Closing Prayer: H.C. Lord’s Day 52

Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 52

Q 127: What does the sixth petition mean? 
A 127: “And do not bring us to the time of trial, but rescue us from the evil one” means:
By ourselves we are too weak to hold our own even for a moment.
And our sworn enemies—the devil, the world, and our own flesh—never stop attacking us.
And so, Lord, uphold us and make us strong with the strength of your Holy Spirit, so that we may not go down to defeat in this spiritual struggle, but may firmly resist our enemies until we finally win the complete victory.
 
Q 128: What does your conclusion to this prayer mean?
A 128: “For the kingdom and the power and the glory are yours forever” means:
We have made all these petitions of you because, as our all-powerful king, you are both willing and able to give us all that is good; and because your holy name, and not we ourselves, should receive all the praise, forever.
 
Q 129: What does that little word “Amen” express?
A 129: “Amen” means: This shall truly and surely be!
It is even more sure that God listens to my prayer than that I really desire what I pray for.
 
The closing of both the Lord’s Prayer and the teaching of the Lord’s prayer represent three things, a recognition of God’s presence in our daily walk, a reiteration of God’s sovereignty, and a trust in God’s faithfulness.
 
First comes the phrase “save us from the time of trial,” an update from the traditional “lead us not into temptation.”  The original texts of Jesus’ teaching on the Lord’s prayer were never meant to give a false indication that God is the one who either prompts or creates temptation.  God’s presence in the midst of our trials and temptations, however, is a gaurantee in Scripture.  He promises to never leave us or forsake us; He walks every step of our lives with us, sustaining us even when He doesn’t approve of our actions or the things we get ourselves into.  Even when we are clearly in over our heads, there is nothing that God cannot save us from.
 
When we find ourselves in the midst of these times, Jesus reminds us of two things.  First, that we are indeed not alone.  We are not caught in temptation because God has left us, but rather because we are walking away from Him.  Even then, however, when we are faithless, He is faithful.  And second, He reminds us that we can always call to Him when we are lost.  There is nothing that we can get ourselves into that discounts us from turning back to God and God receiving us with His full love and open arms.
 
Second in the closing phrases of the Lord’s prayer is a sort of reprise and a reminder of the whole purpose and goal of prayer in the first place.  Prayer is an act of worship, and through it, we see a transformation in us that prompts us toward desiring and enacting God’s will and purposes in the world.
 
This is also a declaration of the state of our hearts.  Saying, “The Kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours,” means that, for us, those things belong to God and as such they are not ours to control.  Rather, we are placing our trust once again in Him and recognizing Him for who He is: God.  
 
Finally, the prayer is ended by the word “amen.”  This word is not just a nice Christian word for “prayer done.”  It carries with a very real and very specific meaning: “this is sure to be!”  When Jesus is talking to His disciples about things that are sure to be, He says in the Greek “amen, amen,” or “truly, truly…”  The emphasis here points to the certainty of God’s actions in our lives and in the world.
 
Have you ever prayed and felt like your prayers were just bouncing off the ceiling?  Have you ever felt alone and not sure if what you were praying would even come to be?  The word “amen,” is a statement of trust.  We say this because we believe, deep in our core, that God hears and answers prayer.  In one of the closing statements of his book, Kevin DeYoung says this, “God is so gracious that He is more willing to hear our requests than we are sure that we actually want what we pray for.”  God’s desire that we come to Him, even in the midst of our doubts, is so great that we are assured that no matter the state that we are in, God will always here and answer. 
 
DeYoung finishes by saying this, “How Liberating!  Go ahead and pray to God better than you feel and you may just find that in His mercy you end up better than you deserve.”  How wonderful and true.  God is able and willing to do far more than we could ever ask or imagine, even at our best.  So the invitation of God is to come… no matter where you are or what is going on… go to Him!


Realizing Dependence: H.C. Lord’s Day 50

Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 50

Q 125: What does the fourth petition mean?
A 125: “Give us this day our daily bread” means:

Do take care of all our physical needs so that we come to know that you are the only source of everything good, and that neither our work and worry nor your gifts can do us any good without your blessing;

And so help us to give up our trust in creatures and trust in you alone.
 
