The Second Commandment: H.C. Question 96

What is God’s will for us in the second commandment? 

Deuteronomy 4:15-19 – You saw no form of any kind the day the Lord spoke to you at Horeb out of the fire. Therefore watch yourselves very carefully, so that you do not become corrupt and make for yourselves an idol, an image of any shape, whether formed like a man or a woman, or like any animal on earth or any bird that flies in the air, or like any creature that moves along the ground or any fish in the waters below. And when you look up to the sky and see the sun, the moon and the stars—all the heavenly array—do not be enticed into bowing down to them and worshiping things the Lord your God has apportioned to all the nations under heaven.

Isaiah 40:18-25 – With whom, then, will you compare God?  To what image will you liken him?  As for an idol, a metalworker casts it, and a goldsmith overlays it with gold and fashions silver chains for it.  A person too poor to present such an offering selects wood that will not rot; they look for a skilled worker to set up an idol that will not topple.

Do you not know?  Have you not heard?  Has it not been told you from the beginning?  Have you not understood since the earth was founded?  He sits enthroned above the circle of the earth, and its people are like grasshoppers.  He stretches out the heavens like a canopy, and spreads them out like a tent to live in.  He brings princes to naught and reduces the rulers of this world to nothing.  No sooner are they planted, no sooner are they sown, no sooner do they take root in the ground, than he blows on them and they wither, and a whirlwind sweeps them away like chaff.  “To whom will you compare me?  Or who is my equal?” says the Holy One.

Acts 17:29 – “Therefore since we are God’s offspring, we should not think that the divine being is like gold or silver or stone—an image made by human design and skill.

Romans 1:22-23 – Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and reptiles.

Leviticus 10:1-7  Aaron’s sons Nadab and Abihu took their censers, put fire in them and added incense; and they offered unauthorized fire before the Lord, contrary to his command. So fire came out from the presence of the Lord and consumed them, and they died before the Lord. Moses then said to Aaron, “This is what the Lord spoke of when he said:

“‘Among those who approach me I will be proved holy; in the sight of all the people I will be honored.’”  Aaron remained silent.

Moses summoned Mishael and Elzaphan, sons of Aaron’s uncle Uzziel, and said to them, “Come here; carry your cousins outside the camp, away from the front of the sanctuary.” So they came and carried them, still in their tunics, outside the camp, as Moses ordered.

Then Moses said to Aaron and his sons Eleazar and Ithamar, “Do not let your hair become unkempt and do not tear your clothes, or you will die and the Lord will be angry with the whole community. But your relatives, all the Israelites, may mourn for those the Lord has destroyed by fire. Do not leave the entrance to the tent of meeting or you will die, because the Lord’s anointing oil is on you.” So they did as Moses said.

1 Samuel 15:22-23 – But Samuel replied:  “Does the Lord delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices as much as in obeying the Lord?  To obey is better than sacrifice, and to heed is better than the fat of rams.  For rebellion is like the sin of divination, and arrogance like the evil of idolatry.  Because you have rejected the word of the Lord, he has rejected you as king.”



Day 41: Numbers 7-8; Offerings and Cleansing

Here, the head of each of the tribes of Israel bring their offerings before the Lord.  As you have read, each offering was the same.  I’m not entirely sure if there is some sort of significance to that, but I would venture to point out that each willingly brought it.  The fact that it was all twelve tribes that brought it leads me to believe that one of the points here is that the offerings were representative of the whole of the people of Israel.  The number 12 is a number that represents all of God’s people.  12 tribes, 12 apostles… and later we’ll read in revelation the 24 elders around the throne worshiping God, which is representative of all of Israel and the whole Church.

Once again here we see a cleansing ceremony.  The Levites have been set apart, as we read yesterday and today, for service to God.  They are chosen by God in place of all of the first born that were to be consecrated to God.  For them to serve appropriately, they needed to be cleansed and purified in the eyes of the Lord.  This is not unlike what we often do in our worship services.  We understand that we are a forgiven people, yet we still sin and those things can (and often do) hinder us from worshiping and serving the Lord with all our hearts.  So we set apart a time of confession and assurance of our pardon, often at the beginning of the worship service, so that we are lay those things down knowing that God has already cleansed us.  We are reminded that we are not a people under condemnation for our sins, but rather we live as a redeemed people!

Sometimes I think that Christians can get a bad wrap.  We are seen as quick to judge and quick to condemn.  Many people also think that we just remind ourselves how bad we are, always sinful… never good.  I think that this couldn’t be further from the truth!  We don’t live in our sin, in our past… or at least we shouldn’t.  Like the Levites and the priests here, we have been cleansed in the blood of Jesus.  He remembers our sins no more!!  In our time of confession, we are not there to condemn ourselves or put others down, but rather to remember the redemption we have in Christ Jesus and the gift of grace that has been freely given to us!  Hallelujah!



Day 29: Leviticus 1-4; Laws for Offerings (Part 1)

We’ve made it four week today!  To me it doesn’t really seem like that long ago that we started.  I don’t know about you, but it seems like just yesterday that 2013 started, and now its almost February.  One thing that this means though, is that we are entering into the Books of Leviticus and Numbers… some of the most difficult books to read if you ask me.  This is where I’ve always fallen away from the reading because it seems so dull and so completely out of touch with our lives today.  My hope is that through some discussion and reflection, we can discover more to these books than some outdated laws and sacrificial rites that we don’t follow anymore.  I will confess though, that I am a bit out of my league here as far as what I know about these things.  Throughout the next few weeks I will be drawing on a lot that I have learned from my Old Testament classes at Kuyper College and Western Theological Seminary.

As we get into these laws and regulations set down by God, I think that it is appropriate to start with a foundation of perspective in regards to what we are reading here.  While It is entirely true that God set these laws down as a way for the people of Israel to live, they are also meant to be a foreshadowing of things to come.  If you remember with me, ever since the incident in the Garden of Eden when humanity rebelled and fell into sin, God has been working towards restoration.  The whole course of redemptive history is about God’s work towards restoration and ultimately reconciliation.  Redemptive history isn’t simply about God bringing Jesus for the sake of individual salvation, but about God working His will to restore His creation to the perfection it was created in and for.  We see examples of this throughout the Bible, some that we have just read in Exodus about what happens when animals do bad things and whatnot.  We’ll read more about this in Leviticus and Numbers as well.

Much of what we are about to read is about living in right relationship with neighbors, with creation, and with God.  The Law was one way that God could set down a code of conduct for the people of Israel in which He could instruct them to live differently, as a testament to God.  The people of the earth would see them and through them see the Glory and Love of God.  This is perhaps one reason why the rules seem so strict and precise.

The alter of burnt offering

The Hebrew Sacrificial rite was one of the ways in which people were to show their desire to live in right relationship with God.  A way of atoning for sin had to be established for God’s people.  Again we see the symbol of blood, as we saw in The Passover which we read about in Exodus 12, and in the consecration of the Priests which we read about just a couple of days ago.  That symbol of blood, death for life, is a foreshadowing of the ultimate sacrifice that would come in the form of Jesus Christ.  See… the killing of animals was never meant to save… but as a way of showing faithfulness, and of creating an understanding of the nature of Jesus’ sacrifice.  When we look at these laws of Leviticus we are given the setting, the background, and the context for the that “once for all sacrifice” of Jesus Christ, the Messiah… the only true way of redemption, atonement, and reconciliation.