Day 184: Proverbs 8-10; The Foundation of Wisdom

Our reading today covers the end of the introduction section of Proverbs.  You may have noticed that there was very little in the way of actual proverbs in the first nine chapters of Proverbs.  Instead, we have seen Solomon lay out very clearly the necessity of wisdom, the foundation of wisdom, the need for wisdom, and how to attain wisdom in our own lives.  We have seen how he has set up the metaphor of wisdom and folly calling out to a young man, trying to ‘allure’ or ‘seduce’ him into bringing them into his life.  Solomon has shown how lady wisdom and lady folly sound so similar at times and how it can be difficult to discern between them.  Yet it is clear, or rather it becomes clear very quickly which one is actually life giving and which one is life stealing, life sucking, and ultimately life destroying.  Today, we read Solomon wrap up this metaphor in the introduction, going so far as to lay out the nature of the life of those who turn to wisdom and those who turn to folly.  Chapter nine lays this out clearly, showing those who have turned to wisdom as being like those who have gone to a feast.  Interestingly, those who turn to folly are also described as those who are going to a feast, yet instead of eating food that gives life, they are eating and drinking their own death.  Wisdom is life and life giving… Folly is the way to death and will always be life stealing… even if it doesn’t seem that way at the time.

God's Wisdom is displayed in creation Photo Credit: www.wisdom-ink.com

God’s Wisdom is displayed in creation
Photo Credit: www.wisdom-ink.com

The other very notable thing about today’s reading comes in chapter 8.  Solomon writes very extensively about the history and nature of wisdom.  I like how he talks about wisdom “dwelling with prudence,” and “finding knowledge and discretion.”  This demonstrates the relationship between these four virtues and how close they all come together.  He also clearly displays the antonyms of wisdom as well: pride, arrogance, and perverted speech.

God's Wisdom in Creation Photo Credit: www.datinggod.org

God’s Wisdom in Creation
Photo Credit: www.datinggod.org

What is more interesting, I think, is the presence of wisdom in the creation narrative.  If you remember back to Genesis 1 & 2, the words of Proverbs 8 will have a familiar cadence to them.  Yet Solomon’s point here is not to reiterate the creation narrative, but to make the connection between Creator God and Wisdom.  In some ways, the description of wisdom here as being so intricately involved in creation that it cannot be separated from the action of God as creator.  Some people have even identified this as some “proof” that the Holy Spirit, or better stated, all three persons of the Trinity were involved in creation.  Solomon is laying out the clear foundation of wisdom on which this world is built.  It is the clear that wisdom can be seen in every facet of creation’s design.  One can hear the canonical foreshadowing of Paul’s words in Romans 1:20, when he talks about all of creation being without excuse.  Both Paul and Solomon are laying out the argument that creation displays wisdom and, as we have said, wisdom and the Lord are intricately linked.  God’s glory and His wisdom are clearly displayed in all of creation, and if we are willing to look, we will be able to see it and give glory to God because of it.



Day 183: Proverbs 4-7; A Father's Wise Warnings

Did you ever have parents that told you or warned you about something and you thought that they didn’t know what they were talking about?  I dare say that we all have experienced this at one point in time.  Kids always think they know better than their parents… especially teenagers.  I remember being a senior in high school and thinking that my parents didn’t know anything and that I had it all together.  I couldn’t have been more wrong.  Of course there is an amount of growing up that all children have to do on their own.  We grow and learn through our experiences, shaped by the people around us and our interactions with them.  However, when it comes to those that have helped us to grow the most, there are none that compare to our parents.

Proverbs Wordle Photo Credit: www.fbcmb.wordpress.com

Proverbs Wordle
Photo Credit: www.fbcmb.wordpress.com

The words of today’s Scripture readings are works just like that, wise and loving words of instruction and warnings from a father to his son.  This is not your average after school lecture about getting good grades or doing the chores though, the words of the one speaking here are  those of a loving father trying to instruct and warn his son of what is to come in the world.  The purpose?  To gain wisdom and insight.  Why?  Because keeping wisdom before you is one of the best ways to say away from folly.

Again today we see the analogy that Solomon started to make yesterday between lady Wisdom and lady Folly.  Solomon is telling his son to get wisdom at all costs, and insight as well, and to cherish her above all else.  I don’t know about you but I can almost here the echos of wedding vows in these statements.  He says to “cherish her above all else, prize her, and not to forsake her.”  It is almost as if he is telling his son that once he has wisdom, he should never let her go for it is wisdom that will help make straight the paths of life and lead to a good life.  Not only that though, having wisdom and understanding is also the way to guard against going astray, falling into the trap of folly who is seductive and tricky.

Solomon once again shows folly as being like a prostitute, beautiful on the outside but crafty and false through and through.  Like the fast diets or get rich quick schemes of the world, things look really great at first glance, but when you really see into it, all your doing is just giving your money away to someone else.  Solomon warns too that folly will take you when you aren’t looking, which is why having wisdom, understanding, and insight is so important.  Temptations lurk around every corner, looking and sounding like something very nice, and turning out to be crooked and evil.

