2 John – Walk in Love

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Though 2 John is the shortest book in the Bible,  it is no less important because of the message that it carries.  The author, presumably the Apostle John, continues in the theme he carries throughout his writings, to show and live out the love of God daily.  John says that he is not giving them a “new command,” but rather is reiterating the one that Jesus gave to His disciples: love one another.  When we walk in love, we are walking with God and are obeying the commandments that God has given to us.  This is, as Jesus points out, the essence of the whole Law.

What is interesting here, and at other points in 1 John as well, is what it means for those who claim to be Christians to not love each other.  John says that they are “a deceiver and the antichrist.”  This may seem a bit extreme as we often think about the “antichrist” as being a person who will appear in the end times to openly oppose God and actively persecute Christians.  Views like this have been perpetuated in today’s culture by books like the “Left Behind” series and other “end times” type books.

Yet the way that John uses the term “antichrist” is one that references the work of the devil on a daily basis, not an evil figurehead.  In fact, if we were to follow this line of thinking, it makes sense that Satan is the antichrist, the one who opposes God in the world and that those who deny Jesus, those who do not love God or show God’s love for others participate in the work of Satan, the antichrist.

In the same way that those who love as God first loved them are in Christ and participating in the salvation and redemption of the world, following God’s lead and Lordship, so too are those who do not, participate in the Devil’s campaign against God and His work in the world.



Isaiah 64:1-9 "Advent Hope"



1 John 5 – Overcome

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Several times throughout this writing, John has talked about overcoming the world.  Whenever he says this, though, it doesn’t come in the context of us opposing the world through our own strength.  The victory that we have is and always will be in Jesus Christ alone. Our victory is founded in His victory over sin and death and, like we are raised with Him, we will also dwell with Him when He returns.

While this may seem a somewhat obvious reality for us, far too often we forget the primary place this needs to hold in our lives.  We like to claim that Jesus is Lord, but then we look to our government to protect us and provide for us.  Christians in the U.S. have created lobbying groups and other governmental entities to further advance a political agenda, rather than following the Gospel message to love those around us.  We try to overcome the world politically when the words of Scripture clearly point to Jesus Christ dwelling in us as the only way this could happen.

We worry and fret about the loss of religious freedom in this country, thinking that if we can’t gather on Sunday mornings all will be lost.  Our government makes decisions that are contrary to what we see as morally right, “Christian principles” that we read out of Scripture and are surprised.  None of this, the moral decline or the repressing of the Gospel should be surprising, though.  Christ Himself said that we shouldn’t be surprised by this but to take heart because they hated Him before they hated us.

He also reassures us, “Take heart for I have overcome the world.”  John writes that when Christ dwells in us, we have a strength greater than the world’s power and we too can not only resist the temptations of this world but overcome them by “the blood of the lamb and the word of our testimony” as John will testify to in the book of revelation.



1 John 4 – Don't Deny

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John continues to talk about love in this chapter, something that we could never really say enough about.  God’s love, shown by Him and reflected in us is such a vital part of who we are in Christ and how we come to be just that.  John’s words on this could go on forever.

He also briefly talks here about the ability to recognize the Spirit of God in those around us.  This is also an important thing for us to think about especially in the current culture that would seek to offer us “pseudo-Christian” teachings that do not necessarily jive with Scripture.  How can we know that these things are “of God”?  John points out that any teaching that claims to be Christian in nature, any teaching or spirit that claims to be of the Bible, will first and foremost acknowledge the Incarnation of Jesus Christ.

What does this mean?  For starters, it means that it will be in line with Jesus, His life, death, resurrection, and teaching.  In other words: It will match up with “The Word” as John refers to Him as.  Jesus Himself is the Word of God made flesh, the fulfillment of all that Scripture says.  Therefore, any and all teachings that are of God will acknowledge Jesus as Lord first and foremost.

