2 Corinthians 9 – Cheerful Giving

Read 2 Corinthians 9

In a number of ways, 1 Corinthians 9 almost feels like a rehashing of the previous chapter.  Many of the same themes are present as Paul continues to talk about the same collection that is being taken for the church in Jerusalem.  Yet, where Paul was talking about the amount of giving in chapter 8, his focus shifts specifically to the attitude and heart of the giver here in chapter 9.

Paul points out in chapter 8 that the eagerness of the church in Corinth to give to this cause is a test of the sincerity of their love.  He then encourages them to give as they are able and even to go beyond that in some cases.

Here Paul points out once again that this is not a Law, and no one should give reluctantly, but rather, it should be done with a cheerful heart.  He draws on some themes from the book of Psalms here as well.  God does not desire sacrifice, the Psalmist writes in Psalm 51.  Rather, God desires a contrite heart, something that He would never turn down.

More important that the amount that is given is the attitude in which it is given.  In a world driven by money and material wealth, that is not always an easy thing for us to do.  We feel as though we have earned this money through our hard work, but what we fail to recognize is the blessing of God to bring us here in the first place.  God “supplies seed to the sower…”; He is always the primary mover in these things.  Everything that we have comes from Him and so, in an expression of thanksgiving to Him we give, joyfully thanking God for the blessings He has given us and trusting that He will continue to provide for our every need.



2 Corinthians 8 – Giving Ability

Read 2 Corinthians 8

This is the first of two chapters in which Paul addresses the practice of giving with the church in Corinth.  At this time, a collection was being taken for the church in Jerusalem who had come under a good deal of persecution from the Jews.  While they had remained faithful to the Gospel, it seems they had lost everything else and were quite poor.  And so, picking up on the themes of his parting words in 1 Corinthians 16, he urges them to prepare for a collection when Titus comes.

The Old Testament paradigm of giving was set forth in the law of Moses, giving a tenth of what you made and also giving the first fruits of what you had.  Whereas this sounds pretty stringent and binding, it is, like so much else in the Law, a description of what it means to live out our love for God by putting Him first in all things including material wealth.

But what Paul doesn’t do here is rehash the Old Testament Law about giving 10% of everything.  Instead, he commends the churches of Macedonia who gave as much as they were able and in some cases beyond their means as well.  Notice that there is not an amount associated with it, some number that they had to reach, but rather a recognition of the love that they have shown through their giving.

There are a number of religious denominations that claim to be Christian out there today who claim that there are number values associated with return blessings.  Only once you reach them will God bless you.  These are false teachings, heresies that distort the message of Scripture and God’s heart when it comes to giving.  God does not want your money; He doesn’t need it.  God wants our hearts, to place Him first in all things.  This is why Paul calls this giving a “test of the sincerity of your love.”  It is not the amount that matters, but the “earnestness, the joy, and the heart which matters as we give what we are able… and beyond.



1 Corinthians 16 – Final Instructions

Read 1 Corinthians 16

Today’s reading seems to be a great deal more context specific than the rest of the book.  As we talked about at the end of the book of Romans, however, even these parting words are a part of Scripture and are therefore useful and instructive to us.

Especially at the beginning of this chapter, Paul lays down some of the groundwork that has become the foundation for Christian giving practices throughout the last 2,000 years.  For him, giving was not always arbitrary or spontaneous, but rather a part of the Christian life as a response to the grace of God that is in Jesus Christ.

Spontaneous giving is not bad; certainly, Paul is not suggesting that.  However, when Paul picks up this topic again, we will see that giving is grounded in the Christian life and therefore is something we are intentional about, especially when it comes to giving back to God.

Now, this may seem oddly self-serving coming from a pastor.  It is important for us, and especially for me, to be truthful and honest when it comes to what Scripture says about this.  Paul, actually, did not receive money from the church.  In fact, he was a “tent maker,” holding a job for some time in order to fund his own work.  So when he speaks about this, he is not talking about it from some self-interested point of view but rather as a continuing application to what it means for us to live in our freedom in Christ.

No longer do we have to live, concerned for what we need, God will take care of us.  We have been freed from those concerns.  No longer do we need to hoard our possessions to take care of ourselves.  We are freed from those concerns.  God has shown time and again, His faithfulness and provision in all things and so, as we turn to Him in faith we also trust Him with our lives knowing that He who has created all things is more than able to care for and provide for all that we need.



Mark 12 – The Greatest Gift

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Sermons on giving and tithing are probably the most difficult sermons to preach and to hear.  I think that, at least on some level, they seem somewhat self-serving coming from the pastor and that can often get in the way of how we listen and hear the Spirit moving in that time.  Jesus takes on this subject, though, without hesitation, and does not flinch at pointing out the truth in giving: it too is a matter of the heart.

Watching all of the people giving their offerings, Jesus reflects on what He sees.  Many people giving large sums of money.  Their offerings would have made loud noises as coins were placed into the containers.  Many would have known what they were doing and the large amounts that they were giving.

Yet I am reminded of what Jesus says in Matthew 6, talking about our posture when we seek to be obedient to God through fasting, praying, and giving.  In each subject, those who do things publically, drawing attention to themselves “receive their reward in full.”  Perhaps, Jesus is thinking about Psalm 51, that the truer sacrifice is that of the heart.

Jesus points out the widow’s offering to His disciples, one given in humility, with no fanfare or self-promotion.  She gives all she has; truly the greatest gift anyone can give.

I wonder if there is any relationship here between the gift that this widow gave and that which Jesus was about to give?  His gift, that of His own life, came in a form not expected by the religious leaders and yet it was the greatest gift of all.  John writes, referencing Jesus, “Greater love has no one than this: that he/she lay down their life for a friend.”  Maybe, more important than tithing, is self-sacrificially loving our neighbor?