John 21 – Feed My Sheep

Read John 21

John records Peter’s denial of Jesus in chapter 18.  Unlike the other Gospels, though, Peter is not left in the miserable state that we leave him.  In fact, the interaction between Jesus and Peter after Jesus’ resurrection shows us the very nature of the restoration that takes place in our hearts and lives when we turn to (or back to) Christ.

It’s hard to imagine being in Peter’s place, knowing what he did and knowing that Jesus knew what he did.  I’m sure Peter felt a bit awkward here, unsure of what to say.  But Jesus doesn’t hesitate as all; they enjoy a meal together and Jesus wastes no time restoring He and Peter’s relationship.

The significance of the number of times Jesus asks Peter if he loves Him cannot be understated.  While it may seem like an obvious thing, Peter’s triple denial coupled with His triple affirmation, the repetition is important as we have talked about.  Jesus, knowing of Peter’s guilt, not only reinstates Peter, restoring their relationship but shows him that He is still able, and in fact called to the ministry that Jesus Himself was about.  No greater image of trust can be seen than here, an image of the Master charging the one who denied Him with testifying to His Name once again.

Jesus also has a difficult word for Peter, a prophecy of the trials that Peter would face.  I wonder if Peter felt a bit overwhelmed as if his future was unfair, and so he asks about John, Jesus’ beloved disciple.  The response he receives is an important lesson for us: what others deal with in life, the paths they have to walk and why is not our business; what is important is that we remain faithful to God’s calling for our lives.



Day 187: Proverbs 17-19; The Wisdom in Repetition

As I was reading through today’s Proverbs I actually caught myself thinking that this reading was getting a bit monotonous.  I’m pretty sure that some of the things that we read today were things that we read yesterday, or multiple other days.  In fact, there are a great many of the proverbs in the three chapters that we read today that are somewhat repeated from yesterday and days past.  I started to think to myself “why would Solomon repeat things multiple times?”  I definitely had to catch myself here because I think that I was starting to get a bad attitude around them.  Suddenly though, I wast struck but the wisdom in repeating these wise sayings… it isn’t about the vast amount of different wise sayings as much as it is about the wisdom found in the sayings that are there.

The Dead Sea Scrolls Photo Credit: www.faclan.org

The Dead Sea Scrolls
Photo Credit: www.faclan.org

I also realized that there are many examples of repetition in the Bible as well.  There are also many reasons for the repetition we find in Scripture!  Part of it, probably the main reason actually, comes from the Hebrew culture and their writing.  Hebrew writing has no punctuation.  If you read it in the original writing, or look at the dead sea scrolls, there really is very little break in the lines of writing at all.  This means that there are no symbols for adding emphasis like the exclamation point… and certainly no little smiley/frown faces to communicate emotions.  What this means for us, is that when things are repeated, especially when they are repeated in succession, there is a great deal of emphasis that is meant to be heard in it.  Think in Isaiah 6 or Revelation 4 when the Angels are singing “Holy Holy Holy” about the Lord.  This isn’t because they are stuttering or something, neither is it because of some sort of a lack of creativity on the part of the writer.  It is the repetition of the words that makes them powerful in the Hebrew language!  If you were to put it in today’s texting language, God is HOLY! =)

We’ve actually encountered the this type of repetition in Scripture many times in the past.  Think all the way back to Genesis, with the 2 creation narratives that we read.  One was most specific towards the details while the other was more focused on the human aspect, yet both were very geared towards the point that it was indeed God that created all things.  If you think ahead towards Abraham and the many times that the covenant was reaffirmed, we see the emphasis on the covenantal relationship that defines Israel, all which begins with God as well.  We see this with Jacob, Joseph, Moses and the giving of the Law, Joshua, and many many more throughout the history of Israel.  I have written more about this in another blog that I occasionally write in  as well.  It is an article called ‘Pete and Repeat.’  Feel free to check it out!

So today, and in the coming days, as you are reading these proverbs and one sounds familiar, take a moment to think about where you heard it before.  Maybe go back and look for it in the previous days’ readings.  Solomon is repeating these for a reason, not simply because he can’t think of anything else to say.  Perhaps these repeated sections will touch you in a special way today… perhaps they are things that we all need to hear again and again that we may better live our lives bringing honor and glory to God.