Day 134: 2 Chronicles 35-36; Josiah Through Zedekiah and the Exile

The final chapters of the book of 2 Chronicles ends in much the same way the the book of 2 Kings draws to a close.  Josiah, after celebrating the Passover with the people of Judah and many that come from the decimated Northern Kingdom of Israel, makes a grave error (no pun intended).  All of this happens around 600 BC during rise of the Babylonian Empire.  Pharaoh Neco, also known as Necho II, honoring an alliance that has been formed with Assyria, needs to travel north to aid the Assyrian military in its resistance against Babylon.  To do this, he must travel through the land of Judah, something King Josiah doesn’t allow.  The resulting battle on the plains of Megiddo ends in Josiah’s death and the first “conquering” of Judah by Egypt.  Judah becomes a vassal state of Egypt, paying tribute to Pharaoh, having a king that was installed by Pharaoh Neco on the throne.

The Fall of Jerusalem: The Temple Burned Photo Credit: www.users.vic.chariot.net.au

The Fall of Jerusalem: The Temple Burned
Photo Credit: www.users.vic.chariot.net.au

Oddly enough, even in all of this turmoil, we can see in many ways how God is at work.  Unfortunately the first way is in the words of Neco, which the writer of Chronicles tells us is actually the words of God.  Somehow, in God’s grander plan, Egypt is meant to go up and fight against Babylon.  We could speculate on this for a good long while.  Perhaps Egypt and Assyria were being used to protect the now revived people of God from the increasing threat of the Babylonians?  Perhaps this was a test to see if Josiah was listening for the Word of the Lord?  Who knows… What happens though, is also an amazing act of God.  It is unusual for a leader of a foreign country to install a member of the country’s royal family as the ruler after deposing the current ruler.  Yet God is at work, preserving the line of David just as He promised He would.  Even in all of this chaos, God is still very much in control of things.

The decline of Judah is recorded in rapid succession in chapter 36, although the reality is that it took over 20 years from Josiah’s death for the final collapse of Judah to actually take place.  Josiah died in roughly 609 BC and the fall of Jerusalem takes place in 586 BC.  In that time we read that none of the kings that are in place do anything that remotely resembles anything good in the sight of the Lord.  Even during this time though we see that God tries and tries to get the attention of His people.  We read that God has compassion on them, despite all the evil they are doing.  He sends a number of prophets, many of whom we will read in the coming months to warn the people of the impending doom that is coming, to beseech them to turn back to God, yet all of it seems to be in vain.

Map of the Exile and Resettlement Photo Credit: http://levantnotes.blogspot.com/2007/10/of-israel-myth_20.html

Map of the Exile and Resettlement
Photo Credit: www.levantnotes.blogspot.com

There is a common thread that runs through these last few chapters that I see when I read them.  It has to do with the voice of God.  Throughout the life of Israel, both the united and divided kingdoms, we read a great deal about the voice of God.  It comes from the priests and the prophets, even from the book of the Law.  Sometimes it comes from random places, like the mouth of a Pharaoh.  Yet it is always present.  What is presented to us here is what happens when a ruler and a nation do not listen for, recognize, or pay attention to the voice of God.  Scripture says, “The Lord, the God of their fathers, sent persistently to them by his messengers, because he had compassion on his people and on his dwelling place. But they kept mocking the messengers of God, despising his words and scoffing at his prophets, until the wrath of the Lord rose against his people, until there was no remedy.”  The result was the complete destruction of a nation and their exile.  While I hesitate to draw any direct connections to our country from the Bible, I think these words could ring loud and clear for the Church today.  Do we know where God is speaking?  Do we recognize the messengers that He is sending?  Or do we laugh and mock them… until their is no remedy for us either…

All is not lost… exile is not permanent… God is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.  We read at the end of this book the bridge into next books of Ezra and Nehemiah, which tell the story of those returned, those for which the books of the Chronicles were written.


7 Responses to “Day 134: 2 Chronicles 35-36; Josiah Through Zedekiah and the Exile”

  1. riprap06 says:

    I wish I knew how to do my blog like you. I really enjoyed your scripture and writing. The pictures add so much. I just don’t know how to add them into my post…. Thank you for posting such inspiration…

  2. […] to you, it is because we talked about this in the books of Ezra and Nehemiah, as well as at the end of the book of 2 Chronicles.  Whether this is prophecy, history, or a mix I guess is up to the reader and the scholars, but […]

  3. […] first happened during the reign of Jehoiachin when the city of Jerusalem was actually spared.  For more on this you can check out 2 Chronicles 36 & 2 Kings 24.  Ezekiel’s writing comes from the land […]

  4. […] Josiah Through Zedekiah and the Exile 2 Chronicles 35-36 […]

  5. […] back with me to the stories of Abraham, Jacob, Moses, the Exodus, David, and then forward to the exile.  All of these narratives in Scripture depict some of the greater times of wilderness experiences […]

  6. […] “‘Did you bring to me slain beasts and sacrifices,     during the forty years in the wilderness, O house of Israel? You took up the tent of Moloch     and the star of your god Rephan,     the images that you made to worship; and I will send you into exile beyond Babylon.’ […]

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