Deuteronomy 30:11-14; 32:45-47 "That You May Have Life"

Moses exhorts the people of Israel to remember and be in the Word of God.  It is not too difficult to know; it is not far off.  God’s Word is very near to them, and to us as well.  We need to Engage the Word, to know the voice of the Shepherd, and we will then see the transformative work of the Holy Spirit.



Psalm 119:105-112 "Light for the Path"

1/17/2016 – Engage the WORD – There are times when our path seems clear and times when it seems cloudy and dark. In those times, we need to turn to God’s Word to give us light, maybe not to illuminate the whole path, but at least enough for the next step.



Day 304: Luke 19-20; Questions… Questions…

We talked a while back about Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem and about His ministry in Jerusalem throughout the last days of His life on earth.  So today, I would like to focus on the questions that Jesus fields from the religious leaders.  While today I am referring to a very particular section of of Luke 20 in which the religious leaders are challenging the authority of Jesus, I think that most of the questions from the religious leaders towards Jesus would fit into this category save those from Nicodemus in the book of John.

So Jesus has entered the city of Jerusalem in a rather humbly triumphant manner and has gone into the Temple and cleansed it, driving out all of the people that were in there buying and selling, cheating many for the sake of religion.  The religious leaders did not like this so they devised a way to trap Jesus by “asking” Him a question.  Their motive?  To try and trap Jesus publicly so that they could “de-frock” Him and thus remove Him from prominence.  There is an even deeper goal here I think, and its one that we often share with these religious leaders.  This goal is also one that is shared by those that are not believers, in order to trick Christians into saying specific things.  What is this goal?  They want to be right… or at the very least for Jesus to be wrong.  They want to catch Jesus to prove that the way they believe is correct.

You may be thinking to yourself, “I don’t do that at all.”  But I think that if we are honest with ourselves, we do this with God all the time.  Whether we read our Bibles or just go to worship on Sunday mornings, we want to know that what we are doing is good (or at the very least okay).  If we read in the Bible or hear the pastor say that we should not hate our brother because it is just like murdering our brother, do we not often say, “well its not exactly like murder” or “I don’t really hate them, I just strongly dislike them.”  We justify our actions as a way of making ourselves feel okay about the way we are living.  We don’t want to feel guilty and we certainly don’t want to change, so we justify ourselves in our own minds.

We often do this with pastors as well.  In come classes that I have taken at seminary, I have witnessed some of my peers try to justify their own beliefs in front of pastors and professors by twisting their words or tweaking their statements so that they will be okay with what is being said.  In the same way, I have seen people go to their pastor and even had people come to be that try to justify their sinful actions by talking about how the context of a particular passage clearly means that what they did in the present is not what the Bible meant.  What they want to hear is that their sinful actions, their way of believing is good enough… what they want is cheap discipleship… cheap faith.

I think the greater world does this a lot too, posing questions like the ones Jesus is asked to the Church in an effort to somehow get a religious pass for immoral or unjust action.  To be honest, I think that the Church has long been silent about a lot of things, refusing to answer and thus affirming the direction that culture is going.  Sure we speak up every now and then on hot-button issues, but do we really care about the deep day-to-day living of those around us?  Do we really want to stand idly by while our friends and neighbors plunge deeper into darkness?  We need to have an answer for these questions… we need to have an answer for the culture.

What is Jesus’ answer here?  Well, He turns the question on its head and throws it back at the religious leaders.  He is well aware of their intent and traps them in their trap.  However, earlier and later in His ministry, even in our reading today, Jesus references time and again the words of Scripture in His answers.  Jesus doesn’t need to come up with a new and creative answer for the time because He has the Word of God inside of Him.  It is close to His heart and deep in His mind and at any time He can pull it out at any time.  Not just His favorite verses that have little meaning, but all of Scripture at all times.  Are we familiar with the Word of God in this way?  Do we have answers for the questions that the world poses to us?  Do we have answers to the simple questions?  Can we back them up with Scripture?  Are these words truly our life, as Moses says to the people of Israel in Deuteronomy, or are they just idle words that pass in and out of our ears.  We need to recover the Word of God in our hearts and on our minds that we may answer the questions for ourselves and for others!