In all of this, we need to remember that ultimately Solomon is not encouraging wisdom for the sake of being wise, but wisdom that finds its root and beginning of God alone.  It is not at all a coincidence that Solomon is using adultery as a metaphor here.  Time and time again God has used this metaphor as a way to describe the children of Israel as their are enticed away from Him and towards other gods.  The Scripture that we read today would not have been simply thought of and received as Solomon talking to his son, but as God Himself, the Father of the nation of Israel, speaking and instructing His children and warning them against the allure of other gods.  Remember how God instructed His people to remove all the people from the land of Canaan lest they be lured away by their gods?  Our reading today is no different.  It is instruction to a son, a people, to us a couple thousand years later saying we indeed need to have wisdom that is rooted in the fear of the Lord… understanding and insight that we too may walk the straight and narrow path and not be led astray by the many tempting gods and adultresses of our time.



Day 182: Proverbs 1-3; Introduction to Proverbs

Welcome to July and welcome to the book of Proverbs.  This books is attributed mostly to King Solomon, the son of David.  Remember that Solomon was visited by God who offered to grant him anything that he asked for.  Solomon asked for wisdom and the Lord granted him wisdom in abundance so that Solomon was the wisest man that ever lived.  These Proverbs, as well as the books of Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon as attributed to Solomon.

The writings of proverbs are wisdom for living.  You’ve likely heard some of them in your life already; short sayings that seem like quick quips but are actually quite helpful. Some of the sayings that we’ll read are a bit more complex and may require some additional reflection to uncover their deeper meaning.  However, all are meant to help the reader in living a life of wisdom.

Some have said that the book of Proverbs is somewhat devoid of God.  These people would point out that most of what Solomon is saying here is not really about God but about correct moral living.  While in some ways that could be true, God doesn’t show up as much in this book as He did in most of the other books, the idea that God is not in this book couldn’t be further from the truth.  God indeed is here and is the basis for all that is written.  Solomon says it in Proverbs 1:7

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge

The Fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom... Photo Credit: www.words2wall.blogspot.com

The Fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom…
Photo Credit: www.words2wall.blogspot.com

The Hebrew word for ‘knowledge’ used there is actually a rather broad ranging term that encompasses the ideas of knowledge, perception, skill, discernment, understanding, and wisdom.  Solomon is saying that all of what is about to happen here finds its true origin in God alone.  This is not just moralistic teaching, and none of it can be divorced from God.  Knowing God, fearing the Lord (fear being the idea of reverence, awe, worship, wonder) is the basis for all that is to come in this book.  We must recognize that before we move on.

I think that another important thing to mention here is the use of the female pronouns in the book of proverbs when referring to wisdom.  While we have talked about using gender inclusive language when we read the Bible, this is a place where changing the ‘her’ to an ‘it’ would be an injustice to Solomon’s writing.  In these first chapters, Solomon is setting up a very specific contrast between the path of Wisdom and the path of Folly.  He does so by creating something like a scene from a drama: Lady Wisdom and Lady Folly are both trying to win the heart of a young man.  Lady Wisdom calls from the street corner.  She is out there in plain sight for all to see and listen to.  Lady folly though, is like the adulteress woman who sneaks around and creeps into the hearts of those unaware only to disappear as soon as she is done with you.  This is, perhaps, an over dramatized idea of the inward battle between Wisdom and Folly, but as we will see… it is not too far off base.

Wisdom words of James 3 Photo Credit: www.thedisciplestongue.com

Wisdom words of James 3
Photo Credit: www.thedisciplestongue.com

Ultimately the attraction of the way of Folly is that of riches and wealth in quick progression.  Folly offers everything now as long as you are willing to ignore the rules or social convention.  Interestingly though, wisdom offers greater riches over time but on a safe path of understanding, perception, and knowledge that is rooted in the Lord.  In this, Solomon says, we find the true way in which God will also be our protector.  Ultimately the wise person will be blessed in greater ways than that of the foolish, but it takes more work, more patience, and more trust in the Lord.  In chapter 3 Solomon even makes an allusion to the Shema from Deuteronomy 6, keeping things like love and faithfulness bound around the neck and written on the heart.

Ultimately the path of wisdom is going to lead to right living and a blessed life.  The difference, though, between that and the world’s teaching of ‘wisdom’ is that living morally is not an end in itself, it is only a byproduct of keeping our eyes on God.  We don’t live morally for personal gain, we do it because of our love for God and our desire to live for Him as a way of gratitude for all that He has given us.  All of this, all of us should be grounded in the fear of the Lord.  It is the beginning of everything, something we will continue to hold in front of us throughout this book.



Day 181: Psalms 145-150; The Great Doxology

A Doxology is a song of praise to God for His blessings.  Think of the familiar Doxology that you may have sung in Church before:

Praise God from whom all blessings flow
Praise Him all creatures here below
Praise Him above ye heavenly hosts
Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost!

Worship Photo Credit: www.worshipunashamed.org/

Worship
Photo Credit: www.worshipunashamed.org

Today’s psalms are just that, a doxology.  In one church that I worked in, after we gave our offerings and tithes we all stood and sung the doxology, thanking God for the blessings that He has given us and committing them to the Lord.  It was always a moving experience and did a great job keeping in focus the truth of our giving: We do not give what is ours, we give back to God what was already His and was only entrusted to us.

Today we encounter a Doxology, or what I have deemed “the Great Doxology” in Scripture here at the end of our journey through the psalms.  We’ve spent nearly 1 full month on this book of the Bible combing through its great variety of emotions, teachings, prayers, songs, laments, praises, and so much more.  As we come to the end though, we have the opportunity to look back and see how great the whole of the book of Psalms is and what it indeed has taught us and modeled for us.  And now we have the opportunity to say thank you and to lift up praises to God.