 How often do you think about where your next meal is going to come from?  If you are like me, probably rarely.  Even if we don’t have any food in the house (which never actually happens), my family and I could go out to eat at one of any number of restaurants in a 20-mile radius.  We are pretty much never in danger of not having enough food.
 
Not being in danger of this, however, can be a danger in and of itself.  When we are in a place of abundance, a place where our own work seems to be enough for the provisions that we need, not to mention the wants that we often indulge, we far too often forget the true source and provider of all our needs, God the creator, sustainer, and provider for the entire universe.
 
Now, as we have discussed in the past couple of weeks, the catechism is not teaching some magical words that are going to get you more “blessed.”  Neither is it teaching that if you don’t say these things, God is going to somehow pull all of His blessings and provision right out from under you.  Jesus is teaching His disciples to pray and, as such, He is teaching them the importance of both the direction of their prayers and the recognition in their prayers.
 
Praying for the things that you already have seems a bit silly.  This is especially true when you’ve always had them.  Yet the danger in not including this in our prayer life is a plunge into total self-reliance.  Jesus is teaching His disciples to remember the true source of all things and the direction in which their trust should go.  For them this would be even more important in the years that followed Jesus Ascension into heaven, a time of intense persecution of the young Church.
 
Self-reliance, in the face of the trials and tribulations of life, may work for a little bit, but ultimately our strength and our hope come from something much greater than ourselves.  Christians have, far too often, encouraged each other by saying “hang in there” or “you are stronger than this.”  These are certainly good sentiments, but at their core is a very dark and dangerous desire: we want to be in control, we want to support ourselves, we don’t want to have to trust anyone else.
 
The reality for us, however, is that we need to put that trust somewhere else.  What we want is self-reliance but what we need is God-reliance.  This is why Jesus taught His disciples to have this as a vital part of their prayer life.  Excluding it could be a lapse in memory or a simple oversight; it could also reveal a sort of reality of a self-reliant heart that either doesn’t want to or doesn’t feel it needs to look to God for all our needs… even the ones that seem to be already met.
 
Have you ever been at a place in your faith journey where prayer seems to be of relatively little importance?  I know I have.  What is it that shakes you out of that?  Perhaps a crisis… a deep struggle… a significant life event…  We readily go to God when we recognize a need that we cannot meet for ourselves.  Jesus teaches us that, while God will always be there, we should readily go to God for everything, in everything, with everything.  Not only does God invite this, He longs for it!


Provision: H.C. Question 125 (Part 2)

What does the fourth petition mean? 
 
James 1:17 – Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.
 
Deuteronomy 8:3 – He humbled you, causing you to hunger and then feeding you with manna, which neither you nor your ancestors had known, to teach you that man does not live on bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord.
 
Psalm 37:16 – Better the little that the righteous have than the wealth of many wicked;
 
Psalm 127:1-2 – Unless the Lord builds the house, the builders labor in vain.  Unless the Lord watches over the city, the guards stand watch in vain.  In vain you rise early and stay up late, toiling for food to eat— for he grants sleep to those he loves.
 
1 Corinthians 15:58 – Therefore, my dear brothers and sisters, stand firm. Let nothing move you. Always give yourselves fully to the work of the Lord, because you know that your labor in the Lord is not in vain.
 
Psalm 55:22 – Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he will never let the righteous be shaken.

Jeremiah 17:5-8 – This is what the Lord says:

“Cursed is the one who trusts in man,
who draws strength from mere flesh
and whose heart turns away from the Lord.
That person will be like a bush in the wastelands;
they will not see prosperity when it comes.
They will dwell in the parched places of the desert,
in a salt land where no one lives.
“But blessed is the one who trusts in the Lord,
whose confidence is in him.
They will be like a tree planted by the water
that sends out its roots by the stream.
It does not fear when heat comes;
its leaves are always green.
It has no worries in a year of drought
and never fails to bear fruit.”

Hebrews 13:5-6 – Keep your lives free from the love of money and be content with what you have, because God has said,

“Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.”

So we say with confidence,
“The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid.  What can mere mortals do to me?”
 


Hallowed Name: H.C. Question 122 (Part 2)

What does the first petition [hallowed be your name] mean? 
 
