Matthew 24:36-51 "Keep Watch"

Discussions and questions about the End Times can be confusing, difficult, and nuanced.  Jesus cuts through all that, giving us a specific understanding that we cannot and do not know the details and therefore, we must keep watch and be ready for it will come when we least expect it.



Matthew 22:34-40; 28:18-20 "God is at Work"

Al Gemmen, InnerCHANGE Miami



Genesis 12:1-3; Matthew 28:18-20; & Acts 2:39 – "Let's Talk About Baptism"



Matthew 6:5-15 "Teach Us To Pray"

Prayer is one of the most vital parts of the Christian life.  This morning we begin a new sermon series walking through the Lord’s prayer and learning from Jesus how He taught His disciples to pray and how our prayer life can impact how we live the life of faith.

Pastor Sarah Farkas preaching.



Matthew 28:1-10 "Is There Hope?"

At the very core of all the questions that we ask, we want to know that there is hope for something better.  On Easter morning, God answers this question with a resounding “YES,” bringing Jesus back from the dead and conquering death forever.

Pastor Sarah Farkas preaching.



Matthew 27:27-31 "What About Suffering?"

The question of suffering is always before us, especially the question of why God allows it.  Some questions we don’t have the answers to, but the Bible is very clear that, no matter what comes our way, God will be there building us up and through it, making us more like Christ.



Matthew 28 – Sabbath & Re-Creation

Read Matthew 28

The Sabbath day is one of the most significant days in Jewish life.  Apart from humanity being the crown of creation, the significance of the Sabbath is the first declaration in Genesis 2.  Today I am struck by the fact that Jesus’ full day in the tomb is the Sabbath day, the day of rest.

In Hebrews 10, the author makes this connection between the work accomplished by Christ.  His once for all sacrifice for the sins of the whole world ushers believers into a “sabbath rest,” the reality that we no longer have to do ritual sacrifices to gain forgiveness.  Instead, we rest in the assurance of faith in Jesus Christ and that we are heirs of eternal life.

It is no coincidence then, that Jesus resurrection happens on the first day of the week then, the same day that God begins work on creation, the day that New Life is sealed in Christ’s defeat of death itself.  The work of God in creating the world and the work of Christ is redeeming it, bringing new life out of death are intimately related, and the theme of Sabbath flows through both.

Too often we subscribe to the idea that we have to do a lot of work for ourselves to earn a place in God’s Kingdom, to repay Him for what He did for us.  We Christians set up laws for ourselves, never saying that we have to earn salvation, but often implying it.  Certainly we are called to live out our faith, fulfilling the great commission to make disciples, but we do this out of grateful obedience, not to earn our salvation.  When we act as though we need to earn the grace we are given, we unknowingly diminish the power and work of Jesus on the cross.



Matthew 27 – Irony

Read Matthew 27

I’ve read and heard about Jesus’ death a countless number of times in my life.  However, in reading this today, I am struck by the repeated irony in all that was said to and about Jesus during the process of his conviction and crucifixion.  Matthew does not record Jesus’ request to the Father for the forgiveness of those who did this to Him, but truly the did not know anything about what they did.

The people cry out that Jesus’ “blood be on us and our children.”  Little do they know how much they truly want that to be true.

The soldiers bow down before Jesus and say “Hail, King of the Jews.”  Little do they know how they will be doing that for real one day.

The people walking by, beckoning Him to come down from the cross if He “truly is the Son of God.”  Little do they know that this is right where the Son of God needed to be.

The religious leaders chide that they will believe if Jesus comes down from the cross.  They mock Jesus for trusting in God.  Little do they know the trust that Jesus had for the plan of salvation being carried out at that very moment.

It wasn’t until Jesus’ last breath when all this had taken place that one man, a soldier guarding Jesus’ cross, recognizes the truth of Jesus’ identity.  But that acclimation wasn’t too late, it was the beginning of billions of faith professions that would follow since that day.

Once again we are reminded that God’s ways are not our ways.  Even when we think we know how God should act, we must submit our trust to God whose ways and love are far higher and greater than we could ever ask or imagine.



Matthew 26 – Put Your Sword Away

Read Matthew 26

There is so much that could be covered in today’s chapter.  Matthew puts much of the “passion narrative” together into chapters 26 and 27 which makes drawing out specific themes somewhat difficult.  However, the thing that strikes me the most here is the way that Jesus approaches what is about to take place.

It is clear that there is some apprehension; Jesus struggles with the “cup” He is to bear.  However, He is never unwilling and He never resists.  Indeed, this whole chapter is marked by Jesus’ willingness for the task set before Him.  Hebrew 12 says, “For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.”  The Joy?!?  For me, that seems unfathomable.

This is another example of how the Kingdom of Heaven looks; not the suffering, but the willful setting aside of one’s self for the sake of others.  Jesus has said many times that the one who will be great in God’s Kingdom is the one who humbles him/herself and takes on the role of a servant.  In the Gospel of John Jesus says, “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.”

God’s Kingdom will not come about through the forceful conquest of military or weapons.  It will not come through advanced technology nor will it come from protesting loudly against culture.  The Kingdom of Heaven is revealed in the humble acts of those who love and serve their neighbor, their family, and their friends.

I wonder what the Church would look like if we focused in on living out God’s love in this way.  I wonder if the marginalization that the church experiences right now would fade if we lived and loved as Christ did.



Matthew 25 – Kingdom Investment

Read Matthew 25

Wise investing is one of the smartest things we can do with the money God has blessed us with.  While Jesus warns about allowing money to master us, we also must recognize the wisdom in future planning.  This could be illustrated in the Parable of the Talents.  However, I don’t think that money was on our Lord’s mind when He spoke this parable.

A talent was something very valuable.  It regulated the exchange of currency in those days.  But what is important in this teaching is not the “amount” or the “type” but rather what was done with it.  When the Master returns, it isn’t the amount of talent returned that mattered, otherwise the man with 5 would have received more praise than the one with 2, but the fact that they had put those talents to work and returned more than what was originally given them.

I have heard it preached before that these “talents” are related to our own gifts and abilities, that we should put them to work so that God receives a return on His investment in us; an apt metaphor to be sure.  However, keeping with the rest of this passage, I wonder if the meaning we are to gain from this comes from its relation to the parable of the sheep and the goats.

James 1 says that we are not to merely be “hearers” of God’s Word, but “doers.”  Those who were welcomed into the Kingdom were those that did something with the Word, “invested the talent” if you will.  Jesus said earlier that a tree will be known by its fruit.  Perhaps that is the fruit that comes from the sowing of the seed that is God’s Word in us which, in good soil, yields a crop far greater than what was sown.