There are a number of religious groups that claim the “Christian” title but don’t do this.  Their messages sound good, their church buildings look spectacular, and their message is often well disguised to motivate and uplift their listeners.  However, it is not of God.

Once again, John is warning his readers that they need to be clear on who and what they are loving.  Messages that are meant to make us feel good but don’t acknowledge Jesus as Lord (or our sin for that matter) are ultimately self-serving and betrays us to the sin of idolatry of self.



Psalm 145:1-7 "Giving Thanks"



1 John 3 – What Great Love!

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John continues his emphasis on love, now turning to the love that God has shown us in Jesus Christ.  Whereas in chapter two, John was giving direction on who and how to love, as well as where not to place our love, now he shows the example of perfect love that comes only from God.

God’s infinite love is beyond amazing.  Far too often we talk about it in a limited fashion, referencing it simply to the forgiveness or sins, or God not getting mad at us when we don’t live the way He calls us to.  Both of those are true statements but fail to get anywhere close to the far-reaching depth of God’s love.

Through the love of God shown in Jesus Christ, we aren’t just given a free pass, God actually adopts us as His own, calling us His children and, as Scripture says, making us heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ.  Our old self, the sinful dirty part of us, is put to death, washed away, and completely covered Jesus Christ, whom God sees when He looks at us.

There is very intentional imagery being used here because it gets at the importance and intimacy of the relationship that develops here as well.  God is the loving Father who lavishes love on His Son and on us as those who are marked with His Son’s blood.

In response to this, John writes, we should love one another.  When he says this, he is using the same form of the word “love,” meaning that our love for each other should be modeled after God’s love for us.  This is supposed to be the foundation for our relationships with each other in the Christian community and with all of those we come in contact with.

It is enough to say that we fail at this often.  But John also offers a reminder and an encouragement that we have hope in God, that He is greater than our sins, and both forgives us and works to build into us and shape us more into the image of His Son.



1 John 2 – Loving the Other

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Echoing Jesus’ words and directives to love, John writes here encouraging his readers to show love to each other.  He even goes so far as to say that those who don’t love their brother, a word which we could exchange readily with the word “neighbor”, do not have Christ in them.  While this may not seem like a dramatic statement, but when we look at these words in combination with chapter one, John is essentially saying that those who don’t love others are the same as those walking in darkness, they have not encountered God.

Indeed, John writes in his Gospel that Jesus says the world will know we are His disciples by our love.  This comes in sharp contrast to how many Christian denominations act today, defining themselves not by the love that they show to those around them, but by the high towers of theology they have built for themselves.  Far too often, our “doctrines” and “theology” create an interpretation of Scripture that divides rather than bids of to love.

There is, however, a limit to the love that we are to show as well.  While loving our neighbor is an essential part of the Christian life, loving the world is not.  In fact, loving the world actually brings the same determination as those who do not love at all: they do not have Christ in them.

Loving the world means loving the things of this world more that God.  John lists these things as bring primarily related to lust and pride, out of which I’m sure we could track most of the common sins of our lives.

Finally, John talks very intentionally about what it means to deny Jesus.  For John this might have been a very personal thing for him to say, remembering Peter’s denial of Jesus and recording the reinstatement of Peter in his Gospel.  He encourages his readers to remain faithful, reminding them that their calling and anointing comes from God alone and cannot be changed, even by their own actions.  This is an important reminder of Christian identity, something that has implications to everyone who believes.



1 John 1 – Life and Light

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The Apostle John opens His Gospel talking about the incarnation of Christ as the theological foundation that supports the rest of his book.  He says there, of Jesus, “In Him was life, and that light was the light of mankind.”

John opens his first letter, though not in letter format, with the very same themes.  Jesus is the incarnation of God in human flesh and He, being the very Word of God, brought with and in Him life.  The life that Jesus brought, that He offers to us, is also the invitation to have fellowship with God, to be in a relationship with Him.

