He brings.  We saw this with Herod at Jesus birth and we tend to see it often in our lives with those that persecute Christians and repress the freedom to worship God.

The deeper imagery here is revealed in verse seven of chapter seven, of a great war that is going on between the angels of God and the dragon, the evil powers that would seek to enslave and destroy all things.  While we may be naive as to what is going on all around us, there is a great war that is being waged between good and evil, between God and Satan.  This is something we tend to dramatize, glorify, and even over emphasize.  I think though that the point here really is that we need to make sure that we are aware of what is going on around us in our world today.  Satan would have us believe that he doesn’t exist, that demons don’t exist, and that he is not working against us to bring about our destruction.  What John is showing us here is that there is definitely more to this world than what we see with our eyes.  This doesn’t necessarily give us the right to start attacking corrupt governments, destruction groups, or evil people, but rather to pray against them, pray for them, and ultimately trust that God is on our side and that He is fighting for us.

We see clearly that the dragon is defeated here.  He has been thrown out of heaven and though he is still on the earth seeking those that he may devour, his doom has been sealed and his final defeat assured.  It is only a matter of time really, which is yet another thing that John is communicating here.  Has he had been encouraging the churches with his letters, so to does he encourage them now by laying out this vision that we might persevere with the assurance that the end of this story has already been told, and that our victory is assured in Jesus Christ the only true King and ruler of this world.

(I would like to mention, that the articles that I am referencing as “related” are those that have been suggested by wordpress and do not necessarily support of coincide with the beliefs that I hold or write about.  I neither cast my unknowing support to them nor do I say that they are wrong, simply conversational partners in this journey through the Scriptures.)