 
I will exalt you, my God the King;
I will praise your name for ever and ever.
Every day I will praise you
and extol your name for ever and ever.
Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise;
his greatness no one can fathom.
One generation commends your works to another;
they tell of your mighty acts.
They speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty—
and I will meditate on your wonderful works.
They tell of the power of your awesome works—
and I will proclaim your great deeds.
They celebrate your abundant goodness
and joyfully sing of your righteousness.
The Lord is gracious and compassionate,
slow to anger and rich in love.
The Lord is good to all;
he has compassion on all he has made.
All your works praise you, Lord;
your faithful people extol you.
They tell of the glory of your kingdom
and speak of your might,
so that all people may know of your mighty acts
and the glorious splendor of your kingdom.
Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom,
and your dominion endures through all generations.
The Lord is trustworthy in all he promises
and faithful in all he does.
The Lord upholds all who fall
and lifts up all who are bowed down.
The eyes of all look to you,
and you give them their food at the proper time.
You open your hand
and satisfy the desires of every living thing.
The Lord is righteous in all his ways
and faithful in all he does.
The Lord is near to all who call on him,
to all who call on him in truth.
He fulfills the desires of those who fear him;
he hears their cry and saves them.
The Lord watches over all who love him,
but all the wicked he will destroy.
My mouth will speak in praise of the Lord.
Let every creature praise his holy name
for ever and ever.


The Eighth Commandment: H.C. Question 110 (Part 2)

What does God forbid in the eighth commandment? 
 
Psalm 15:5 – who lends money to the poor without interest; who does not accept a bribe against the innocent.  Whoever does these things will never be shaken.
 
Proverbs 11:1 – The Lord detests dishonest scales,  but accurate weights find favor with him.
 
Proverbs 12:22 – The Lord detests lying lips, but he delights in people who are trustworthy.
 
Ezekiel 45:9-12 – “‘This is what the Sovereign Lord says: You have gone far enough, princes of Israel! Give up your violence and oppression and do what is just and right. Stop dispossessing my people, declares the Sovereign Lord. You are to use accurate scales, an accurate ephah, and an accurate bath. The ephah and the bath are to be the same size, the bath containing a tenth of a homer and the ephah a tenth of a homer; the homer is to be the standard measure for both. The shekel is to consist of twenty gerahs. Twenty shekels plus twenty-five shekels plus fifteen shekels equal one mina.
 
Luke 6:35 – But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be children of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked.
 
Luke 12:15 – Then he said to them, “Watch out! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; life does not consist in an abundance of possessions.”
 
Ephesians 5:5 – For of this you can be sure: No immoral, impure or greedy person—such a person is an idolater—has any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God.
 
Proverbs 21:20 – The wise store up choice food and olive oil,  but fools gulp theirs down.
 
Proverbs 23:20-21 – Do not join those who drink too much wine or gorge themselves on meat, for drunkards and gluttons become poor, and drowsiness clothes them in rags.

Luke 16:10-13 – “Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches? And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else’s property, who will give you property of your own?  “No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money.”



The Greatest Question: H.C. Lord's Day 23

Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 23

Q 59. What good does it do you, however, to believe all this?
A 59. In Christ I am righteous before God and heir to life everlasting.

Q 60. How are you righteous before God?
A 60. Only by true faith in Jesus Christ.

Q 61. Why do you say that through faith alone you are righteous?
A 61. Not because I please God by the worthiness of my faith. It is because only Christ’s satisfaction, righteousness, and holiness make me righteous before God, and because I can accept this righteousness and make it mine in no other way than through faith.

Having now spent a vast majority of our time in the Heidelberg Catechism unpacking the Apostles’ Creed and its meaning, we now hopefully have a better understanding of what we mean when we say “I believe in ____.”  This week the follow-up question are as vitally important as they are starkly jarring: So what?

We now have a head knowledge of the Apostles’ Creed; we may even be able to say it from memory, big deal.  What does that get us?  The answer is equally as important: salvation.  If we believe all of this we are united to Christ and made right in God’s sight thus receiving the gift of eternal life.