Today (well tomorrow night actually), also marks the half way point in the year!  We’ve come a long ways and have seen the amazing story of God’s work in creation, in the nation of Israel, and in the teachings of His Word.  We have so much to celebrate today!  It is fitting that these psalms also fall on a Sunday (at least they did in 2013), and we have to opportunity to gather with God’s people to worship Him.  The words of the Psalms today fit the worship bill to the letter:

I will extol you, my God and King, and bless your name forever and ever.
Every day I will bless you and praise your name forever and ever.
Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised, and his greatness is unsearchable.

Praise the Lord!
Praise the Lord, O my soul!
I will praise the Lord as long as I live; I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.

Praise the Lord!
For it is good to sing praises to our God; for it is pleasant, and a song of praise is fitting.

Praise the Lord!
Praise the Lord from the heavens;
praise him in the heights!
Praise him, all his angels;
praise him, all his hosts!

There are so many songs out there that draw their words from today’s 5 psalms.  One that comes to mind right now is “All Creatures of our God and King”  Take a moment to listen it.  We will close our section on the Psalms with the words of that song today.  I would encourage you to continue reading the psalms too.  I know its a lot of reading with all the other readings that we are doing and the reading of this blog as well.  But, remember as we started out the Psalms I talked about how N.T. Wright said that he reads 5 Psalms a day every day and just keeps repeating them?  He does this because he said that it has helped him learn how to pray, praise, lament, thank, trust, hope and worship the Lord through the words of Scripture.  This, he said, was an invaluable experience.  Maybe you can’t read 5 psalms a day… maybe you can only read 1 or 2… that’s ok!  I encourage you to continue doing that as often as you can!  Let the Word of God flow over you.  Let the Word of God read you… that you may find yourself and your story in it!

All creatures of our God and King
Lift up your voice and with us sing
O praise Him alleluia
Thou burning sun with golden beam
Thou silver moon with softer gleam
O praise Him O praise Him
Alleluia alleluia alleluia

Thou rushing wind that art so strong
Ye clouds that sail in Heav’n along
O praise Him alleluia
Thou rising moon in praise rejoice
Ye lights of evening find a voice
O praise Him O praise Him
Alleluia alleluia alleluia

Let all things their Creator bless
And worship Him in humbleness
O praise Him alleluia
Praise praise the Father praise the Son
And praise the Spirit three in One
O praise Him O praise Him
Alleluia alleluia alleluia



Day 180: Psalms 139-144; Search My Heart

Today’s reading is a return to the laments of King David.  Though only one of them (Psalm 142) has a specific situation attached to it, they all exhibit the crying out of a person in distress.  One of my favorite Psalms of today is Psalm 139.  This Psalm is considered to be a Psalm of lament, but I see it as more than just lamenting in that as David cries out to the Lord he is also confessing his trust and belief in a God that is vastly more powerful and wise than the situation that he finds himself in now.  I invite you to re-read the words of this Psalm:

Psalm 139

O Lord, you have searched me and known me!
You know when I sit down and when I rise up;
    you discern my thoughts from afar.
You search out my path and my lying down
    and are acquainted with all my ways.
Even before a word is on my tongue,
    behold, O Lord, you know it altogether.
You hem me in, behind and before,
    and lay your hand upon me.
Such knowledge is too wonderful for me;
    it is high; I cannot attain it.

Where shall I go from your Spirit?
    Or where shall I flee from your presence?
If I ascend to heaven, you are there!
    If I make my bed in Sheol, you are there!
If I take the wings of the morning
    and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea,
even there your hand shall lead me,
    and your right hand shall hold me.
If I say, “Surely the darkness shall cover me,
    and the light about me be night,”
even the darkness is not dark to you;
    the night is bright as the day,
    for darkness is as light with you.

For you formed my inward parts;
    you knitted me together in my mother’s womb.
I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made.
Wonderful are your works;
    my soul knows it very well.
My frame was not hidden from you,
when I was being made in secret,
    intricately woven in the depths of the earth.
Your eyes saw my unformed substance;
in your book were written, every one of them,
    the days that were formed for me,
    when as yet there was none of them.

How precious to me are your thoughts, O God!
    How vast is the sum of them!
If I would count them, they are more than the sand.
    I awake, and I am still with you.

Oh that you would slay the wicked, O God!
    O men of blood, depart from me!
They speak against you with malicious intent;
    your enemies take your name in vain.
Do I not hate those who hate you, O Lord?
    And do I not loathe those who rise up against you?
I hate them with complete hatred;
    I count them my enemies.

Search me, O God, and know my heart!
    Try me and know my thoughts!
And see if there be any grievous way in me,
    and lead me in the way everlasting!

Check out the song Search My Heart from Hillsongs, based on this psalm.

We often find ourselves in situations that we cannot handle and do not see any way out of.  Sometimes we sin for reasons that we don’t understand at all.  This leads us deeper into a pit of despair and self-doubt.  Take comfort in knowing that God is greater than any situation that you will encounter.  Take comfort in knowing that God knows you heart.  He formed and created you.  He knew you before you even existed.  And, as Paul writes in his first letter to the Corinthians, “God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

Indeed He has provided a way for us in Jesus Christ, the true way out of sin and temptation.  That isn’t to say that life will be perfect here and now, but we can live in the assurance that our sins have been bought and paid for in Christ’s blood.  We know that we are not enduring anything that Christ hasn’t, and that His Spirit is with us each and every day strengthening and guiding us along the way.  And He will indeed lead us in the way everlasting!