He then continues into a practical application of what this means as we live into this in the life of faith.  Once again, John uses the contrast of light and darkness to describe those who follow Christ, the light of the world, and those who don’t.

There is a very important theological principle that is hidden in this first chapter.  We often talk about the Gospel message and the “Good News” of Jesus Christ as being all about grace and being saved from our sins and this is entirely true.  Yet to be saved from anything, there needs to be an acknowledgment of the need for saving.  In John’s words here, if we say that we are without sin, we are deceiving ourselves and we continue to walk in darkness.

In Jesus Christ, God brings light, life, and salvation into the world, redeeming and restoring our ability to live in relationship with Him.  Jesus is the only way that this could happen; there is no way we can save ourselves.  So, while we rightly emphasize the grace of God, the only way that this grace is important is because of the sin we find ourselves in.  John says that if claim that we have not sinned, we make a liar out of God.  In reality, we know full well of our depravity and when we acknowledge that, as uncomfortable as it may be, we can embrace the saving grace of Jesus Christ and live true life, in true light and freedom.



Introduction to the Letters of John

Though the Apostle John is widely believed to be and accepted as the author of the author of the letters in the Bible that bear his name, he is never directly identified in them as Paul and Peter are in their letters.  This has, in the past, led to speculation about who it was that actually wrote these letters.  Both second and third John begin by identifying the author as “the elder” while first John doesn’t even take the form of the letter.

The question of authorship throughout the Bible is an academic and intellectual argument that, while of secondary importance, does not change the nature of the book or its purpose, function, or place within God’s Word.  We believe that, as Scripture was canonized (the process by which books of Scripture were chosen to be in what we know as the Bible), the Holy Spirit was active in working in the lives and decisions that were made, regardless of who actually authored the book.  God’s truth, revealed in the Words of the Bible, does not depend on who wrote it, and the veracity (truthfulness) of Scripture is not at stake because of this either.  In fact, it was a rather common practice for those who learned from, studied under, and followed leaders to write in their name during, and especially after their lives.

There is plenty of “internal evidence” to support the authorship of the Apostle John here as well.  These three letters contain a great deal of similar language to that of the Gospel of John.  When we look at a number of the themes that are covered, even how John opens His first letter beginning with the incarnation like He does in His Gospel, it is pretty clear that if the Apostle John didn’t write it, someone, who followed Him closely and learned from him, definitely did.



Numbers 33 & Deuteronomy 4-11 – Leaving Egypt – Home: End or Beginning?

1. How has this journey shaped your understanding of freedom in the Christian life? How is God calling you to a new sense of freedom in your own life?

2. Moses warns that the influence of Egypt can continue to be strong in our lives, that living in a way contrary to full freedom and identity that God offers us is like Egypt in our lives. Have you experienced this? Is God calling you out of some form of Egypt in your life today?

3. How do Christians typically define the “Promised Land,” the happy or virtuous life? How does the Church often define this?

4. Do we treat Christianity as an end unto itself or does faith become the catalyst for a greater mission? Are we willing to settle for the comfort of our church pews or do we live into our call as “the light of the world?”

5. Read Matthew 5:3-12. What do the Beatitudes invite you to in your own life? How does this relate to our Exodus journey? How might living into this new reality change the way you relate, the way you play, the way you work, and more?

6. In what ways have we as a church settled for comfort and familiarity rather than being the “light of the world”? How can we step out of our comfort zone and further live into the identity that God has given to us?

7. In what ways is HCRC being a light? What can we do to continue to foster these things and even create new opportunities for flourishing and growth in this community?
*Some questions taken from Leaving Egypt, by Chuck DeGroat



2 Peter 3 – Slowness

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When we look around at the world and see so much of the awful things that are going on, we often echo the words of Scripture, “How long oh Lord?”  Our liturgies include in them a bid for Jesus to come back soon and even our worship music emphasizes this at times.  The truth is that we long for Jesus’ return so that all things in this world will be put right once again.