Day 215: Isaiah 58-60; Authentic Actions

Today’s reading starts out with a subject that is near and dear to my heart.  As a worship leader, I spend a rather large time thinking about Christian worship and the actions behind it.  Moreover, I don’t just think about what we do, but why we are doing it and how we are doing it.  Are the things that we do on a Sunday morning (and I speak of Sunday morning because our corporate worship is a reflection of our worship in day to day living) actually bringing us into an encounter with God.  Are the songs that we sing, the actions that we take, the posture that we assume all things that are bringing us closer to God?  Or are the simply the things that we all feel like we are doing?  Are we just taking these actions because we’ve always taken these actions… is tradition actually the god we are worshiping?  Are we more concerned about whether we like the song… the beat… the instruments?

In many ways, this is a question that has been asked of the people of Israel, God’s chosen, for many hundreds of years, and is one that is focused in on when it comes to the prophets.  If you remember back to the narrative history, there were a lot of things that pulls the people away from the Lord.  No matter what it was though, it all wound up being idolatry because it pulled them away from worshiping the Lord.  Interestingly enough though, we don’t hear of these things creeping in by way of the Temple.  No, usually corporate worship is the last thing to be affected by the actions of Satan as he tries to lead us astray.  It starts of with little things at home.  Busy schedules lead to a desire for ‘me time,’ not that me time is bad but it does often tread the line of selfishness.  Selfishness has a tendency to snowball into a lifestyle of ‘me-centered activity’ which then ends up showing up in how we worship, wanting songs that fit our style of music and sermons that are about what we want to hear.  Christians today “church shop” until they find the church that is “just right for them.”  Culture doesn’t help this at all because we live in a very individualistic society where we can have anything we want at any time…  Sound familiar?

Yet they seek me daily
    and delight to know my ways,
as if they were a nation that did righteousness
    and did not forsake the judgment of their God;
they ask of me righteous judgments;
    they delight to draw near to God.
‘Why have we fasted, and you see it not?
    Why have we humbled ourselves, and you take no knowledge of it?’
Behold, in the day of your fast you seek your own pleasure,
    and oppress all your workers.
Behold, you fast only to quarrel and to fight
    and to hit with a wicked fist.
Fasting like yours this day
    will not make your voice to be heard on high.
Is such the fast that I choose,
    a day for a person to humble himself?
Is it to bow down his head like a reed,
    and to spread sackcloth and ashes under him?
Will you call this a fast,
    and a day acceptable to the Lord?

While there are a myriad of other things we could look into as far as idols go, the fact is that how we worship corporately is a reflection of how (and what) we worship individually.  God addresses this head on here (and in many other places in the Bible as well) pointing out that what the Israelites were doing was so self focused that it meant nothing to Him.  Even their worship had become about them.  The writer is addressing fasting in chapter 58, but fasting is an element of worship, a way of humbling oneself before God.  Yet it is clear that the people of Israel missed the mark, as we too are missing the mark.  God goes on to say,

Is not this the fast that I choose:
    to loose the bonds of wickedness,
    to undo the straps of the yoke,
to let the oppressed go free,
    and to break every yoke?
Is it not to share your bread with the hungry
    and bring the homeless poor into your house;
when you see the naked, to cover him,
    and not to hide yourself from your own flesh?
Then shall your light break forth like the dawn,
    and your healing shall spring up speedily;
your righteousness shall go before you;
    the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard.
Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer;
    you shall cry, and he will say, ‘Here I am.’
If you take away the yoke from your midst,
    the pointing of the finger, and speaking wickedness,
if you pour yourself out for the hungry
    and satisfy the desire of the afflicted,
then shall your light rise in the darkness
    and your gloom be as the noonday.
And the Lord will guide you continually
    and satisfy your desire in scorched places
    and make your bones strong;
and you shall be like a watered garden,
    like a spring of water,
    whose waters do not fail.
And your ancient ruins shall be rebuilt;
    you shall raise up the foundations of many generations;
you shall be called the repairer of the breach,
    the restorer of streets to dwell in.

The Church today is falling victim to a selfish and individualistic culture.  The ‘Worship Wars’ that took place and are still taking place are just an example of this.  Churches divided because of selfish desires.  Congregations that are worshiping separate just to keep people happy that they can have “their own music.”  The right had of the body is trying to eat while the left had is covering the mouth.  The left foot is trying to walk while the right leg drags behind.  We need to get beyond ourselves and seek after God once again… is your church’s worship centered on God?  Or is it about keeping people happy?  Is your worship centered on God?  Or are you only concerned with keeping yourself happy?