Day 179: Psalms 132-138; The Great Hallel

Psalm 136 - The Great Hallel Photo Credit: hilldaleworship.blogspot.com

Psalm 136 – The Great Hallel
Photo Credit: hilldaleworship.blogspot.com

Today’s reading wraps up the Songs of Ascent and goes on to other psalms including Psalm 136 which is known as “The Great Hallel.”  This is a Psalm that would have been recited before the Passover meal in Hebrew culture.  I believe in many places they still do this today.  While I know that some of the names of the kings don’t necessarily mean anything to us in our current context, this psalm nonetheless tells the magnificent story of God’s action and how His love indeed endures forever.  Most of today’s post will be this Psalm, but I would encourage you to once again read it… and find your place in it.  There are surly things that don’t necessarily fit your life, but perhaps instead of striking down Og, king of Bashan, perhaps the Lord has helps you in your struggle with depression… or instead of bringing Israel out from Egypt, God has lead you through and out of a battle with addiction…  Maybe this psalm simply reminds you that God’s love and faithfulness are with us each and every day, even in the mundane details and seemingly endless amount of chores, laundry, and child rearing that you do faithfully day in and day out.

There are many ways that we too can find ourselves within the context of God’s story… what miraculous, or maybe not so miraculous yet still faithful things has God done in your life today?

Psalm 136

Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good,
    for His steadfast love endures forever.
Give thanks to the God of gods,
    for His steadfast love endures forever.
Give thanks to the Lord of lords,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;

to Him who alone does great wonders,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
to Him who by understanding made the Heavens,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
to Him who spread out the earth above the waters,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;

to Him who made the great lights,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
the sun to rule over the day,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
the moon and stars to rule over the night,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;

to Him who struck down the firstborn of Egypt,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
and brought Israel out from among them,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
with a strong hand and an outstretched arm,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
to Him who divided the Red Sea in two,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
and made Israel pass through the midst of it,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
but overthrew Pharaoh and His host in the Red Sea,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
to Him who led His people through the wilderness,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;

to Him who struck down great kings,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
and killed mighty kings,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
Sihon, king of the Amorites,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
and Og, king of Bashan,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
and gave their land as a Heritage,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
a Heritage to Israel His servant,
    for His steadfast love endures forever.

It is He who remembered us in our low estate,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
and rescued us from our foes,
    for His steadfast love endures forever;
He who gives food to all flesh,
    for His steadfast love endures forever.

Give thanks to the God of Heaven,
    for His steadfast love endures forever.



Day 178: Psalms 120-131; The Songs of Ascent

Ascending to the Temple of God in Jerusalem Photo Credit: www.praisechoir.com

Ascending to the Temple of God in Jerusalem
Photo Credit: www.praisechoir.com

Today’s psalms are part of a collection of psalms known as the “Pilgrim Psalms,” or as the they say in their titles, “song of ascents.”  They are also sometimes called Gradual Psalms or Songs of Degrees.  Many scholars believe these psalms were sung by the worshipers as they ascended up the road to Jerusalem to attend the three pilgrim festivals which are recorded in Deuteronomy 16:16.   They may have also been sung by the kohanim (aka. the Korahites), who were the Temple priests, as they ascended the fifteen steps to minister at the Temple in Jerusalem.  Its also possible that these songs were sung by the captives as they returned from Babylon to Israel!

While information like that is nice to know, I think it pales in comparison to what we get from these psalms today.  These songs were indeed used for preparing the people and their leaders for worship.  If you think back to Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the whole purpose of worship was to come before God and be made new and clean once again.  This happened through sacrifice and, if it never happened at any other times in a year, it did happen on these three dates: The Passover (aka. The Feast of Unleavened Bread), The Feast of Weeks, and The Feast of Tabernacles.  Each of these feasts come with their own appropriate code of conduct, but all of them have one thing in common, a corporate re-orientation of the lives of those in the Israelite community; a remembrance of who they are and where they came from.  We can see this very clearly in the lines of these psalms:

“In my distress I called to the Lord, and He answered me…”

“I lift up my eyes to the hills.  From where does my help come?  My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth.”

“To You I lift up my eyes, O You who are enthroned in the heavens!”

“Those who trust in the Lord are like Mount Zion, which cannot be moved, but abides forever.”

“Unless the Lord builds the house, those who build it labor in vain.”

The Psalms of Ascent: A Call to Prayer Photo credit: www.cccooperagency.wordpress.com

The Psalms of Ascent:
A Call to Prayer
Photo credit: www.cccooperagency.wordpress.com

These psalms, as is true with many of the other psalms, make me think a lot about my own orientation and that of the Church as well.  Do we come into church on any given Sunday expecting to encounter God?  Do we take time to prepare ourselves for worship?  Do we recognize who God is and who we are?  Do we feel like we even need God’s help?  Is this really the first time we have thought about God since last Sunday?  These are difficult questions to ask not because the answers are difficult to find, but because the truth of the answers is difficult to swallow.

Today’s psalms are short and quick to read.  They run the gambit of praise, thanksgiving, lament, hope, trust, and just about any emotion you can think of.  The page(s) that they are on are good to keep bookmarked or dogeared in your Bible and the psalms contained therein are good reminders of the right orientation for our lives.  Like a compass always pointing north, these Psalms (and the whole Bible really) point us directly in the direction of God… a reminder that I’m sure we need on a daily basis.



