Day 169: Psalms 79-84; Deeply Longing

I really love Psalm 84.  It talks very deeply of the longing of the psalmist to be in the presence of the Lord.  This isn’t just about spending a minute or two in prayer, but a deep longing to dwell in God’s presence.  The Psalmist seems to understand what it means to be in God’s presence, to know the peace of God and to bask in His glory.  He even goes on to say that he would rather be a doorkeeper in God’s house, a lowly servant working by opening and closing the door, than to dwell in places elsewhere.  The words of the Psalm are just beautiful.  I think today, in lue of anything else to say, I’ll just let the Psalm speak for itself.

Psalm 84

How lovely is your dwelling place,
    O Lord of hosts!
My soul longs, yes, faints
    for the courts of the Lord;
my heart and flesh sing for joy
    to the living God.

Even the sparrow finds a home,
    and the swallow a nest for herself,
    where she may lay her young,
at your altars, O Lord of hosts,
    my King and my God.
Blessed are those who dwell in your house,
    ever singing your praise! Selah

Blessed are those whose strength is in you,
    in whose heart are the highways to Zion.
As they go through the Valley of Baca
    they make it a place of springs;
    the early rain also covers it with pools.
They go from strength to strength;
    each one appears before God in Zion.

O Lord God of hosts, hear my prayer;
    give ear, O God of Jacob! Selah
Behold our shield, O God;
    look on the face of your anointed!

For a day in your courts is better
    than a thousand elsewhere.
I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God
    than dwell in the tents of wickedness.
For the Lord God is a sun and shield;
    the Lord bestows favor and honor.
No good thing does he withhold
    from those who walk uprightly.
O Lord of hosts,
    blessed is the one who trusts in you!

PSALM 79 is a psalm of lament written by Asaph.  This psalm is also an imprecatory psalm as we can see the psalmist petitioning the Lord for His justice.  Like most lament psalms, this psalm ends on a note of hope and trust.

PSALM 80 is also a psalm of lament written by Asaph.  In this psalm we see the psalmist crying out for restoration.  While there is no specific hopeful tone that we see at the end, the whole psalm is a testament to the trust that the writer has in God to restore them.

PSALM 81 is a psalm of praise and thanksgiving written by Asaph.  This is an interesting praise song in that it talks about the poor decisions of God’s people.  However, it does proclaim God’s mighty works and tell the story of God’s providence making it a didactic psalm as well.

PSALM 82 is a prayer of lament written by Asaph as well.  Asaph’s writing here is also didactic in nature and makes the turn towards trust in the very last line of the psalm, proclaiming God’s rule over the world.

PSALM 83 also a prayer of lament that is written by Asaph.  This psalm, however, is much more imprecatory and seems to be aimed directly at the psalmist’s enemies.  The turn towards hope and trust in this lament can be seen in the writer’s trust in God’s work and justice.

PSALM 84 is a psalm of praise that is written by the Korahites.  This is a Psalm of ascent which lends its self to being naturally didactic in nature as well.  This would have been a psalm that people would have sang as they made their way up to Jerusalem and up to the temple as well… like a good song on the way to church!


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