But what exactly does this mean?  Today we will talk about this using the terms “Faith” and “Justification,” and we will use Romans 3:21-28 as our guide:

But now apart from the law the righteousness of God has been made known, to which the Law and the Prophets testify. 22 This righteousness is given through faith in Jesus Christ to all who believe. There is no difference between Jew and Gentile, 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 and all are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus. 25 God presented Christ as a sacrifice of atonement, through the shedding of his blood—to be received by faith. He did this to demonstrate his righteousness, because in his forbearance he had left the sins committed beforehand unpunished— 26 he did it to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time, so as to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus.

27 Where, then, is boasting? It is excluded. Because of what law? The law that requires works? No, because of the law that requires faith.28 For we maintain that a person is justified by faith apart from the works of the law.

As Christians, we often say that for one to be saved they have to “put their faith” in Jesus.  How does this happen, though, and what does it look like?

First, we have to understand what faith is.  Faith is believing that something is true and right.  In Scripture, we are told that faith is a result of the working of the Holy Spirit in our hearts to direct it toward Jesus Christ.  Faith, then, is the vehicle through which we receive salvation.  Romans 10:10 says, “For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.”

What does it mean to be “justified?”  It means that, through the work of Jesus Christ we are made right in God’s sight.  there are a couple of important implications here:

  1. Justification does not mean perfection.  We are still sinners in this life.  On this side of heaven, we will always be the “sinning saints” or “righteous wretches.”  Putting our faith in Jesus, being justified through His blood does not imply a perfect life from that point on.
  2. Justification means that we are made right in God’s sight.  This means that God doesn’t see our old, sinful self anymore.  Instead, He sees the mark of His Son.  This is known as “alien righteousness,” referring to the fact that our righteousness is not from us, it comes from Jesus.  There is nothing we contribute to our own salvation.
  3. Justification, on a related note, also refers to “imputed righteousness.”  This means that, when we place our faith in Jesus Christ and, through God’s grace, are justified before Him, righteousness is credited to us.  We are not “made holy” or “infused with goodness” in the sense that we somehow possessed it in ourselves and then Jesus unlocked it.  The righteousness that is are is credited to us.
  4. Justification comes through FAITH ALONE.  This has historically been an issue in the church for some reason.  Perhaps we will always have trouble letting go of the notion that we have to do something to earn this.  It is human nature to want to win our way to the top.  However, Scripture makes it very clear, in no uncertain terms, that justification happens when we put our faith in Jesus.  Yes, a transformed life is definitely a result of this faith.  However, it is once again important to note that we contribute nothing to our salvation but our own sin and have no merit before God except for Christ’s.

Through faith, we are justified.  Though Christ’s work, righteousness, merit, and grace are the key components of salvation, faith is both necessary and instrumental in our salvation too.  It is so, because of the object of our faith: Jesus Christ.  This is an important distinction to make as we come to the close of this portion of the Heidelberg Catechism.  Faith is important, yes, but faith does not save you; Jesus saves you.  We do not have faith in our faith, we have faith in Jesus.  Sometimes this can be confusing.  Faith is the way in which we embrace Christ, but even our ability to trust Him can ebb and flow.  God, however, is faithful and when we rest in Him we can be assured that He will never leave us or forsake us.



Jesus the Savior: H.C. Lord's Day 11

Q 29. Why is the Son of God called “Jesus,” meaning “savior”?
A 29. Because he saves us from our sins, and because salvation should not be sought and cannot be found in anyone else.

Q. Do those who look for their salvation in saints, in themselves, or elsewhere really believe in the only savior Jesus?
A. No. Although they boast of being his, by their actions they deny the only savior, Jesus.

The Apostles’ Creed is divided up into three parts: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.  Within those divisions, the lion’s share of the Heidelberg Catechism’s emphasis and work is placed on Jesus.  Two Lord’s days are given to God the Father, one is given specifically to the Holy Spirit, though it’s actually three if you count the whole ending section, eight are given to Jesus, the first three of which will be spent simply unpacking what His name means and why it is important.

First, we will look specifically at the name “Jesus” which means, when translated from its Hebrew form, “savior,” or “God saves.”  In the time of the New Testament, when Jesus was born, lived, and died, there is much evidence that points to the fact that the name “Jesus” was a rather popular name.  It was, perhaps, the 4th most popular name for boys at that time.  Everyone probably knew a “Jesus” of some sort; it would have been the name where you had one or two in every classroom.