Day 177: Psalm 119; The "Great" Psalm

Today we come to the longest chapter of the Bible, the greatest psalm of the psalms, and what could arguably be called the best acrostic of all time: Psalm 119.  This psalm is considered a wisdom psalm, mostly because the wisdom psalms are really all encompassing.  There are elements of teaching, praise, thanksgiving, lament, petition, and history in this psalm, all wound together in an acrostic poem.  Sadly, this psalm is written anonymously so there is on one that we can credit it too… which I think might be the point really in that the focus is truly and completely on God in all of this.

Psalm 119:34

Psalm 119:34

As I read through this psalm I kind of envision the psalmist sitting out under a tree on a nice warm summer day thinking about all the ways that he/she has been blessed.  The writer was jotting down a bunch of things and started putting them in an acrostic poem and before you know it, psalm 119 was born.  Of course I cannot independently verify this but the acrostic style kind of reminds me of a child’s thanksgiving day project or something.  When I was young I could always remember the thanksgiving day children’s sermon; it was always the same.  We wrote the word ‘thanksgiving’ on a whiteboard and then we wrote down things that we were thankful for.  Other times I remember writing an acrostic poem that used all the letters of my name or something.  It is something that I remember doing occasionally as a child.

I wonder though how often I would do… or actually do in my early adult life though.  Do I take the time to thank God for all the things that He has given me?  Am I conscious of the many blessings that God has given me and do I praise Him for them?  Have I actually taken the time to do that in my life lately?  Sadly… I have to answer ‘no.’  I could blame time, busyness, work, school, or a myriad of other things as the reasons why I don’t spend time thinking and thanking about how abundantly blessed I am, but the fact of the matter is that it doesn’t happen on a regular basis if at all.

While my words here really wouldn’t do anything to improve this already great psalm, I think the challenge that has been uncovered is clear: We need to take time to be thankful and give God honor and praise for all the blessings that He has given us.  I challenge you, whoever and wherever you are to take time to do this and, in honor of Psalm 119, do it in an acrostic form.  Whether you use the letters of your name or the alphabet, take the time to name the blessings in your life and thank God for them.



Day 176: Psalms 116-118; The Egyptian Hallel

The three psalms that we are reading today are part of a 6 psalm unit known as “The Egyptian Hallel.”  A Hallel is considered to be a portion of a Jewish worship service that take place during their times of festivals.  It consists of psalms 113-118, which are spoken, prayed, or chanted aloud as a unit as part of the morning prayer service.  Typically, this would happen especially around the time of the Passover, when the people of God remember their time in bondage and the freedom that has been given to them by the power of God.  And this is really what these do, give honor and glory to God for His amazing work!

You really can’t just read the psalms from today without including psalms 113-115 as well.  They really are a unit, a single entity; they could be one long psalm.  In many ways, these psalms tell the story of God’s faithfulness, providence, and power when He remembered Israel and brought them out of the land of Egypt and freed them from the oppression that they had suffered for so many years.  I would encourage you to read through all 6 of these psalms together and take time to reflect on and remember the story of God’s amazing work in Exodus.

We know too that this story is not just something that happened in the past, but it is indeed the story of our lives as well.  You and I and every human on this earth have been born into the bondage of sin.  Yet God didn’t leave us there either just as He didn’t leave the Israelites in Egypt.  God sent His Son Jesus as a direct assault on sin, our abusive master, and freed us from it through His death on the cross.  We had been slaves… now we are free by the blood of Jesus!  This Egyptian Hallel is our song of praise as well!  Take time to read them… to reflect on them… and to find yourself in them.  Maybe they will give you the words to say to express your thanks and praise to God as well!

PSALM 116-118 are psalms of thanksgiving and praise to God for His work in the lives of His people.  These psalms were written anonymously, are clearly didactic in nature, and are actually part of a unit of psalms from 113-118.  Psalm 117 is the shortest chapter in the Bible and the shortest psalm.  Psalm 118 is also a messianic psalm with prophetic overtones.



Day 175: Psalms 109-115; Great Are the Lord's Works!

I’ll admit that as I’m writing this, the news is on in the background, and I’m hearing about all sorts of things that are going on in Grand Rapids, in West Michigan, in America, and around the world.  The thing about the news that is too often true, is that it is the bad things that make the most news.  Just as I’m listening this evening, the headlines are about a person that got hit by a car, the coming trial of George Zimmerman, the continuing scandals in the U.S. government, and more on the situation in Syria.  I guess I just don’t understand why this is the news that we want to hear.  If one was to simply watch the news all day, or even once a day, I can’t imagine how cynical and depressed they would be, if that was the picture of the world that was given.

But as I contrast this primarily negative view of the world with what we read today in the Psalms, we really get different and sometimes opposing views of the world.  The news media would have us believe that things are going crazy in the world, the everything is out of control and that no one is safe ever.  Obviously, they are decidedly secular in their views; hence the endless stream of bad news.  Yet the Psalms that we read today and have been reading for the past several days communicate to us a wholly different worldview, one in which God is in control and is working towards the restoration of the world.

It can be very depressing to listen to the news, to look out into the world, to see the brokenness that is around us.  Even Jesus knew this as He was talking to His disciples on the night before He was to be crucified.

I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.” – John 16:33

The next time you hear something from the news about all of the bad that is going on, remember that we believe that God has been working and will continue to work to bring restoration to the world.  And we can know this because of what we have seen Him do in the past… which is recounted for us in Psalm 111!

