Introduction to Philippians

Paul’s letter to the church in Philippi is uniquely positive in character, thanking the church for the gift it sent him while he was imprisoned in Rome.  Throughout the letter, though, Paul takes the opportunity to encourage the church in the midst of persecution and to exhort them to humility and unity within the faith community there.

The city of Philippi had a very unique and sorted history, being named after a Greek king, Philip the second, who conquered the city and named it after himself.  In the time of the Roman Empire, Philippi was a prosperous city which was located on the main highway that connected the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire with Rome itself.  This road, known as the Egnatian Way, was both the lifeline of the city and also the reason for its prosperity.  Philippi was also unique in that very few Jews lived within the city.  This may account for the fact that Paul’s letter to the church here contains no direct quotations of the Old Testament.

Philippi was located in Macedonia, in what is now northern Greece. Photo Credit: www.holylandphotos.org

Philippi was located in Macedonia, in what is now northern Greece.
Photo Credit: www.holylandphotos.org

Acts 16 records Paul’s first visit to the city of Philippi in roughly A.D. 50-51, on his second missionary journey.  Following a vision that God gave him, Paul and his traveling companions made the journey to Macedonia and preached the Gospel to those he met there.  Out of that came the conversion of Lydia, a particularly prominent woman in the early church whose hospitality and leadership are noted by Paul in Scripture.

The book of Philippians expresses a very practical and yet rigorous type of Christian living, commending its readers to follow the very example of Christ as it is expressed in chapter 2.  This is widely considered to be one of the most profound Christological passages in the New Testament.


One Response to “Introduction to Philippians”

  1. […] was also located on a major junction of the great Egnatian Way, the same trade route that the city of Philippi was located on, where a road split off and headed north to the Danube river.  This made the city a […]

Leave a Reply