So why did God pick such a common name for His incarnate Son?  When I think back to how we came to choose the name we did for our daughter, the impact of the name was not necessarily found in its popularity, though we wanted something unique, but in the meaning that was behind the name.  Her name means “God has answered” and her middle name means “hope.”  Our prayer is that she will always know that God not only answers us when we call, but He has given us the ultimate answer in Jesus Christ, in whom all our hope is found.

As I said a moment ago, the name Jesus comes from the Hebrew name Yeshua (or Joshua) which means “Yahweh saves.”  In fact, Moses renamed Hoshea (which means “salvation”) to Joshua; this was the man that would lead the Israelite campaign to conquer Canaan.  It was an important distinction to make at that time that it was not Joshua, aka. Hoshea, who brought about the fulfillment of God’s covenant, but God Himself working through Joshua.

“Although Jesus,” writes Kevin Deyoung, “was a common name, with Jesus of Nazareth the name took on added significance.  It didn’t just mean that His God saves; it meant that He was the God who saves.  Jesus of Nazareth is the only one who can save us from our sins.”  Salvation can be found nowhere else.

There are a couple of important points that are made here, some explicitly and others implicitly:

First, Jesus saves us from our sins.  The Bible doesn’t cast Jesus as a self-help guru who comes to make us feel better about ourselves, make it possible to find a mate through His supernatural online dating site, or get us the dream job we want but won’t work for.  The work of Jesus Christ, through His life, death, and resurrection, does all that we cannot do ourselves in wiping away our sins and making us right with God once again.  Understanding our identity in Christ can lead to such things as a better self-image and confidence in who we are, yes, but it is not the sole purpose of His work.

Second, this is work that He alone can do and His continued work as the mediator between us and God is also solely His.  We do not pray to saints or other spiritual figureheads.  The Bible does not affirm religious greats that have come before us as those who are able to dispense spiritual brownie points for God if we remember them, give money toward them, or light a candle in their honor.

Finally, the Heidelberg Catechism also uses a rather convicting phrase in its talk about Jesus as the sole source of salvation stating that we should not look for our salvation in ourselves either.  I often hear very well-intentioned people tell others they just need to “push through” or “buck up” when the going gets tough.  Christians give the impression to others that you have to “look within” or “summon the strength inside” to not only get through hard times but also when it come to deal with addiction, pain, abuse, disease, and any number of maladies in this life.  We do not look to ourselves for our salvation and, while the premise of encouragement may indeed be well-intentioned, it may also accidentally be suggesting that the “strength within” is greater than that of the loving, providing, sustaining, creator God who never leaves us or forsakes us.

When it all comes down to it, we need to think back to the beginning of this journey.  What is our only comfort in life and in death?  “That I belong, body and soul, in life and in death, to my faithful savior Jesus Christ.”  This Lord’s Day is a direct application of this and it, once again, involves trust.  It is hard to say that we trust someone because it means that we are no longer trusting ourselves with that thing.  The reality, though, for salvation, is that there is no “both-and,” it is an “either-or.”  As Kevin DeYoung concludes, “Either Jesus is the only Savior, the perfect Savior, and your only comfort in life and in death, or Jesus is, for you,” just another feel good religious item in your life.

Thanks be to God that He is patient with us, merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.  Though we are often untrusting and unfaithful, He is always faithful to us.



Only Jesus? H.C. Question 30

Do those who look for their salvation in saints, in themselves, or elsewhere really believe in the only savior Jesus?

1 Corinthians 1:12-13 – What I mean is this: One of you says, “I follow Paul”; another, “I follow Apollos”; another, “I follow Cephas”; still another, “I follow Christ.”

Is Christ divided? Was Paul crucified for you? Were you baptized in the name of Paul?

Galatians 5:4 – You who are trying to be justified by the law have been alienated from Christ; you have fallen away from grace.

Colossians 1:19-20 – For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.

Colossians 2:10 – and in Christ you have been brought to fullness. He is the head over every power and authority.

1 John 1:7 – But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus, his Son, purifies us from all sin.

Psalm 146:3-5 – Do not put your trust in princes, in human beings, who cannot save.  When their spirit departs, they return to the ground; on that very day their plans come to nothing.  Blessed are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the Lord their God.



