Lent Day 45: Luke 23:26-56

Read: Luke 23:26-56

The Crucifixion of Jesus

26 As the soldiers led him away, they seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus. 27 A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. 28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. 29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the childless women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then

“‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!”
    and to the hills, “Cover us!”’

31 For if people do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?”

32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed. 33 When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him there, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left. 34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.

35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One.”

36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar 37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”

38 There was a written notice above him, which read: this is the king of the jews.

39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself and us!”

40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence? 41 We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.”

42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”

43 Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.”

The Death of Jesus

44 It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon, 45 for the sun stopped shining. And the curtain of the temple was torn in two. 46 Jesus called out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.” When he had said this, he breathed his last.

47 The centurion, seeing what had happened, praised God and said, “Surely this was a righteous man.” 48 When all the people who had gathered to witness this sight saw what took place, they beat their breasts and went away. 49 But all those who knew him, including the women who had followed him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things.

The Burial of Jesus

50 Now there was a man named Joseph, a member of the Council, a good and upright man, 51 who had not consented to their decision and action. He came from the Judean town of Arimathea, and he himself was waiting for the kingdom of God. 52 Going to Pilate, he asked for Jesus’ body. 53 Then he took it down, wrapped it in linen cloth and placed it in a tomb cut in the rock, one in which no one had yet been laid. 54 It was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin.

55 The women who had come with Jesus from Galilee followed Joseph and saw the tomb and how his body was laid in it. 56 Then they went home and prepared spices and perfumes. But they rested on the Sabbath in obedience to the commandment.

Listen:

What stands out to you in this chapter?
Is there anything you are hearing in a new way?
Luke seems to record that Jesus’ wasn’t taken by death, but rather that he submitted to it, dying only after He gave up His spirit.  Read Philippians 2:5-11.  What do we learn from this and how should it impact our lives?

Pray:

For the person/family you’re inviting to join you for worship on Easter Sunday.
Don’t forget to spend time listening as well!


Lent Day 44: Luke 23:1-25

Read: Luke 23:1-25

Then the whole assembly rose and led him off to Pilate. And they began to accuse him, saying, “We have found this man subverting our nation. He opposes payment of taxes to Caesar and claims to be Messiah, a king.”

So Pilate asked Jesus, “Are you the king of the Jews?”

“You have said so,” Jesus replied.

Then Pilate announced to the chief priests and the crowd, “I find no basis for a charge against this man.”

But they insisted, “He stirs up the people all over Judea by his teaching. He started in Galilee and has come all the way here.”

On hearing this, Pilate asked if the man was a Galilean. When he learned that Jesus was under Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who was also in Jerusalem at that time.

When Herod saw Jesus, he was greatly pleased, because for a long time he had been wanting to see him. From what he had heard about him, he hoped to see him perform a sign of some sort. He plied him with many questions, but Jesus gave him no answer. 10 The chief priests and the teachers of the law were standing there, vehemently accusing him. 11 Then Herod and his soldiers ridiculed and mocked him. Dressing him in an elegant robe, they sent him back to Pilate. 12 That day Herod and Pilate became friends—before this they had been enemies.

13 Pilate called together the chief priests, the rulers and the people, 14 and said to them, “You brought me this man as one who was inciting the people to rebellion. I have examined him in your presence and have found no basis for your charges against him. 15 Neither has Herod, for he sent him back to us; as you can see, he has done nothing to deserve death. 16 Therefore, I will punish him and then release him.” [17] 

18 But the whole crowd shouted, “Away with this man! Release Barabbas to us!” 19 (Barabbas had been thrown into prison for an insurrection in the city, and for murder.)

20 Wanting to release Jesus, Pilate appealed to them again. 21 But they kept shouting, “Crucify him! Crucify him!”

22 For the third time he spoke to them: “Why? What crime has this man committed? I have found in him no grounds for the death penalty. Therefore I will have him punished and then release him.”

23 But with loud shouts they insistently demanded that he be crucified, and their shouts prevailed. 24 So Pilate decided to grant their demand. 25 He released the man who had been thrown into prison for insurrection and murder, the one they asked for, and surrendered Jesus to their will.

Listen:

What stands out to you in this chapter?
Is there anything you are hearing in a new way?
All of the Gospels show Jesus was declared innocent based on human laws.  Why do you think this is so important and what does it tell us about Jesus’ crucifixion?

Pray:

Maundy Thursday.  Join us for worship at 6:00 PM.
For the person/family you’re inviting to join you for worship on Easter Sunday.
Don’t forget to spend time listening as well!


