1 John 3 – What Great Love!

Read 1 John 3

John continues his emphasis on love, now turning to the love that God has shown us in Jesus Christ.  Whereas in chapter two, John was giving direction on who and how to love, as well as where not to place our love, now he shows the example of perfect love that comes only from God.

God’s infinite love is beyond amazing.  Far too often we talk about it in a limited fashion, referencing it simply to the forgiveness or sins, or God not getting mad at us when we don’t live the way He calls us to.  Both of those are true statements but fail to get anywhere close to the far-reaching depth of God’s love.

Through the love of God shown in Jesus Christ, we aren’t just given a free pass, God actually adopts us as His own, calling us His children and, as Scripture says, making us heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ.  Our old self, the sinful dirty part of us, is put to death, washed away, and completely covered Jesus Christ, whom God sees when He looks at us.

There is very intentional imagery being used here because it gets at the importance and intimacy of the relationship that develops here as well.  God is the loving Father who lavishes love on His Son and on us as those who are marked with His Son’s blood.

In response to this, John writes, we should love one another.  When he says this, he is using the same form of the word “love,” meaning that our love for each other should be modeled after God’s love for us.  This is supposed to be the foundation for our relationships with each other in the Christian community and with all of those we come in contact with.

It is enough to say that we fail at this often.  But John also offers a reminder and an encouragement that we have hope in God, that He is greater than our sins, and both forgives us and works to build into us and shape us more into the image of His Son.



1 Corinthians 14 – Good Worship

Read 1 Corinthians 14

For someone who talks a lot about freedom, Paul sure does spend a lot of time giving direction about having good order in worship.  This is an important section in Paul’s letter, though, not just for them, but for us as well.

He begins by grounding what we do in worship in the deep love of God that he just expressed in chapter 13.  This is the deep, “Agape” love that Jesus showed us by dying for us and loving us unconditionally.  Once again, Paul is pointing out that, while we have freedom in Christ, that freedom should always be directed outward in consideration of others.

The application here, then, is worship.  How are we to worship God in response to what Paul has explained here?  Simply put, worship needs to happen in good order so that the body of Christ may be built up.  If worship is chaotic and unintelligible, with people using their spiritual gifts as a display for themselves, nothing is accomplished and believers, especially new believers, would find themselves confused and perhaps even put off.

There are a number of reasons for this.  Paul is making sure that Christian worship doesn’t represent the temple cult worship of pagan gods, which was often chaotic and full of self-promoting displays.  This is one of the reasons Paul encourages prophecy over speaking in tongues as well.  People speaking unintelligibly in worship helps no one and may even serve as a way of judging others; those who speak in tongues being “more spiritual” than those who don’t.

In all of this, however, Paul says that we need to show our love.  Good worship is worship that honors God and therefore edifies the church.  Building each other up is an act of love, placing our own needs and desires aside for the sake of our brothers and sisters.  If we all truly did this today, we’d probably stop arguing about music styles and experience an abundance of worship renewal.



1 Corinthians 13 – True Love

Read 1 Corinthians 13

This chapter is a rather popular one for weddings, and rightly so.  When we talk about vowing to God and to each other it is this deep, self-sacrificial love that we steep ourselves in.  But actually, Paul didn’t write this passage with weddings in mind.  His thoughts here are the apex of his discourse here about how we treat others, how we use the gifts of the spirit, and the foundation of the life of Christ in general.

At the end of chapter 12, Paul says he will “show them the most excellent way.”  In fact, he has been doing this all throughout his writing.  All this time he has been talking about using your freedom, steeped in the love of Christ, in consideration of others.  Here, he describes in detail what this looks like.

In the original Greek language that the New Testament was written in, there were three ways in which the word “love” was used.  There is “eros,” the sort of romantic, erotic love that we often think about within the context of relationships and sex, “philos,” the brotherly love of friends and family, and “Agape,” the deep, self-sacrificial love that is used here in 1 Corinthians 13.  This “agape” love is used only when in reference to God’s love, to the love of Jesus Christ the led Him to the cross to die for us, and to the love that we are called to exhibit as those who are “in Christ Jesus,” as it is described here.

The love that is described here is also the foundation for the appropriate use of the gifts of the spirit as well as a description of our appropriate conduct in worship, subjects that bookend this chapter.  And this love grows, as we mature and are sanctified, our love in Christ grows deeper as our hearts beat more and more in sync with God’s own heart as well.