It's all in the Plan: H.C. Lord's Day 10

Heidelberg Catechism Lord’s Day 10

Q 27. What do you understand by the providence of God?
A 27. The almighty and ever present power of God by which God upholds, as with his hand, heaven and earth and all creatures, and so rules them that leaf and blade, rain and drought, fruitful and lean years, food and drink, health and sickness, prosperity and poverty—all things, in fact, come to us not by chance but by his fatherly hand.

Q 28. How does the knowledge of God’s creation and providence help us?
A 28. We can be patient when things go against us, thankful when things go well, and for the future we can have good confidence in our faithful God and Father that nothing in creation will separate us from his love.  For all creatures are so completely in God’s hand that without his will they can neither move nor be moved.

One of the chief characteristics of God that we hold to be true is His sovereignty over all of Creation.  Essentially, this means that we believe that God has power and authority over all of what He has created, and He exercises that power and authority to bring about His will in the world.  For some, this makes God appear to be more like a dictator, especially if their experience of life has been substantially harder.  We start to ask questions like “why did God make this happen to me?” or “What did I do to deserve this.”

If God is a dictator, however, He certainly is a benign and loving one.  Perhaps, in this instance, the language that the Heidelberg Catechism uses is much better and more appropriate for the discussion.  The writers talk about God’s sovereignty in terms of “providence,” the root word of which is of course, “provide.”  This offers a much more appropriate context for God’s ruling and works in the world.  God is indeed love, and Scripture says that God is working out all things for the good of those who love Him.  We also know that God is actively working to bring restoration to the world which will culminate in Christ’s return and the setting right of all things.  In addition to this, we also know that God is patient, not wishing that any would perish, but providing ample time for people to turn to Him because of His great love for us.

The language of the questions and answers in Lord’s Day 10 can be a bit uncomfortable, though, as well; “all things come from [God’s] hand.”  All things?  Really?  Something about that makes us cringe on the inside.  It’s definitely easier to blame sin, satan, or our own foolish acts for some of the difficult times in life that we experience.  Certainly, our difficulties can come from those things, but Scripture is clear that “all things come from God’s hand,” which means that even if the difficulties we face are a result of a spiritual attack from the satan himself, it is under the direction and purview of God’s power and will.

Let’s be clear about a couple things, though, as we talk about God’s providence.  This is not an excuse to act foolishly or sinfully, only to blame the results on God.  Scripture affirms human responsibility when it comes to the results of actions in our lives, hence the need for a Savior.  The Bible is also clear that temptation to sin does not come from God, which would also allow us to blame God for sin.  But there are seemingly negative things in our lives that do find their source in God in some way.  God is sovereign over creation, over nations and rulers, over both good people and bad.  God has sent trouble and calamity, destroyed nations and people groups, and even hardens the hearts of some.  He uses all of the created order to work His will in the world and His plans cannot be thwarted.

So what does this mean for us?  Should we be scared and living in fear of a God who can do anything at any time just because it pleases Him?  No.  I don’t think so.  When we understand God in human terms, we often think of the worst case scenario.  If we give a ruler too much power, He/She can do whatever they want without any check or balance.  God is not like that.  All of God’s power is exercised in love, as a loving parent exercises loving authority over their children for their benefit.

Lord’s Day 10 is very clear about how this benefits us as well.  When things seem to be going against us, we can be patient knowing that God is working His will and that God is always working for the good of those who love Him.  Think of Joseph or even the Israelite slavery in Egypt, both seemed profoundly negative at the time.  Out of those events, however, great things came to be.  This does take a profound amount of trust, something we have and will continue to talk about here.  These are the times when our faith is tested; they are also the times when God does some of His deepest work in us.

We can also be thankful when things go well, remembering that all good and perfect gifts come from God.  How often do we stop to thank God when we’ve had a good day, a successful meeting, a positive experience with a friend, or anything else for that matter.  It is easy for us to run to God in the bad times, but do we do so in the good times as well?

Finally, we can have confidence in the future knowing that, even if all of our worries and fears come true, God will never leave us and He is always working out His perfect will.  God’s ways are higher than our ways, and He is far above all rule and authority on this earth, but He is always with us and always ready to listen.  We can face the future unafraid because we know that nothing moves except by the hand of God.



Hebrews 11:1-3 "Faith is…"