Lent Day 43: Luke 22:39-71

Read: Luke 22:39-71

Jesus Prays on the Mount of Olives

39 Jesus went out as usual to the Mount of Olives, and his disciples followed him. 40 On reaching the place, he said to them, “Pray that you will not fall into temptation.” 41 He withdrew about a stone’s throw beyond them, knelt down and prayed, 42 “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” 43 An angel from heaven appeared to him and strengthened him. 44 And being in anguish, he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat was like drops of blood falling to the ground.

45 When he rose from prayer and went back to the disciples, he found them asleep, exhausted from sorrow. 46 “Why are you sleeping?” he asked them. “Get up and pray so that you will not fall into temptation.”

Jesus Arrested

47 While he was still speaking a crowd came up, and the man who was called Judas, one of the Twelve, was leading them. He approached Jesus to kiss him, 48 but Jesus asked him, “Judas, are you betraying the Son of Man with a kiss?”

49 When Jesus’ followers saw what was going to happen, they said, “Lord, should we strike with our swords?” 50 And one of them struck the servant of the high priest, cutting off his right ear.

51 But Jesus answered, “No more of this!” And he touched the man’s ear and healed him.

52 Then Jesus said to the chief priests, the officers of the temple guard, and the elders, who had come for him, “Am I leading a rebellion, that you have come with swords and clubs? 53 Every day I was with you in the temple courts, and you did not lay a hand on me. But this is your hour—when darkness reigns.”

Peter Disowns Jesus

54 Then seizing him, they led him away and took him into the house of the high priest. Peter followed at a distance. 55 And when some there had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and had sat down together, Peter sat down with them. 56 A servant girl saw him seated there in the firelight. She looked closely at him and said, “This man was with him.”

57 But he denied it. “Woman, I don’t know him,” he said.

58 A little later someone else saw him and said, “You also are one of them.”

“Man, I am not!” Peter replied.

59 About an hour later another asserted, “Certainly this fellow was with him, for he is a Galilean.”

60 Peter replied, “Man, I don’t know what you’re talking about!” Just as he was speaking, the rooster crowed. 61 The Lord turned and looked straight at Peter. Then Peter remembered the word the Lord had spoken to him: “Before the rooster crows today, you will disown me three times.” 62 And he went outside and wept bitterly.

The Guards Mock Jesus

63 The men who were guarding Jesus began mocking and beating him. 64 They blindfolded him and demanded, “Prophesy! Who hit you?” 65 And they said many other insulting things to him.

Jesus Before Pilate and Herod

66 At daybreak the council of the elders of the people, both the chief priests and the teachers of the law, met together, and Jesus was led before them. 67 “If you are the Messiah,” they said, “tell us.”

Jesus answered, “If I tell you, you will not believe me, 68 and if I asked you, you would not answer. 69 But from now on, the Son of Man will be seated at the right hand of the mighty God.”

70 They all asked, “Are you then the Son of God?”

He replied, “You say that I am.”

71 Then they said, “Why do we need any more testimony? We have heard it from his own lips.”

Listen:

What stands out to you in this chapter?
Is there anything you are hearing in a new way?
Jesus’ prayer of both desire for God to take away what is about to happen and His full willingness to submit to God’s plan regardless of the cost teaches us how to pray.  Consider what, in your life, may call for this type of prayer.

Pray:

That God would protect the unity of Hopkins Community Church.
For the person/family you’re inviting to join you for worship on Easter Sunday.
Don’t forget to spend time listening as well!


Lent Day 42: Luke 22:24-38

Read: Luke 22:24-38

A dispute also arose among them as to which of them was considered to be greatest. 25 Jesus said to them, “The kings of the Gentiles lord it over them; and those who exercise authority over them call themselves Benefactors. 26 But you are not to be like that. Instead, the greatest among you should be like the youngest, and the one who rules like the one who serves. 27 For who is greater, the one who is at the table or the one who serves? Is it not the one who is at the table? But I am among you as one who serves. 28 You are those who have stood by me in my trials. 29 And I confer on you a kingdom, just as my Father conferred one on me, 30 so that you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom and sit on thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel.

31 “Simon, Simon, Satan has asked to sift all of you as wheat. 32 But I have prayed for you, Simon, that your faith may not fail. And when you have turned back, strengthen your brothers.”

33 But he replied, “Lord, I am ready to go with you to prison and to death.”

34 Jesus answered, “I tell you, Peter, before the rooster crows today, you will deny three times that you know me.”

35 Then Jesus asked them, “When I sent you without purse, bag or sandals, did you lack anything?”

“Nothing,” they answered.

36 He said to them, “But now if you have a purse, take it, and also a bag; and if you don’t have a sword, sell your cloak and buy one. 37 It is written: ‘And he was numbered with the transgressors’; and I tell you that this must be fulfilled in me. Yes, what is written about me is reaching its fulfillment.”