Christians in the days of the early church longed for this as well.  In fact, most figured that Jesus would be back in their lifetime.  However, when that did not come to pass, and especially as the great persecution broke out against the church, people began to wonder when the time would be that Jesus would come back.

This is not necessarily a bad thing to wonder about.  It does, however, create some “fertile soil” for the seeds of doubt to grow, especially if those scoffers that Peter talks about here were to come and try to grow their seeds with scoffing and questions.

Peter, in his desire to feed God’s sheep, does a lot here to put things into perspective.  We are really only capable of thinking in terms of our own lives or known history at best.  This reveals our finite ability to understand both time as we know it and God’s time (and timing).  God stands outside of time, holding the whole of eternity in His hands and so, it is understandable that God’s work and will may also be outside the scope of our vision and understanding.

God’s original promise to Abraham took somewhere between 1500 and 2000 years to come true in Jesus, but it did come true.  In the same way, Jesus’ promise to return and God’s promise to complete His redemptive work, bringing all things under Christ and making everything right, destroying wickedness and evil forever, will come true in God’s perfect time.

Why the delay?  Well, who is to say that there is a delay?  It feels like that for us but for God, it’s right on time.  More than this, though, we see in God’s timing a true act of love and mercy, desiring that none would perish but that as many people as possible would come to know His love and mercy.

This is a very deep perspective that we need to keep as we think about Jesus’ coming.  Though we long for that “great and terrible” day, we also need to remember that each day we are here, each day that Jesus does not return is another day for us to spread God’s love and grace so that none would perish.



2 Peter 2 – Wallowing in the Mud

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Peter warns of false teachers, those who were among the church and those on the outside that were spreading heresy, false teachings among the community of faith.  Paul also warned of this when he wrote, urging the people to hold onto what they had learned in the truth of the Gospel.

False teaching was very prevalent in their time.  A number of different versions of Christian teaching were being put forth in churches throughout the Roman Empire.  Sometimes, I would guess, it was hard for them to decipher truth from falsehood.

Today’s church has this same problem.  There are a number of different groups that are at work within the church trying to use the Gospel message for their own personal gain.  It is easy for us to spot the more obvious heresies and false teachings.  Other religions and those who blatantly deny Christ are Lord and Savior are obvious.  We must be careful about the less obvious ones; they are much more dangerous becuase they are insidious, creeping gradually into our faith and belief structure.

So if these false beliefs are dangerous and sneeky, the obvious question that Peter adresses here is “who do we recognize them?”  First and foremost, we must always be checking what people say against Scripture itself.  If teachings fall contrary to what the whole of Scripture reveals to be true, then it is wrong.  The other way that Peter talks about here is by looking at the conduct of the teacher.  He speaks to these false teachers as being depraved, seeking to exploit, greedy, and arrogant.

Peter concludes this chapter by speaking a humorous and yet all to real truth with regards to false teachers; “a dog returns to its vomit.”  When it comes to false teachings, there is one thing that will always be a clue: when push comes to shove, false teaching always returns to the strength of the argument or some human experience, not on fundamental truths that we find in Scripture.



2 Peter 1 – All We Need

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As Peter opens his second letter, he spends a great deal of time emphasizing the identity of the recipients.  He reminds us that our identity is secure in Christ and that God has given to us everything that we need to live into this reality of our lives.  This was likely a needed reminder for those he was writing to considering the hard times that they were dealing with.  It is a necessary reminder for us all that time as well, considering the pressures and competing worldviews that culture throws at us every day.

Peter encourages believers, in the midst of the spiritual battle that we are in, to strengthen our faith and our witness through adding a number of things to our lives.  Each of these, goodness, knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, mutual affection, and love, are elements of the life of faith that we are called to live.  Each are attributes of God, parts of His character that are revealed through Christ Jesus.

