Jeremiah 1:4-12 "Living Witness"



Day 235: Jeremiah 50; Messages against the Nations (Part 3)

Like Isaiah, and many of the other prophets, Jeremiah also contains within it prophecy for judgment on Babylon, the Lord’s instrument.  I’m sure it seemed like the empire of Babylon was too great to be moved, unable to be defeated, but there is nothing that is too great for God to do.  The nation of Babylon was raised up by God for the purpose dispensing judgments to the nations.  However, they were by no means a nation that was without sin.  In fact, the nation of Babylon was incredibly sinful, worshiping false gods and even misusing the articles of the Temple of God that they had plundered.  Jeremiah’s message here makes sure that the people of God understand that not even Babylon, the great empire of the world, would be able to escape the judgment of God.  No amount of military or economic influence would be able to stay the judgement that was to come on them.

At the risk of sounding repetitive, I think that this is a very clear message not just to the people of Israel, but to all who read these words.  In my context as a writer, I think of my own country and the decline in moral values and a culture that is… well… corrupt and lacking in solid moral values.  People feel that they can do whatever they want because we are “murica,” the strongest nation in the world.  We have the best stuff and the most of it as well… yet not even a world power like America can stand before the judgment seat of God.

The Church of North America must serve in some ways, like the prophets of Israel did as well.  We have a message given to us by God, one of repentance and salvation.  There is much to be said about what is going on in the country today, things that are contrary to the design and desire of God.  Sin runs rampant and is increasing more and more each day.  We cannot sit idly by and stay silent in the midst of this lest we too be included in God’s judgment.  As Christians, we must stand up in the face of sin, and speak truth into the brokenness of society, not for our own personal gain, but because God has given us a message or restoration through Jesus Christ.  We must place our hope in Him, for He is the only Way to Salvation.



Day 234: Jeremiah 49; Messages against the Nations (Part 2)

Today we read the messages against Ammon, Edom, Damascus, Kedar and Hazor, and Elam.  This chapter has a similar ring to the last couple chapters and the next few as well.  My first thought about today’s reading was that we should just read it for what it is, the judgment against many nations for the sins they had committed.  I didn’t think that there was much else to say about it.  But as we read this, and yesterday’s reading as well, there are very specific traits that each of these cities and nations are being punished for, and each city and nation has a particular history with God and the nation of Israel.

The Ammonites worshiped other gods and sacrificed children to them.  Edom, the decendants of Esau, boasted in its wisdom and the strength of its city in Petra. They rejoiced at the fall of Jerusalem, only to see its own boarders fall only years later.  Aram, Kedar, Hazor, and Elam all were pagan cultures, likely worshiping a pantheon of gods and relying on their own strength and wealth rather than placing their trust in God alone.

I see bits and pieces of our culture in the United States here as I read this chapter.  We think we are wise and cunning at times, full of street smarts and crafty.  We often look to other things, leaders, or even money as that which can bring about our salvation, our strength, and our prosperity.  Yet none of this really amounts to a hill of beans before the Lord.  There is nothing in this world that is more powerful than God.  We may have the strongest military, the best technology, the greatest wealth, and even the smartest people, and yet all of that crumbles before the Lord, the God of the Universe.  We must keep in mind that it is God that has placed us where we are today, it is God who has empowered our nation, and it is in God whom we need to be placing our trust.  Before the Lord nations rise and fall, they are but a speck, a blip on the timeline of history.  Only by placing our hope and trust in the Lord can we find forgiveness and salvation.



Day 222: Jeremiah 12-14; Destruction We Deserve?

As all of Scripture is linked together and the whole of the Bible’s message is primarily the grace of God that we find in Christ Jesus and the salvation that is offered though Him by His death on the cross, I couldn’t help but think about the ruin and disaster that is being prophesied about here.  Jeremiah’s message of what is to come for the people of God is dire, even shocking at times.  We are not talking about a petty attack from the Philistines, or even a prolonged drought and famine, we are talking about complete and utter devastation on a scale that these people would scarcely understood.  Sometimes I think that the messages of these prophets about the coming judgment were received in the same way that Noah’s warnings about the coming flood would have been.  Apart from not wanting to hear such a negative forecast of the future, I’m sure that the people just found it plain hard to believe because of the enormity of how bad it would be.  I’m sure if we were to go back to the year 2000 and tell someone about 9/11 or hurricane Sandy, they wouldn’t believe it either because of the sheer magnitude of the disaster (not saying that those were judgments, just making a comparison).

Yet as I was thinking about this, I wonder if this is not exactly that, a prophecy of exactly what we as sinful humans deserve.  As I was reading yesterday and today there were a couple times where I thought he was pointing out that we just can’t help but sin, it is our very nature.  However, this is no excuse and because of our continual sinning, we deserve this judgment too.  We deserve nothing less than total destruction; exile from the blessings of God.  Yet we know, and Paul tells us in the second chapter of Ephesians that there is another narrative that is going on here as well, the narrative of grace:

And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience— among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind. But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved— and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.  For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God,  not a result of works, so that no one may boast.  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

Paul’s letter, though I doubt it was meant to be this, is a counter for us to the reality of what we deserve because of our sins, that which is described in detail here.  We live in a different reality though, the reality of salvation.  We do not need to fear the wrath of God on us because we have been washed in the blood of the lamb.  Our sins our atoned for and washed away.  Thanks be to God!