38 The disciples said, “See, Lord, here are two swords.”

“That’s enough!” he replied.

Listen:

What stands out to you in this chapter?
Is there anything you are hearing in a new way?
In what ways do we strive to be the best?  How would Jesus look at these pursuits?  What can we learn from Jesus’ teaching here about what makes someone truly “great” in God’s Kingdom?

Pray:

For the lost in the Hopkins community to come and know Christ as Savior and Lord.
For the person/family you’re inviting to join you for worship on Easter Sunday.
Don’t forget to spend time listening as well!


Lent Day 41: Luke 22:1-23

Read: Luke 22:1-23

Judas Agrees to Betray Jesus

22 Now the Festival of Unleavened Bread, called the Passover, was approaching, and the chief priests and the teachers of the law were looking for some way to get rid of Jesus, for they were afraid of the people. Then Satan entered Judas, called Iscariot, one of the Twelve. And Judas went to the chief priests and the officers of the temple guard and discussed with them how he might betray Jesus. They were delighted and agreed to give him money. He consented, and watched for an opportunity to hand Jesus over to them when no crowd was present.

The Last Supper

Then came the day of Unleavened Bread on which the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. Jesus sent Peter and John, saying, “Go and make preparations for us to eat the Passover.”

“Where do you want us to prepare for it?” they asked.

10 He replied, “As you enter the city, a man carrying a jar of water will meet you. Follow him to the house that he enters, 11 and say to the owner of the house, ‘The Teacher asks: Where is the guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?’ 12 He will show you a large room upstairs, all furnished. Make preparations there.”

13 They left and found things just as Jesus had told them. So they prepared the Passover.

14 When the hour came, Jesus and his apostles reclined at the table. 15 And he said to them, “I have eagerly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer. 16 For I tell you, I will not eat it again until it finds fulfillment in the kingdom of God.”

17 After taking the cup, he gave thanks and said, “Take this and divide it among you. 18 For I tell you I will not drink again from the fruit of the vine until the kingdom of God comes.”

19 And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.”

20 In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you. 21 But the hand of him who is going to betray me is with mine on the table. 22 The Son of Man will go as it has been decreed. But woe to that man who betrays him!” 23 They began to question among themselves which of them it might be who would do this.

Listen:

What stands out to you in this chapter?
Is there anything you are hearing in a new way?
Jesus knew that Judas would betray Him and yet He called Judas as a disciple anyway.  Why do you think that is?  What does that teach us about those people in our lives who betray us?

Pray:

That God would use Hopkins Community Church in a unique way to reach the greater Hopkins community.
For the person/family you’re inviting to join you for worship on Easter Sunday.
Don’t forget to spend time listening as well!


Luke 24 – Emmaus

Read Luke 24

The narrative of the Road to Emmaus is unique to the book of Luke and sets the stage for Jesus’ post-resurrection appearances.  It also shows us a very particular way that God reveals Himself to us in the person of Jesus Christ through the celebration of the Lord’s Supper.  It was in the moment in which Jesus broke the bread that His true identity is revealed to the two men that were with Him.  We believe that this continues to be true when we come to the Table of Our Lord.  When we eat the bread and drink the juice, Jesus is revealed to us in a unique and mysterious way.

There is another thing that is happening in this story that is really special; it is a narrative of those who are searching for answers and finding them in God’s Word which is the revelation of God and points to Jesus Christ as the true Messiah and Savior.

These two men are walking a road from Jerusalem, after seeing and hearing all of what happened in Jesus’ death.  The implication here is that they are part of those who followed Jesus and were at least somewhat familiar with Him.  But they are also confused about what just happened.  Sometimes this is true with us as we see God at work in our lives; we don’t truly understand it.

Yet Jesus appears, not miraculously and powerfully to chastise them for their questions, but instead comes along side them and joins in their conversation, gently and purposefully revealing Himself through the teaching of Scripture.  God is not afraid of our questions or our faith struggles; He directs us through the Holy Spirit to the true and certain revelation of who He is and His love for us in Scripture.



Luke 23 – Stark Reality

Read Luke 23

The series of events that directly leads to Jesus death include at least two hearings of a judicial nature,a beating, torture, a death march, the act of crucifixion, and the process of dying which took hours.

Crucifixion is the most horrific way ever invented to kill a human being. Jesus death took that to an entirely new level. Most people didn’t actually survive a flogging much less a march down main street after being flogged.  It makes the term “cruel and unusual punishment” looks like a warm summer day at the park.

As cruel as all of this seems, there is a deeper reality that we don’t often think of when it comes to this: Jesus did this for us while we were still sinners.  Sometimes we who believe in Jesus do not realize this, having found our Savior and experienced His grace, but Jesus died for those who don’t believe too.