Praise the Lord!
I will give thanks to the Lord with my whole heart,
    in the company of the upright, in the congregation.
Great are the works of the Lord,
    studied by all who delight in them.
Full of splendor and majesty is his work,
    and his righteousness endures forever.
He has caused his wondrous works to be remembered;
    the Lord is gracious and merciful.
He provides food for those who fear him;
    he remembers his covenant forever.
He has shown his people the power of his works,
    in giving them the inheritance of the nations.
The works of his hands are faithful and just;
    all his precepts are trustworthy;
they are established forever and ever,
    to be performed with faithfulness and uprightness.
He sent redemption to his people;
    he has commanded his covenant forever.
    Holy and awesome is his name!
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom;
    all those who practice it have a good understanding.
    His praise endures forever!

PSALM 109 is a prayer of lament written by David.  This psalm has many imprecatory qualities, as David talks about evil men and his enemies, but there is a clear turn towards hope, praise, and thanksgiving about halfway through the psalm.

PSALM 110 is a royal psalm written by David that is both prophetic and Messianic in nature.  This Psalm is quoted in Hebrews 5-7 as the writer portrays Jesus as the “great high priest in the order of Melchizedek.”

PSALM 111 is a song of praise and thanksgiving that was written anonymously.  This psalm is also didactic in nature.

PSALM 112 is a wisdom psalm that was also written anonymously.  This psalm too is didactic and is also intercessional in nature.

PSALM 113 is a song of praise that was written anonymously.  This psalm is an Egyptian Hallel, a song sung during Passover season.

PSALM 114 is also a song of praise that was written anonymously.  This psalm is also an Egyptian Hallel, a song sung during Passover season.

PSALM 115 is a song of praise that also was written anonymously.  This psalm too is an Egyptian Hallel, a song sung during Passover season.



Day 174: Psalms 106-108; Give Thanks to the Lord, for He is good…

As we move into book 5 of the Psalms, we really get into some of the well known praise psalms.  These psalms have inspired a great many songs throughout even more generations since they were first written!  While we often put the greatest emphasis on the reading of the Word of God, and I wouldn’t deny the importance of this, it seems also important for us to sing the Word of God.  Songs and music touch us in ways that are much different and often times much deeper than a lecture or sermon.  Music, melody, and lyrics stick with us and its so great to have the Word of God in our heads each and every day!  If this happens in the form of song, then fantastic!  These songs, from a variety of different backgrounds and generations, are all inspired by different parts of Psalm 106-108… I hope that they can speak to you today!

PSALM 106-108 are psalms of praise and thanksgiving for God’s great works, steadfast love, and abounding grace.  Each is very didactic in nature as they describe the many reasons for offering praise and thanksgiving to God  Psalm 106 and 107 are written anonymously while psalm 108 is attributed to King David and is considered by some to be a psalm of ascent.



Day 173: Psalms 103-105; How Great is Our God

Oh give thanks to the Lord; call upon his name; make known his deeds among the peoples!

These are fitting words for the psalms that we read through today!  All three are psalms of praise that tell of the many acts and words of the Lord and all three proclaim His glory and splendor!  I don’t honestly think that there is a lot to be added to these Psalms… I think that they are best re-read over and over.  I would encourage you to do that today!  Take time to read these Psalms at least two more times.  As you do this, take time to think back over the past 6 months… over all that we have read and encountered in the Scriptures.  Do you remember the times that the psalmist is talking about?  Take some more time to think about the things in your life… how have you seen God at work in your day to day walk?

PSALM 103-105 are psalms of praise and thanksgiving that are written anonymously.  Each is didactic in nature, with psalm 105 actually being more of a historical account of God’s amazing works in redemptive history.  Though all three reference times past, they can also draw our attention to God’s work in the present and in our own lives as well.



Day 172: Psalms 96-102; The Lord is King

There are a lot of bad things that are going on in the world today.  We hear about something new everyday it seems.  Whether it is our government that is doing something that the people do not seem to like, or another government oppressing its people, it appears as though many of the leaders of the world seem to have fallen victim to corruption.  Then there are the wars and uprisings that are happening all over the place; religious groups killing each other in the name of God or Allah or some other deity that they worship saying that it is “part of their religion,” even though it clearly isn’t.  Add to this the seemingly endless stream of natural disasters that kill thousands  of people every year and all the talk of how we are polluting the planet and causing this that and the other thing.

Natural Disasters Photo Credit: www.harunyahya.com ***Please Note: I do not endorse this website, but simply give credit for the picture***

Natural Disasters
Photo Credit: www.harunyahya.com
***Please Note: I do not endorse this website, but simply give credit for the picture***

The news is full of horrific stories of violence and people using the bad things to push their political agendas.  Poverty, hunger, oppression, and a myriad of other things are still major social issues with people that are stuck in a system that seems to be designed to keep them stuck right where they are.  All this and more is more than enough to dishearten any of us into thinking that the whole world is ‘going to hell in a hand basket‘ and God doesn’t seem to give two hoots about it.  Yet the Psalms that we encounter today very clearly challenge that disheartened assumption:

Oh sing to the Lord a new song, sing to the Lord all the earth…
The Lord reigns, let the peoples rejoice…
Oh sing to the Lord a new song, for he has done marvelous things…
The Lord reigns; let the peoples tremble!

