Mark 16 – They were Afraid?

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Mark’s Gospel brings this story to a conclusion with a very unique and unexpected ending: “They said nothing to anyone because they were afraid.”  It seems so anti-climactic.    But we have to cut them some slack here.  They just experienced the most significant event in all of history that had an undeniable impact on the entire universe.  The truth for them, however, was that they had no idea what they were experiencing.  So honestly, they had every right to be afraid; you probably would have been too.

If we think about it for a moment, they obviously didn’t say “nothing to anyone” or else I wouldn’t be here writing this, nor you reading it.  Looking at the other Gospels, the accounts of Acts and Church history, obviously someone said something.  So why didn’t this just get edited out of later versions of Mark?  What possible purpose does this passage serve?

Perhaps Mark understands something that many of us experience from time to time: that an encounter with God, the experience of God working in our lives in unexpected and unexplainable ways can indeed be frightening.  Maybe Mark is creating space for people by showing that even some of Christ’s most faithful followers needed time to process what was happening to them in the midst of this powerful story.

We live in such a “now” oriented society, having everything at our fingertips with just the click of a button.  Explanations and definitions, videos and commentary are all only seconds away, yet far too often we don’t create space in our lives for the Holy Spirit to unravel and reveal the mysteries of God’s work on our hearts.  Sometimes we need space to process, to explore, and then eventually to tell of the great things God is doing in us!



Matthew 10 – Authority and Fear

Read Matthew 10

Have you ever been given authority to do something?  I remember the first time I was deemed the babysitter when my parents left; I was in charge of my brother.  The trust placed in me was exciting however it didn’t take long for the responsibility I had to sink in.  Soon after they left, I found myself terrified of all the “what-ifs.”  Anything that happened would be my responsibility to handle. Questions started flooding my mind about what I would do if…

Honestly, this isn’t unlike the experience of a first job, first-time homeowner, being newly married, or what I assume having a child will be like too.  I’ve experienced this first hand as a new pastor.  There are so many possibilities, both good and bad, and being in leadership makes me responsible on some level.

In Matthew 10, Jesus sends His disciples out, giving them authority to do all sorts of things.  After giving them a number of directives, they are told to go out and proclaim the Kingdom of Heaven while healing the sick, driving out demons, and even raising the dead.  To me, this sounds like a really tall order, a rather daunting task.

One of the truths about authority, though, is the reality that it has to be given.  Ultimate authority rests with God who empowers us to fulfill the calling He has given us.  Whether it is pastoring a church, raising children, being a banker, teaching a class, or plowing snow.  Multiple times in this passage the disciples are reminded, “do not be afraid.”  It is important for us to remember that, wherever we are and whatever we are doing, God has given us authority and empowered us to live for Him, being bearers of His Kingdom at all times and in all places.



Day 231: Jeremiah 38-41; Fear and the Fall

Today, we come to it yet again, the fall of Jerusalem.  We have talked about it a couple of times already at the end of 2 Kings and 2 Chronicles.  These two links will bring you back to these posts (over 100 days ago!).  Jeremiah‘s perspective on all that is happening is similar to what is recorded in 2 Kings and 2 Chronicles, but seen from a different point of view as he is still working desperately to save the city of Jerusalem and deliver the messages of the Lord of the Lord to King Zedekiah.

I don’t want to spend a lot of time talking about the fall of Jerusalem though.  It feels like we have covered this time and again through all of the prophesies and the accounts of its destruction.  There is another message for us today from the last conversation between Jeremiah and King Zedekiah.  The main theme of this?  Fear.

Jeremiah was punished for his unpopular message, imprisoned and thrown into a cistern because “he was going over to the Babylonians.”  I’m sure the public opinion poll of Jeremiah was pretty low at this point and the frustration level of all the Jews was super high.  This is a recipe for disaster for Jeremiah, one that winds up with him at the bottom of a cistern.  Clearly the people don’t want to hear what Jeremiah has to say… at least not until they are desperate, which is exactly what happens here.

The siege is almost over, the city has almost fallen, and King Zedekiah in a last ditch effort call for Jeremiah so he can hear from God one last time.  Jeremiah, knowing this game pretty well by now, doesn’t want to tell him anymore because he knows he’ll just get punished.  But after a promise, Jeremiah delivers one last message to him from the Lord, one that is, by prophetic standards, quite gracious.  I think that God recognizes that the King understands his folly and is seeking the Lord for repentance.  Yet even in that, Zedekiah is gripped with fear.  Jeremiah tells him to surrender… Zedekiah says he is afraid.  Ultimately, Zedekiah give into his fear and it costs him the entire royal court, his entire family, the whole city of Jerusalem, his eyesight, and his freedom.  All of this could have been avoided if Zedekiah had just listened to God.

Fear is a very powerful enemy, a gripping opponent, and a paralyzing emotion.  To often people in the world live (or rather don’t live) their lives because of fear.  I feel like there are times when I am even afraid to come before God because of the things that I have done.  I know my past and I know how God wants me to live and I see that these two things don’t match us.  In Zedekiah’s situation, the fear of what other people would think, say, and do if he followed God was what ultimately lead to his horrific capture and sentence.  Our culture pushes us to look and act a certain way so that people will like and appreciate us as well.  However, God calls us to live a certain way, a way in which He will indeed bless us, if we are faithful to Him.  Again, contrasting the Rechabites to Zedekiah, one will have a place serving God forever and the other will be completely cut off.  Sometimes faith and devotion to God may cost us a few worldly things, but those pale in comparison to the blessings we receive as faithful followers of God.