This, my friends, is the true depth of God’s love for us; Jesus died so that anyone and everyone would always have the possibility of salvation, even if they never come to know Him.  The true beauty in this self-sacrificial death is that the act itself is not dependent on a decision from us, but rather it creates the possibility of a decision for all, whether they take it or not.

While it may seem of little consequence to those longing for loved ones to come to know Christ, it is important to remember that the fact they can even consider the question of “who Jesus is” comes from the stark reality of what Jesus did.  Like a parent who loves a child, even in the midst of rejection, so God loves us and always leaves the porchlight on for those who want to come home.



Luke 22 – Take this Cup

Read Luke 22

The theme of blood, which seals covenantal promises, is one that runs throughout the whole of Old Testament Scripture and shows up here in the image of the cup.  As Jesus shares His last supper, He offers up the bread, His body, and the cup, which is the “new covenant” that is sealed in His blood.  Jesus offers this knowing what is about to come.

I have always found it interesting though that Jesus also prays in the garden, after the dinner, that God would take this cup from Him.  It is not as though Jesus was unwilling, ultimately He prays that God’s will would be done over His.  But Jesus knows the price for the sealing of any covenant: blood.  As all of the Jewish sacrificial traditions point to, the simple fact is that something must die so that another could live.

Later in the book of Romans, Paul writes that “the wages of sin is death,” and this is abundantly true.  All the way back in Genesis, God tells Adam and Eve that, should they disobey and eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, they would surely die.  When they did, all of humankind was destined to the same fate.

It isn’t just physical death we are talking about, but spiritual death as well; permanent separation from God, our creator.  This is not God’s desire.  In fact, Paul writes in Ephesians that, because of God’s great love for us, Jesus died for us even while we were still sinners.

God knew that we could not create our own way back to Him, so He made a way for us in Jesus Christ. We celebrate this when we “take the cup” at the Table of our Lord when we celebrate and remember together.



Luke 21 – How Long?

Read Luke 21

The other morning I was sitting with my newborn baby daughterwatching the news while she fell back asleep in my arms.  As we rocked my attention passed between her and the news of the day.  I don’t remember them exactly, but I know they were bad.  Coverage of a bombing, a hijacking, or some other such thing, and I wondered allowed, “how much longer can this go on?”

I didn’t really have an answer at the time until I read this, a reminder of things already covered in Matthew, yes, but a good reminder each and every day that we see things like this.  It is hard to not get calloused, to not become indifferent at this news.  All bad all the time and its hard to find any comfort in that.

Certainly, as those who are called to show the love of God, we need to be mindful of our reactions, especially to those who want to do us harm.  “Love your enemy,” Jesus says, “Do good to those who hate you;” “Pray for those who persecute you.”  Never are we to become inhospitible, even to those who would do us harm.

At the same time, though, it is important for us to not become indifferent to these injustices either.  It is easy to turn a blind eye to things that happen over-seas, but we are called to “mourn with those who mourn.”  So we pray for Paris, for Ankara, for Brussels, and every place marked by such violence.

Finally, it is important to remember this: God is still on the throne.  Jesus says here that “these things have to happen.”  While it is painful to watch so much violence, one thing is sure: the end is coming and Jesus will return to make all things right.



Luke 20 – Religious Authority

Read Luke 20

The moment Jesus’ authority is questioned shows up in both Matthew and Mark, and in all three circumstances, after putting them in their place, He speaks a warning about the religious leaders.  They may hold a high place in society, but, as the saying goes, with great power comes great responsibility.

Jesus’ comment at the end of his warning is telling, for those of us in places of authority, we will be judged “more severely.”  I’ve often wondered what this really means and what it looks like in today’s culture.

It is pretty clear throughout Scripture that those God calls to be leaders, those with knowledge and wisdom, are held to a higher standard.  Jesus shows us how we are to live into this through the model of humble service to one another and sharing God’s love and the good news of the Kingdom of Heaven to all He encountered.  When Jesus sends out the seventy-two and the twelve, He commands them and gives them authority in this way.

I wonder what Jesus would have to say about the leaders of our day.  Some go around touting their status as “reverend,” all the while stirring up trouble, division, and dissension in the name of religious rites, demanding perfection from some while excusing the sins of others.  Others find the use of vulgar speech and emotionally manipulative tactics to be the way to more power.  Sadly, almost every leader that we see in the news or seeking an office does less of the humble serving and much more of the “devouring” that Jesus mentions.

Leaders that say that we need to “help” and “serve” without showing it with their actions (or their pockets) should probably heed Jesus warning here.  Like the parables, when much is given, much is expected.