These are the first lines of Psalms 96-99, all psalms of the Lord’s Kingship.  These are known as the enthronement psalms and speak very clearly of God’s sovereign rule and affirms His position as a powerful Creator and sovereign Lord.  It may seem as though everything is circling the drain, but Scripture is very clear that God is in control.  Sometimes I think that this is a cop-out answer to any problem that people are facing, or rather clearly not facing in their own lives; a way of saying “I don’t have to deal with this because God will take care of it.”  While I don’t necessarily agree that hiding behind the fact that God is truly on the throne always and is truly reigning over us is an excuse for inaction, I do believe that it offers us a level of comfort in understanding that there is a higher power at work in the world, often in ways that we cannot necessarily see or understand.

God upholds the world in His hands!

God upholds the world in His hands!

We have talked about this before; it is a conversation that goes all the way back to Adam and Noah.  God created the world and He is intimately involved in all that goes on in it.  God’s covenant with Noah tells us that God is always and forever sustaining the world and upholding it and all that is in it.  We have not been left to fend for ourselves!  Indeed there is nothing that goes on in the world that doesn’t happen because God allows it to happen… even the bad stuff.  While we are certainly allowed free will to decide, and God sustains our lives even in our sinful actions, He doesn’t applaud them or their results.  However, if God didn’t sustain us we would simply cease to exist.

But we believe that God is more than just involved in sustaining the world and making sure things continue to run, we believe that God is working out His will for creation! He is working to bring it back from its fallen state, to bring it back to the perfection that it was created for.  God is working towards restoration and no evil action or natural disaster can stop this!  We may not always see it and we certainly don’t always feel it, but God is always there working His will and some day we will see the end result of God’s work: the full and complete restoration of the world!!  Amen!  Maranatha!  Come Lord Jesus!

PSALM 96-99 are Enthronement Psalms that are written anonymously.  These psalms are also psalms of praise and thanksgiving that are Messianic in nature and have prophetic overtones to them as well.

PSALM 100 is a rather well know song of praise and thanksgiving that is written anonymously.  This psalm was very popular for my family around thanksgiving time.

PSALM 101 is a Royal Psalm that is written by King David that is also didactic in nature.

PSALM 102 is a penitential psalm of lament that is also written by King David.  There is a very clear thread of hope and trust that shows up in the middle of this psalm, even though it seems to end on a bit of a low note.



Day 171: Psalms 90-95; The Psalm of Moses

Today begins book 4 of the Psalms, of which most of the psalms are written anonymously.  The first psalm in this book, however, is the only psalm in the book of Psalms that is attributed to Moses.  It is considered to be the lament of Moses, likely made while the people of Israel were camped at Mount Sinai or while they were wondering in the wilderness.  As I read it, I certainly get the feeling that there is something that is not going right and Moses is crying out to God in a very humbling way.  This Psalm, for all intents and purposes, really puts God and creation right in their places.  Moses magnifies the greatness of God and attests to the weakness and frailty of humanity.  In it, he is teaching the reader/hearer of God’s might and power while comparing it to the meager position that creation holds before Him.  Interestingly, this is not the only song that Moses writes that is recorded in the Bible and his other major song, though a song of praise and thanksgiving, is not at all unlike Psalm 90 either.  I refer to the song that Moses sings after the people of Israel cross the Red Sea.  Let me encourage you to read this song as it is recorded in Exodus 15, and compare it to Psalm 90.  Do you see any similarities?  Differences?  What do you think this says about Moses?

Moses Parts the Red Sea Photo Credit: www.rapgenius.com

Moses Parts the Red Sea
Photo Credit: www.rapgenius.com

I will sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously;
    the horse and his rider he has thrown into the sea.
The Lord is my strength and my song,
    and he has become my salvation;
this is my God, and I will praise him,
    my father’s God, and I will exalt him.
The Lord is a man of war;
    the Lord is his name.

Pharaoh’s chariots and his host he cast into the sea,
    and his chosen officers were sunk in the Red Sea.
The floods covered them;
    they went down into the depths like a stone.
Your right hand, O Lord, glorious in power,
    your right hand, O Lord, shatters the enemy.
In the greatness of your majesty you overthrow your adversaries;
    you send out your fury; it consumes them like stubble.
At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up;
    the floods stood up in a heap;
    the deeps congealed in the heart of the sea.
The enemy said, ‘I will pursue, I will overtake,
    I will divide the spoil, my desire shall have its fill of them.
    I will draw my sword; my hand shall destroy them.’
You blew with your wind; the sea covered them;
    they sank like lead in the mighty waters.

Who is like you, O Lord, among the gods?
    Who is like you, majestic in holiness,
    awesome in glorious deeds, doing wonders?
You stretched out your right hand;
    the earth swallowed them.

You have led in your steadfast love the people whom you have redeemed;
    you have guided them by your strength to your holy abode.
The peoples have heard; they tremble;
    pangs have seized the inhabitants of Philistia.
Now are the chiefs of Edom dismayed;
    trembling seizes the leaders of Moab;
    all the inhabitants of Canaan have melted away.
Terror and dread fall upon them;
    because of the greatness of your arm, they are still as a stone,
till your people, O Lord, pass by,
    till the people pass by whom you have purchased.
You will bring them in and plant them on your own mountain,
    the place, O Lord, which you have made for your abode,
    the sanctuary, O Lord, which your hands have established.
The Lord will reign forever and ever.”

