Day 210: Isaiah 43-44; Our Only Savior

One of the big themes in this second section of the book of Isaiah is that of restoration.  This can be seen today in many different ways.  The one I want to focus on in particular is that of the transformation of the wilderness that is written about in Isaiah 43.  This is actually something that has come up a couple times already in chapters 40-42, but takes on a very new and specific meaning today because of the context in which it is found.  Isaiah, or the writer at this point, writes the Words of the Lord as He is talking about Israel‘s salvation and relates it to what we could call Israel’s “first salvation,” their escape from the hand of Egypt by the power of God.

The Hebrew people hearing this would have picked up on this theme immediately.  This is such an integral part of the history of Israel, who could forget?  Isaiah is speaking of something like a second Exodus, a time when the people would leave Babylon and return to the land that God had given them.  They are reminded that it was God that made this happen before and it is God that will make it happen once again.  Yet there is something different this time.

Remember, after Israel’s escape from Egypt and the crossing of the Red Sea, they had to go into the wilderness.  We’ve talked about the wilderness experience at many different times throughout our journey through the Scriptures, from Israel to David and many other characters as well.  Every time though, as we pick up on this wilderness motif, we see it as a time of trial when the people or the person is faced with a great struggle that strips their identity and causes them to be re-identified.  For Israel, they went from being a group of slaves to a nation, a people of God.  David went from being a shepherd boy on the run to a wise and cunning king, ready to rule a nation.  But again, I point out that this time, the wilderness is different.

Isaiah isn’t talking about a vast expanse of land that is hostile to live in and difficult to survive through, He paints a picture of a redeemed and restored wilderness, a place in which the provisions of God are extravagant and overflowing:

Remember not the former things,
    nor consider the things of old.
Behold, I am doing a new thing;
    now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?
I will make a way in the wilderness
    and rivers in the desert.
The wild beasts will honor me,
    the jackals and the ostriches,
for I give water in the wilderness,
    rivers in the desert,
to give drink to my chosen people,
the people whom I formed for myself
that they might declare my praise.

So where does this come from?  This is the work of the Lord and Isaiah ties it into the salvation of Israel and the servant of the Lord that is to come.  Even though the people of Israel do not and will not recognize the work of the Lord, He still does the work to “blot our their transgressions.”  The point is being made here that the people cannot and will not be able to do these things on their own.  Despite any wilderness experience that they have, they will still fall away.  Even when faced with the mighty works of the Lord, the people still turn away from God.

But God does not leave them in their sin, He will bring them out of it and this time, the wilderness not be harsh and trying, but the way will be clear and the water overflowing.  The providence of the Lord will be more than anyone could ever possibly imagine.  Isaiah is referring to Jesus here, the way in the wilderness, the living water that never runs dry.  The grace that is given us in Jesus Christ is more than we could possibly imagine, covering over all the sins of the world.  This is the blessing to the world that Israel was always meant to be, the path laid before all people leading to the grace and mercy of God found in Jesus Christ.  Israel may have failed, but God never did.  They may not have been what they were intended to be, but God’s work towards salvation and restoration never ceased.  The way has been made for us in the wilderness, and the living water flows abundantly through it: Jesus Christ, the Way, the Truth, and the Life.


4 Responses to “Day 210: Isaiah 43-44; Our Only Savior”

  1. […] I am doing a new thing…” God speaks to His people through the prophet Isaiah.  That phrase reverberates throughout the end of the book of Revelation seeing it’s true […]

  2. […] Isaiah 44:24 – “This is what the Lord says—your Redeemer, who formed you in the womb: I am the Lord, the Maker of all things, who stretches out the heavens, who spreads out the earth by myself, […]

  3. […] Isaiah 43:11 – I, even I, am the Lord, and apart from me there is no savior. […]

  4. […] Isaiah 44:1-3 – “But now listen, Jacob, my servant, Israel, whom I have chosen.  This is what the Lord says— he who made you, who formed you in the womb, and who will help you: Do not be afraid, Jacob, my servant, Jeshurun, whom I have chosen.  For I will pour water on the thirsty land, and streams on the dry ground; I will pour out my Spirit on your offspring, and my blessing on your descendants. […]

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