Acts 26 – Defense to Agrippa

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This is not the first time that we have heard Paul use his story as a defense against the accusations brought against him.  However, this particular moment records something very interesting that perhaps we tend to overlook.  As Paul began to follow Christ he didn’t turn his back on the teaching of the Old Testament.  In fact, at this point, 25 years into his ministry, he was not guilty of breaking the law and traditions of the Jewish people, at least not the ones that they religious leaders are accusing him of.

Paul’s understanding of Jesus comes from a deep knowledge of the Old Testament Scriptures, the only “Bible” that they had at that time.  He understands that, as he is a witness to Jesus Christ and the Gospel of the resurrection, the best witness to that among the Jews is to hold well the Old Testament Scriptures that point to Jesus as the Messiah.

Sometimes I think we too readily throw the Old Testament aside.  We think that because Jesus came, and because He represents a New Covenant, the old stuff doesn’t matter any longer.

While it is true that Jesus fulfilled the Law and through Him we have freedom from it, perhaps we shouldn’t be so quick to cast aside the Old Testament teachings.  All of Scripture points to Jesus Christ as the Messiah.  The sacrificial system that was in place helps us to make sense of the need for Jesus’ sacrifice.  The Passover has a direct correlation and brings deep meaning to the sacrifice of Jesus.  The Law shows us our need for a savior.

Do you want to know Jesus better?  Read the Old Testament and see how it foreshadows the coming Messiah and the salvation, reconciliation, redemption, light, and renewed relationship to the world.



Acts 25 – Trial #2: Festus

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When governor Felix is succeeded by governor Festus, the Jews waste no time in coming to him and bringing the charges they have against Paul.  No doubt they have been working hard make these charges sound much worse than they actually are.  Sadly, though, it seems that in two years, they still are unable to convince the governor that Paul has done anything seriously wrong; certainly nothing that warrants death by any means.

However, here we see politics come into play.  Governor Felix had “won” the hearts of the Jewish people through years of extended peace in which they had a good deal of freedom to live and practice their religion within the Roman Empire.  Festus had no such advantage and so, seeking to gain one, he is willing to go against Roman law to gain some Jewish brownie points.

Paul, though, will have none of it.  He has been held without conviction for the past two years and it’s pretty clear that he isn’t planning on going back to Jerusalem and so he does the one thing that he knows will get him on the way to Rome: he appeals to Caesar.

For Paul, heavenly standing with God is always more important than earthly citizenship.  He knew his identity was in Christ and that is what always came first for him.  Yet there are times when our worldly titles and positions can be an advantage to us as well.  Here, Paul once again takes advantage of his Roman citizenship, something the Jewish leaders cannot do.  This was a privilege reserved only for Roman citizens.

It is important to remember the order of identity here.  Paul has been appealing as a follower of Christ; this always comes first.  Sometimes I wonder if American Christians today get that backward.



Acts 24 – The Two Year Trial

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Paul’s first official Roman trial begins with a man named Felix, a governor over the region in which Jerusalem was a part.  When the Jewish religious leaders arrive, they present “charges” against Paul that coincide with his missionary journies throughout the Roman Empire.  Interestingly, though, if we were to read back over Paul’s journeys, we would see very quickly that it was actually the fault of the Jews in each of the cities where Paul was that riots broke out.

One thing that is missing from this chapter is the history of the Jews and the Roman Empire, and why the question of riots was so important.  The Jews were not a willing people when it came to Roman subjugation.  Throughout the rule of both the Greeks and the Romans, the Jews rioted and revolted constantly resulting in a Roman garrison being set up in Jerusalem.  Many soldiers were stationed there in an effort to keep this peace.  Being accused as a “troublemaker” and someone who “stirs up riots” was a big deal; the Romans had no patience for it.

But Paul’s defense leaves little doubt that these charges are, at best, incomplete, and lack the proper witnesses for the accusations that are being brought.

I have to wonder what Paul was thinking as the days, weeks, and months in Caesarea wore on.  He stayed with Governor Felix for two whole years, all the while being questioned in hopes that Paul would slip up.  He never did.

So for two years Paul waited to move on to the next step of the journey that would lead him to Rome.  It must have seemed like an eternity to him.  Yet during this time, God was setting the stage, preparing both Paul and those he would encounter along the way.