PSALM 90 is a psalm of lament that was written by Moses. As is clear with Moses’ style of writing when it comes to songs, this psalm is didactic in nature and teaches about the greatness of God over and above all of creation.

PSALM 91 is a confession of trust that was written anonymously. This psalm is also didactic and weaves in a a clear thread of thanksgiving for God’s faithfulness, strength and protection.  Interestingly, Psalm 91:11 is the Scripture that Satan quotes when he is testing Jesus in Matthew 4 and Luke 4.

PSALM 92 is a song of praise that was also written anonymously. This psalm too is clearly didactic in nature, singing of the great works of God and how good it is to praise Him for what He has done.  The title given this psalm is “A song for the Sabbath.”  I wonder how many of us truly feel this way on Sunday morning when we come to church… I know I struggle with it often…

PSALM 93 is also a song of praise, one that is also known as a song of the Lord’s Kingship, and was written anonymously. A Song of the Lord’s Kingship is also known as an enthronement psalm, written to describe God’s sovereign rule and affirm His position as a powerful Creator and sovereign Lord.  Along with this, psalm 93 is also a song of praise and has many messianic overtones. 

PSALM 94 is a prayer of lament that was also written anonymously. Like many of the lamenting psalms, this too is didactic in nature with some imprecatory qualities as well.  There is a clear turn towards hope and trust at the end as well, making this Psalm almost Davidic in nature, even though the writer is anonymous.

PSALM 95 is a song of praise that too was written anonymously.  It is short and sweet, but has inspired some contemporary worship songs!



Day 170: Psalms 85-89; The Name of the Lord

The Lord Passes before Moses Photo Credit: www.bibleinbits.com/

The Lord Passes before Moses
Photo Credit: www.bibleinbits.com

As we move further and further into the Psalms, I think that the tendency is just to brush over them and not really read them.  I mean, as far as chapters go this is by far the longest book in the Bible and we tend to start thinking that all of these Psalms are the same in one way or another.  Of course it is true that many of the Psalms use the same phrases, talk about the same things, and ultimately declare the same messages, but each one is special in its own way.  Each are individual models of how to praise, lament, thank, petition, and ultimately worship God.  Today we read through Psalm 86, which in verse 15 brings us back all the way to the book of Exodus using the name that the Lord gave Himself and proclaimed when He passed by Moses:

The Lord descended in the cloud and stood with him there, and proclaimed the name of the Lord. The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, “The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for thousands,forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.”

Why is this a big deal?  Because it is the name of God.  Moreover, it is really the best description of who God is and how God acts both then and now.  The words “gracious” and “merciful” are coupled with the name of God 12 times in the Old Testament, all of which show them to be some of the primary attributes of God.  I wonder if that is how we always think of God though, as one who is first and foremost gracious and merciful, and also slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.  I wonder if this is how the world see God… or if this is how Christians are actually proclaiming God…

While I wouldn’t pretend to claim that I know how all Christians preach about and describe God to the people that they meet every day, I think I can make a pretty educated guess as to what is being said based on the prevailing opinion of culture.  Do people see God as a deity who is abounding in steadfast love or one that is slow to anger?  I doubt it.  Why?  Take one look at the prevailing opinions on God right now or at the “gospel” that is being preached by many churches:  Moralistic, Therapeutic, Deism – ‘live a good life and be nice to people and God will give you nice things, and He might even help you occasionally when you get in to trouble.’

The Psalms & God A Call to Prayer Photo credit: www.cccooperagency.wordpress.com

The Psalms & God
A Call to Prayer
Photo credit: www.cccooperagency.wordpress.com

I don’t know about you, but to be honest, this is not at all the God of the Bible.  It certainly isn’t how God describes Himself either.  Time and time again we see God intimately involved in the lives of His creatures, sustaining and upholding all of creation.  We say that God is love, but also that He is very distant (deism)… these things seem to stand in conflict with each other.  How can you love someone and yet be ever distant and uncaring?

No… the deistic god is not the God of the Bible.  We worship and serve a God that is intimately involved and interested in our lives.  God loves us so much that, because of His overwhelming grace and mercy, He sent His Son to die for us which is the ultimate expression of love.  When we sin, He doesn’t turn away from us, but has compassion on us and welcomes us back with open arms.  God is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.

PSALM 85 is a psalm of lament written by the Korahites. This psalm is also interwoven with a breath of thanksgiving that walks the path of asking God for restoration and thanking Him for His actions.

PSALM 86 is a psalm of lament written by David.  Unlike most of David’s laments, this psalm has a section of hope and trust that is pasted right in the middle of the two sections of lament making this psalm end on a rather low note.

PSALM 87 is a psalm of praise written by the Korahites. This psalm is also prophetic in nature and stands as one of the psalms of Ascent that people would sing as they made their way up to Jerusalem and to the Temple for worship.

PSALM 88 is a psalm of lament that is attributed to both the Korahites and to Heman the Ezrahite.  This is probably the darkest of all the lament psalms as it seems to have no hope.  The writer does not make a turn towards trust or hope but truly feels as though the Lord has abandoned him which is interesting coming from a man named ‘Heman’ which in Hebrew means ‘faithful.’  This is the only psalm attributed to Heman.

PSALM 89 is a royal psalm written by Ethan the Ezrahite. This is the only psalm that is attributed to Ethan and proclaims the greatness and reign of God over all of creation.  Interestingly this psalm also takes a turn towards lament at the end, asking the same God that is exalted above creation to reveal Himself to the writer in the time of trouble.