Like everything that we talk about when it comes to faith, Peter is not talking about a sort of “works righteousness” way of living, but rather a deepening of the faith that we have which will in turn cause us to live in a greater way into the calling that we have received as children of God and heirs to His promises.

Why does Scripture continually come back to this?  Peter points out here that, even though his readers are firmly established in the truth, he wants always to remind them of these things.  This is an important aspect of what why we read Scripture and worship together as Christians.  In this world, where so many different things trying to suck us into their own identity, we need to be reminded constantly of who we are and whose we are.  So often we forget in one fashion or another, straying all over the place.  For this reason, we remain committed to Scripture and to prayer, seeking God and listening for the Spirit’s voice to remind us and direct us each day.



1 Peter 5 – Leadership

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Leadership is a pretty hot topic these days and those who work to coach and help leaders are doing great work to equip and empower leaders to lead well.  Peter has a number of things to say to the leaders of the church as well as they continue to lead in tumultuous times.  What I think is important to notice about what Peter says here, though, is not that he has given them some great strategy to lead, but rather than he has encouraged them to follow Christ’s example by imitating Him.

There has been a lot done in the last 20 years in the church to create strategies for leadership and development, for ministries and programs that will work to attract more people and grow the church.  The “seeker service” movement along with “contemporary” worship music and coffee bars in the church have all been ways that churches have sought to attract people or be “relevant.”

Now, I’m not at all opposed to good coffee, and I doubt Peter would have been either, but the much of what has been done in the church over these last two decades has completely missed the point of the church.  We aren’t supposed to be building internal programs that bring people in, we’re supposed to be following the example of Christ.  Jesus didn’t set up a church building and then require people to come, Jesus went out to minister among the sick, the poor, the sinners, and the outcasts.

Now, that’s not to say that there isn’t something important about the Church or about the local community of faith.  Indeed there are many benefits to meeting together, of being together, and of worshipping together.  However, if those things become an end unto themselves, we have completely missed the purpose of the church.  If leaders in the church simply work to facilitate the function of the organization so that we can continue to keep our doors open, we’re failing at what we’re supposed to be doing.

Peter’s words call us to imitate the “Chief Shepherd” so that we can show the world who Christ is.  We do this by showing Christ’s love and following His example, ministering among and with the least, the last, and the lost.



1 Peter 4 – Surprise?

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Peter is writing in a time of great persecution, but even in this, he tells his readers to “not be surprised” at the suffering that they are facing.  In fact, other parts of Scripture tell us that, because we are following Christ, we can expect persecution and suffering.  However, Peter wants to make a qualification here, clarifying the both why we suffer persecution as Christians and for what reason.

Part of suffering and persecution as Christians is participating in Christ’s sufferings.  Jesus said that the world would hate His followers because it hated Him first.  That said, Peter also wants the reader to make sure and understand that our sufferings, the persecution that we face, perhaps even the backlash from the world that we face, is happening to us because of the fact that we are Christ followers… not for other reasons.

This, I think, is an important distinction to make.  Christians today are often seen complaining about this and that, things that are going on in the government and in our culture that are counter to what we believe to be morally right or Scripturally sound.  Yet, when it comes down to it, not a lot of those things really “oppress” or “persecute” us.

What Peter is referring to here is the physical attacks that were happening to the Christian community during that time.  The government and many other people were working to limit the spread of the Gospel through the persecution of the church.  Peter makes sure to point out that it is for the Gospel that we should be suffering, not other reasons in our lives.

Nowadays, there is a number of ideological, cultural, and even personal things that we can stand up for and for which we could receive backlash.  All of those, however, pale in comparison to the “honor” and “joy” we have to suffer for the Gospel.

Do you think that the church in North America “suffers” for the Gospel?  Does society see the Gospel message as such a threat to us that they try to put us down and keep us under wraps?  Or are they just going about their business, tuning out our complaints, not worried that we’re really going to make that much of a difference?