John 11 – Raising the Dead

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It’s hard to imagine that a miracle so great as raising someone from the dead warrants the harsh reaction of the religious leaders that we see here.  But for them, it was the last straw.  It isn’t entirely clear here why it comes down to this, but in the end, they put forth a plot to capture and kill Jesus.  For John’s Gospel, this is the turning point in Jesus ministry, the divide between the book of signs and the book of glory.

Yet even in the midst of all the scheming and plotting, God’s will and plan are still being worked out.  Remember in Matthew 27, when the people screamed for Jesus’ blood to “be on us and on our children”?  Here we see yet another irony as Caiaphas speaks to the current predicament: “it is better for you that one man die for the people than that the whole nation perish.”  Little does he know how right he is.

All of this, as Jesus often reminds us, has to happen for His glory to be revealed.  As we begin to shift our focus from Jesus’ earthly ministry to His glorification on the cross, we need to keep in mind the recurring themes that John infuses into His writing.  First, Jesus is the light of the world, the one who gives true sight, but the world hates the light and does not recognize it.  The Pharisees are still in the dark here.

Second, and more importantly, Jesus is the great I AM, and the way that this is going is, as He reminds us here, the only way… He is the only way for life, freedom, and true sight.  As Jesus moves forward now, His actions will expand the resurrection from local, one man, to a universal reality.



Matthew 27 – Irony

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I’ve read and heard about Jesus’ death a countless number of times in my life.  However, in reading this today, I am struck by the repeated irony in all that was said to and about Jesus during the process of his conviction and crucifixion.  Matthew does not record Jesus’ request to the Father for the forgiveness of those who did this to Him, but truly the did not know anything about what they did.

The people cry out that Jesus’ “blood be on us and our children.”  Little do they know how much they truly want that to be true.

The soldiers bow down before Jesus and say “Hail, King of the Jews.”  Little do they know how they will be doing that for real one day.

The people walking by, beckoning Him to come down from the cross if He “truly is the Son of God.”  Little do they know that this is right where the Son of God needed to be.

The religious leaders chide that they will believe if Jesus comes down from the cross.  They mock Jesus for trusting in God.  Little do they know the trust that Jesus had for the plan of salvation being carried out at that very moment.

It wasn’t until Jesus’ last breath when all this had taken place that one man, a soldier guarding Jesus’ cross, recognizes the truth of Jesus’ identity.  But that acclimation wasn’t too late, it was the beginning of billions of faith professions that would follow since that day.

Once again we are reminded that God’s ways are not our ways.  Even when we think we know how God should act, we must submit our trust to God whose ways and love are far higher and greater than we could ever ask or imagine.