Luke 1 – History

Read Luke 1

Every story needs a context, and for Luke, who was not an eye-witness to Jesus’ life, miracles, or any of the events that took place, the context is extremely important because it provides and introduction to Jesus’ coming.  While Luke’s audience was largely Gentile, it is clear that he has a firm grasp on Jewish history and draws from that history to set the stage for Jesus’ coming.

There are many parallels between Luke 1 and Old Testament events.  Zechariah and Elizabeth have a child, though they are quite old, just like Abraham and Sarah.  That child is to be set apart, like the Priests and many other prophets of the Old Testament.

Both the song of Zechariah and Mary’s song, known as the Magnificat, draw heavily on old testament passages including 1 Samuel 2:1-10, Isaiah 9 & 40, Ezekiel 29, Jeremiah 23 & 31, Micah 7, Malachi 4, and about 20 different Psalms.  Luke is clearly drawing the Old Testament Scriptures forward knowing that, while God declares that He is “doing a new thing,” in Isaiah 43, that new thing is not wholly different from how God had acted in the past but is intimately related to the continuing work of God to bring about redemption, restoration, and reconciliation to a fallen world.

All of this history falls right in line with the charge of John the Baptist too, preparing the way for the Lord.  It wasn’t something that began specifically with John, but had been going on for thousands of years prior to this moment.

God’s work in our lives doesn’t begin at the moment we recognize He has been working on us.  We too can take a look back over what we have experienced and see that God has been working on us since the beginning and continues to do so through the Holy Spirit each and every day.



Mark 14 – Why the Waste?

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Admittedly there have been times in my life where I have seen people do things or give money where I wondered, “why waste time/money on that?”  Like the disciples, we think we know where other’s priorities should be and what they should be doing with the things God has blessed them with.

However, Mary’s actions here, Jesus points out, have a much deeper significance than what they saw on the surface: preparation.

In the sequence of events unfold here at the end of Jesus’ life, there is a great deal of parallelism between His sacrifice and the Passover feast.  What we don’t get here is that, when the Priests prepared for these events, there was a considerable amount of preparation and washing that needed to take place so they would be clean.  There was also specific things that needed to be done by each family to prepare the Passover meal which included what needed to be done to the Passover Lamb.

Jesus Himself is our Passover Lamb, the one who would die and whose blood would cover our sins and grant us eternal life.  Jesus functions in the position of the priest, performing the sacrifice before God in representation of all humanity.  In both cases, Mary’s actions serve as preparation for what was about to take place.

It is important for us to be willing to open our eyes to a bigger picture.  We don’t always know what God is up to when we see people do things that we wouldn’t necessarily agree with.  Why give so much to a university when you could give to the church or the poor?  What if that money went to a scholarship for someone who came to know Jesus through a campus ministry?  It wouldn’t seem so wasteful then would it?