Day 216: Isaiah 61-64: The Coming Day of the Lord

There is a lot to be said about the end times.  Especially now as we see things and around the world get progressively worse (depending on your point of view), and culture take a moral nosedive, the talk of the time that Christ returns and when God makes all things right is greater than it ever has been before.  We’ve seen cults come and go, denominations split over eschatological views, the books upon book being written about what things will be like, when these things will happen, and how it will all play out when they do.  Often times we find people quoting Isaiah, Daniel, and Revelation as source material for their views on specific events and timelines for how the return of Christ will be ushered in.  Some people have even gone so far as to predict dates and times, all of which have failed of course, that Christ will come back.  Laughably, to date, we have survived well over 100 end of the world scenarios as well as, what could be considered countless dates in which Christ was to supposedly return.

Yet this topic is one that is rather heavy in the Bible.  It is spoken of quite frequently throughout the Old Testament, in the prophets especially, and is addressed at length in the New Testament (specifically in Revelation) and by Jesus Himself while He was still on earth.  There are few topics that are more controversial and have been more divisive in the Christian Church than that of eschatology.  However, in that same vein, there are few topics that are truly less important from a salvation aspect than that of Eschatology.  As a member of the Reformed Church, growing up in the Reformed tradition, and studying the Bible at a Reformed Seminary, I know what my denomination believes, and I also know the arguments for different denominations and thought processes for the 4 main eschatological views of the Church.  However, it is not my intent to promote one over the others here today.  In fact, I truly believe that the divisiveness that this topic has had in the Church has really come from us making central a belief or viewpoint that is truly peripheral to the Christian faith.  Isaiah, Daniel, Revelation, and the myriad of other places in the Bible that this is addressed would seem to substantiate this opinion as well.  Instead of talking about what is going to happen and how, these Scriptural texts paint an image for us of what life will be like when it happens.  Today’s reading is just one of those passages.

Our text today starts our with Scripture that Jesus Himself reads at the beginning of His ministry:

The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me,
    because the Lord has anointed me
to bring good news to the poor;
    he has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
to proclaim liberty to the captives,
    and the opening of the prison to those who are bound;
to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor…

Jesus says, in Luke 4, after reading this text that it is indeed fulfilled by His reading it and the people hearing it.  Knowing this, we have to believe that this text in Isaiah is directly linked to the Incarnation of Jesus.  With this in mind, we have to also understand all of these texts, which seems to contain the same themes, are inexplicably linked to Jesus Christ as they are all about the day of the Lord.  Sure, these passages talk about many different topics about the day of the Lord, namely Salvation, vengeance, mercy, and freedom, but these are all subtopics of the same event, the coming of the Lord.

Some may ask though, if this passage was fulfilled when Jesus came, why has not all of this happened yet?  Clearly the world is still quite messed up, things are obviously not as the should be.  They would be right in saying this.  Salvation has come; Jesus came and lived the life that we could not and died the death that we deserve.  He opened for us the path to God once again so that we could be in relationship with Him.  Jesus’ actions in healing the sick and driving out demons was but a foretaste of the judgment and wrath against sin that is to come.  However, the same healing, love, mercy, and forgiveness that Jesus showed people is a foretaste of what is to come in when He comes again.  Sin was defeated; sin is defeated.  What we are experiencing now can only be described as the death throws of one whose doom is assured.  Restoration is coming and all will be made right on that great and glorious day when we will see Jesus face to face and the dwelling of God will be here on Earth (oops, that is a bit of Reformed Theology – reference Revelation 21).  We do not truly know when this will happen, or the specific series of events.  Will there be a rapture?  Will there be a literal 1,000 year reign?  We’ll explore these topics around Christmas time.  What is important is that we know and have hope in the fact that Jesus has promised that He will come back.  His return is assured.  The restoration of the world is assured.  As the Church, we should be working to usher in this Kingdom here on Earth, and leave the details of how and when to God alone.


4 Responses to “Day 216: Isaiah 61-64: The Coming Day of the Lord”

  1. […] to His hometown of Nazareth and teaches in the synagogue.  His first Scripture lesson comes from the prophet Isaiah, a teaching about the day of the Lord and the coming of the Messiah.  After reading it, Jesus […]

  2. […] and the only one who can both heal us and give our lives true meaning, God.  Isaiah writes, at the end of his book, that our works are like filthy rags without the Lord to redeem […]

  3. […] Isaiah 61:1 – The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me, because the Lord has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor.  He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners, […]

  4. […] Isaiah 61:1 – The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me, because the Lord has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor.  He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners, […]

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