Higher Benefits: H.C. Question 49

How does Christ’s ascension to heaven benefit us?

Romans 8:34 – Who then is the one who condemns? No one. Christ Jesus who died—more than that, who was raised to life—is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us.

1 John 2:1 – My dear children, I write this to you so that you will not sin. But if anybody does sin, we have an advocate with the Father—Jesus Christ, the Righteous One.

John 14:2 – My Father’s house has many rooms; if that were not so, would I have told you that I am going there to prepare a place for you?

John 17:24 – “Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world.

Ephesians 2:4-6 – But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—it is by grace you have been saved. And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus,

John 14:16 – And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate to help you and be with you forever—

2 Corinthians 1:21-22 – Now it is God who makes both us and you stand firm in Christ. He anointed us, set his seal of ownership on us, and put his Spirit in our hearts as a deposit, guaranteeing what is to come.

2 Corinthians 5:5 – Now the one who has fashioned us for this very purpose is God, who has given us the Spirit as a deposit, guaranteeing what is to come.

Colossians 3:1-4 – Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things. For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.



Day 175: Psalms 109-115; Great Are the Lord's Works!

I’ll admit that as I’m writing this, the news is on in the background, and I’m hearing about all sorts of things that are going on in Grand Rapids, in West Michigan, in America, and around the world.  The thing about the news that is too often true, is that it is the bad things that make the most news.  Just as I’m listening this evening, the headlines are about a person that got hit by a car, the coming trial of George Zimmerman, the continuing scandals in the U.S. government, and more on the situation in Syria.  I guess I just don’t understand why this is the news that we want to hear.  If one was to simply watch the news all day, or even once a day, I can’t imagine how cynical and depressed they would be, if that was the picture of the world that was given.

But as I contrast this primarily negative view of the world with what we read today in the Psalms, we really get different and sometimes opposing views of the world.  The news media would have us believe that things are going crazy in the world, the everything is out of control and that no one is safe ever.  Obviously, they are decidedly secular in their views; hence the endless stream of bad news.  Yet the Psalms that we read today and have been reading for the past several days communicate to us a wholly different worldview, one in which God is in control and is working towards the restoration of the world.

It can be very depressing to listen to the news, to look out into the world, to see the brokenness that is around us.  Even Jesus knew this as He was talking to His disciples on the night before He was to be crucified.

I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.” – John 16:33

The next time you hear something from the news about all of the bad that is going on, remember that we believe that God has been working and will continue to work to bring restoration to the world.  And we can know this because of what we have seen Him do in the past… which is recounted for us in Psalm 111!

Praise the Lord!
I will give thanks to the Lord with my whole heart,
    in the company of the upright, in the congregation.
Great are the works of the Lord,
    studied by all who delight in them.
Full of splendor and majesty is his work,
    and his righteousness endures forever.
He has caused his wondrous works to be remembered;
    the Lord is gracious and merciful.
He provides food for those who fear him;
    he remembers his covenant forever.
He has shown his people the power of his works,
    in giving them the inheritance of the nations.
The works of his hands are faithful and just;
    all his precepts are trustworthy;
they are established forever and ever,
    to be performed with faithfulness and uprightness.
He sent redemption to his people;
    he has commanded his covenant forever.
    Holy and awesome is his name!
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom;
    all those who practice it have a good understanding.
    His praise endures forever!

PSALM 109 is a prayer of lament written by David.  This psalm has many imprecatory qualities, as David talks about evil men and his enemies, but there is a clear turn towards hope, praise, and thanksgiving about halfway through the psalm.

PSALM 110 is a royal psalm written by David that is both prophetic and Messianic in nature.  This Psalm is quoted in Hebrews 5-7 as the writer portrays Jesus as the “great high priest in the order of Melchizedek.”

PSALM 111 is a song of praise and thanksgiving that was written anonymously.  This psalm is also didactic in nature.

PSALM 112 is a wisdom psalm that was also written anonymously.  This psalm too is didactic and is also intercessional in nature.

PSALM 113 is a song of praise that was written anonymously.  This psalm is an Egyptian Hallel, a song sung during Passover season.

PSALM 114 is also a song of praise that was written anonymously.  This psalm is also an Egyptian Hallel, a song sung during Passover season.

PSALM 115 is a song of praise that also was written anonymously.  This psalm too is an Egyptian Hallel, a song sung during Passover season.



Day 165: Psalms 61-67; Trusting in God

Psalm 63:1 ...In a dry and weary land... Photo Credit: www.hisholyhill.blogspot.com

Psalm 63:1
…In a dry and weary land…
Photo Credit: www.hisholyhill.blogspot.com

To be honest, talking about a Psalm of trust like psalm 63 really would come best by just repeating what David writes.  So today, I’m going to say very little except to encourage you to read Psalm 63 again… and again.  Take time to picture the imagery that he uses, to feel the feelings he feels, and to let David’s words of trust in God work themselves into your hearts and minds.  Have you ever found yourself in a place in life where it seems like you are so lost, so incredibly in need of Him that you find yourself thirsting for more of God.  It is in this time that David writes psalm 63, and 62 as well, turning to God once again and giving us the model for faith and trust in our lives, just has he did yesterday for lament as well.  So again, read these words and let them sink into your hearts.  May they become the words of your heart when you find yourself in the wilderness as life.

Psalm 63

My Soul Thirsts for You

A Psalm of David, when he was in the wilderness of Judah.

O God, you are my God; earnestly I seek you;
my soul thirsts for you;
my flesh faints for you,
as in a dry and weary land where there is no water.
So I have looked upon you in the sanctuary,
beholding your power and glory.
Because your steadfast love is better than life,
my lips will praise you.
So I will bless you as long as I live;
in your name I will lift up my hands.

My soul will be satisfied as with fat and rich food,
and my mouth will praise you with joyful lips,
when I remember you upon my bed,
and meditate on you in the watches of the night;
for you have been my help,
and in the shadow of your wings I will sing for joy.
My soul clings to you;
your right hand upholds me.

But those who seek to destroy my life
shall go down into the depths of the earth;
they shall be given over to the power of the sword;
they shall be a portion for jackals.
But the king shall rejoice in God;
all who swear by him shall exult,
for the mouths of liars will be stopped.

PSALM 61 is a psalm of lament written by David.  Like all of David’s lamenting psalms, there is an element of hope and trust that can be clearly seen here.

PSALM 62 is a confession of trust that is written by David.  There is also an element of lament that can be noted in here it as well.

PSALM 63 is also a confession of trust with an element of lament that is written by David.  Psalm 63 was written while David was in the wilderness of Judah, which was likely during the time that he was being pursued by Saul which is recorded in the latter portion of 1 Samuel.

PSALM 64 is a psalm of lament written by David.  The part of this psalm that usually ends in hope and trust in other lament psalms actually includes a description of how God will act on David’s behalf.  It is an interesting twist to the norm but is said in a way that, even though it might not have physically happened, it is said as though it is so sure to happen that it is as if it is already in the past.

PSALM 65 is a song of praise and thanksgiving that clearly has a didactic quality to it as well.  This Psalm is written by David and clearly tells how David feels about God and describes the many works of God throughout history.

PSALM 66 is a song of praise and thanksgiving that is written anonymously.  Reading this psalm, we can see how beautifully the writer interweaves the call to offer praise and thanksgiving and also tells of the praise and thanksgiving that he/she is giving and has given God.  Even though the author talks about him/herself, the subject of this psalm is still very clearly about God.

PSALM 67  is a song of praise that can also serve as a prayer of intercession.  This psalm was also written anonymously.