Day 349: 2 Timothy 1-4; Pastoral Advice and Admonition

The second letter to Timothy, if written by Paul, was probably one of the last letters that Paul wrote before he died in Rome.  This letter is also probably one of the most personal letters that Paul writes, displaying his passion for desire for the continued spread of the Gospel and the success of the Church after he dies.  Paul, or the Pauline Writer, is encouraging his readers to continue to be faithful to the Word of God and to spread the Gospel of Christ Jesus, guarding against the myriad of other teachings that were emerging and seeking to corrupt the church.

Therefore do not be ashamed of the testimony about our Lord, nor of me his prisoner, but share in suffering for the gospel by the power of God, who saved us and called us to a holy calling, not because of our works but because of his own purpose and grace, which he gave us in Christ Jesus before the ages began, and which now has been manifested through the appearing of our Savior Christ Jesus, who abolished death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel, for which I was appointed a preacher and apostle and teacher, which is why I suffer as I do. But I am not ashamed, for I know whom I have believed, and I am convinced that he is able to guard until that Day what has been entrusted to me.  Follow the pattern of the sound words that you have heard from me, in the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus.  By the Holy Spirit who dwells within us, guard the good deposit entrusted to you.

Paul goes on to talk about not only being unashamed of the Gospel, but to also remember the one who called you.  I am reminded here of a song by Big Daddy Weave called “Audience of One.”  This song talks about worshiping as if there is only one person there, God.  Paul talks about this same idea when it comes to the work that Timothy is doing in the Church.  He says things like “No soldier gets entangled in civilian pursuits, since his aim is to please the one who enlisted him.  An athlete is not crowned unless he competes according to the rules.  It is the hard-working farmer who ought to have the first share of the crops.”  He also says later in chapter two, “Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.

Finally, Paul talks a great deal about the nature of the Scriptures.  He talks about how important it is in leading a godly life.  What I find interesting is that he links the importance of Scripture and the persecution that he endured.  Paul says right after this that “all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted.”  I think this is a very important link for us as we look at our own lives and the struggles and ‘persecutions’ we face day in and day out.  Paul continues, “But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.  All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.

When we face down evil in this world, whether it be struggles in our own lives or the many issues going on in the greater world around us, we cannot disconnect the importance of the Scriptures in our lives as a a guide and as that which builds us up, prepares us, and equips us.  The Word of God is not just some self-help book, nor does it fall under the category of “sacred writings” as Paul says, but it is a companion, something that goes with us… something that should in inside of us.  There have been many instances in Scripture where the reference of the Word of God has been that of “digestion” or “eating,” and this is the type of thing that Paul is referring to.  He isn’t simply encouraging Timothy to just read it, but to get it inside of himself that it may become part of him.  In that way, no matter what is faced in life, God’s Word will be an intimate part of how he deals with it.

As addendum to this, Paul encourages Timothy to preach the Word of God always.  He says, “be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching.”  There is no time when the Word of God should not be spoken, not be preached, and is not useful for learning, teaching, and the building up of the Church.  This is why we preach the Word on Sunday, because it is part of who we are as the Body of Christ.  Our lives revolve around the Word of God as we live in response to the grace that He has shown us.  Americans tend to segment their lives in this respect, keeping church at church and work at work and home at home.  But for the follower of Jesus Christ, it is the Word of God that pervades all of these areas of life, encouraging and admonishing us in whatever places we find ourselves.


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