Ephesians 5:21-6:9 "Patterned After Christ"

The language of submission is not popular in the prevailing culture of the 21st century, and with good reason. The words of Scripture have been twisted and distorted to defend abuse and many other sinful actions and attitudes. Yet the word “submit,” can also be translated as “value,” and draws its deep meaning from the image of mutual submission and mutual valuing from the relationship of God in the Trinity. Each looking to the other, valuing the other, submitting to the other in a perfect, loving relationship.

Philippians 2:3-4 says, “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.” On Father’s Day, we might typically hear sermons challenging fathers towards greater valuing of their families (which is certainly important). Today, however, we are all challenged to a greater valuing of others, whether biological family, faith family, or our neighbors all around us looking to Jesus as our pattern and guide.

What are some things that I value in my own life? How do I show that in how I live each day?

What are some of the main values that Scripture encourages for Christians? How do we see Jesus Christ modeling them in His life?

Does my life reflect the values that Jesus modeled in His life and ministry, those set down in Scripture, or do I value my own interests? How can I continue to be, or change toward being more in line with what Christ calls me to?



Hell? H.C. Question 44

Why does the creed add, “He descended to hell”?

Isaiah 53 – 

Who has believed our message
    and to whom has the arm of the Lord been revealed?
He grew up before him like a tender shoot,
    and like a root out of dry ground.
He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him,
    nothing in his appearance that we should desire him.
He was despised and rejected by mankind,
    a man of suffering, and familiar with pain.
Like one from whom people hide their faces
    he was despised, and we held him in low esteem.

Surely he took up our pain
    and bore our suffering,
yet we considered him punished by God,
    stricken by him, and afflicted.
But he was pierced for our transgressions,
    he was crushed for our iniquities;
the punishment that brought us peace was on him,
    and by his wounds we are healed.
We all, like sheep, have gone astray,
    each of us has turned to our own way;
and the Lord has laid on him
    the iniquity of us all.

He was oppressed and afflicted,
    yet he did not open his mouth;
he was led like a lamb to the slaughter,
    and as a sheep before its shearers is silent,
    so he did not open his mouth.
By oppression and judgment he was taken away.
    Yet who of his generation protested?
For he was cut off from the land of the living;
    for the transgression of my people he was punished.
He was assigned a grave with the wicked,
    and with the rich in his death,
though he had done no violence,
    nor was any deceit in his mouth.

Yet it was the Lord’s will to crush him and cause him to suffer,
    and though the Lord makes his life an offering for sin,
he will see his offspring and prolong his days,
    and the will of the Lord will prosper in his hand.
After he has suffered,
    he will see the light of life and be satisfied;
by his knowledge my righteous servant will justifymany,
    and he will bear their iniquities.
Therefore I will give him a portion among the great,
    and he will divide the spoils with the strong,
because he poured out his life unto death,
    and was numbered with the transgressors.
For he bore the sin of many,
    and made intercession for the transgressors.

Matthew 26:36-46 – Then Jesus went with his disciples to a place called Gethsemane, and he said to them, “Sit here while I go over there and pray.” He took Peter and the two sons of Zebedee along with him, and he began to be sorrowful and troubled. Then he said to them, “My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death. Stay here and keep watch with me.”

Going a little farther, he fell with his face to the ground and prayed, “My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from me. Yet not as I will, but as you will.”

Then he returned to his disciples and found them sleeping. “Couldn’t you men keep watch with me for one hour?” he asked Peter. “Watch and pray so that you will not fall into temptation. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.”

He went away a second time and prayed, “My Father, if it is not possible for this cup to be taken away unless I drink it, may your will be done.”

When he came back, he again found them sleeping, because their eyes were heavy. So he left them and went away once more and prayed the third time, saying the same thing.

Then he returned to the disciples and said to them, “Are you still sleeping and resting? Look, the hour has come, and the Son of Man is delivered into the hands of sinners. Rise! Let us go! Here comes my betrayer!”

Matthew 27:45-46 – From noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”).

Luke 22:44 – And being in anguish, he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat was like drops of blood falling to the ground.

Hebrews 5:7-10 – During the days of Jesus’ life on earth, he offered up prayers and petitions with fervent cries and tears to the one who could save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverent submission. Son though he was, he learned obedience from what he suffered and, once made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him and was designated by God to be high priest in the order of Melchizedek.



1 Peter 3 – Eager

Read 1 Peter 3

I don’t wish to ignore a portion of today’s reading, but we have talked about the language that is used here, the language of submission, in other portions of our walk through the New Testament.  It is important to note here that, on top of using this “submission” language, which we have said could be replaced with the word “value,” and should always be read with the idea that husbands and wives are called to mutual submission in the same way that they submit to Christ, here Peter takes it a step further to talk about the potential benefits and outcomes of acting in this way.  Our spouses could be won over, coming to know Christ, because of our actions!  As always, it is important to say here that this is not an encouragement to stay in abusive or dangerous relationships.  I do not believe that Scripture ever meant for that to happen and that those who twist Scripture for their own defense in this matter are wrong.

Aside from, but related to that is the following topic on “doing good.”  Peter encourages his readers once again to continue to do good in the midst of whatever suffering that they might encounter.  He even goes so far as to suggest that we should be “eager” to do good.

As I continue to think about the election this week and the results that have come from it, I wonder about what we are “eager” to do.  It seems like a lot of us are eager to get into meaningless arguments on social media, publically injuring our own witness and that of the church through unfriendly, unloving, and divisive speech.  It seems that we are eager to judge our friends and neighbors for their political affiliations and reactions to the events of late.  It seems that we are much more readily willing to allow the things of this world dissuade us the hope that we have in Jesus Christ.



Ephesians 5 – Mutual Submission

Read Ephesians 5

Ahhh, that great chapter on marriage.  Much of what Paul has been talking about continues in the first section of this chapter, living the life that God has called us to live, showing love to each other as Christ has shown His love to us.

Paul then moves on to a more specific application looking at specific relationships; husband and wife, parent and child, slave and master (or perhaps a more contemporary translation, employee and employer).  Each one of these relationship examples is a practical application of living out the Christian life, or as Paul writes, “Submit to one another out of reverence for Christ.”

All of it finds its credence in the first section as Paul explains what he means using the example of the marriage relationship.  None of this “submission” is meant to create power gaps or abusive relationships, but rather it takes its cue from Jesus Christ who is the example of what true love and submission mean.

Contrary to what some believe, this is one of the most beautiful images of marriage in which both individuals are actively placing the other higher than themselves.  The language of submission is not popular in today’s world because it has been abused by so many and led to a great deal of hurt.  We also don’t like to be told to or involved in actively making ourselves vulnerable.  Certainly, it was never God’s intent or purpose to place people in abusive situations.

That said, when this idea of submitting to each other, to actively loving and valuing the other above our own interests is lived out, taking its cue from Christ, the result is a beautiful relationship and a tangible image of the love that God has for us.

The marriage relationship is one that uniquely images Christ’s love for us.

This, then, can be seen in the other relationships that Paul mentions in the beginning of the next chapter as well, all dictated by the language of mutual submission… or placing a higher value on the needs of others rather than our own.