Day 197: Isaiah 1-3; Introduction to the Prophets

Yesterday we closed out the section of the Bible known as the Wisdom literature.  In that time we had taken a step back from the overall story of Israel and had jumped into a wholly different genre of Biblical literature.  Even though these were different, and not necessarily all directly connected to the grand narrative of redemptive history, we did find that they were certainly well linked with it.  Today we begin the final section of the Old Testament: The Prophets.  In this section we will jump back into the story of Israel, though the people we will be reading lived at different times within the history of Israel from roughly the time the Kingdom split up to and even during the time of Exile for Judah.  The books are not necessarily in chronological order and it is fair to say that some of these prophets were likely working at the same time, perhaps even in the same places.

Bible Timeline Photo Credit: www.relevancy22.blogspot.com

Bible Timeline
Photo Credit: www.relevancy22.blogspot.com

Most of the writings of the prophets are focused on calling the people back from their sins, to repent and return to God.  The office of prophet, instituted by Samuel, the last of Israel’s judges, is one that serves in a similar way to the priest, but is also very different.  The prophet serves, in many ways, as the mediator between God and the people.  Some would say that the prophet functions as the mouth of God.  Where as the priest would make intercession between the people and God, the direction of this being primarily upward, the prophet was in many ways the mediator between God and people, a primarily downward direction.  Some prophets, like Isaiah, served in both rolls, both prophet and priest as it is very likely that Isaiah himself was the high priest in the Temple.

Even as we read these chapters today we can see that the message of Isaiah is not necessarily one that would make him a super popular guy among the general populace.  Their messages tend to emphasize the negative, the sinful disobedience of Israel.  While people, even today, like to hear messages about God’s love and forgiveness, when those messages are made in the same thought as the judgment that God was going to pour out on the people if they don’t repent, the overall tone of the message is seen as negative.  And that is the thing about the prophets, this is what tended to happen.  Again, you can see this already modeled in the first three chapters.  What do you remember from reading it?  Likely it is that you remember the negative things, the judgment and destruction, not the love of God or the piece on the mountain of the Lord being established.

However, like the Lament Psalms that we encountered a couple weeks ago, there isn’t a single prophet in the Bible that ever speaks of judgment without hope.  There isn’t any prophet that speaks of the wrath of God without talking about God’s love and holiness.  These things that were destined to happen if the people didn’t repent were always trumped by the hope that was also there both in repentance and in what God was going to do after judgment came.  What the prophets are saying is that there is a time when God’s patience would run out and they would be punished for their sins.  What these same prophets are not saying is that once that time comes they no longer have hope.  Indeed there is a great thing to hope for, and it was testified and prophesied about throughout the period of the Old Testament, and that was the coming of the Messiah.  Isaiah testifies to it here in Isaiah 2, and He and most of the other prophets will indeed bring good news of a coming savior that would make things as they should be.  Though none that heard Isaiah’s words would have lived to see their true fulfillment in Jesus Christ, the hope of the coming Kingdom of God would have been well in their minds, even if they chose to focus more on the negatives of the coming judgment.  We will be with Isaiah for the next three weeks or so, and then on the Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the rest.  The section of the prophets is the one of the longest section in the Bible, contains the most information about the coming Messiah prior to the New Testament, and in many ways helps us to better understand what God is up to in redemptive history, His true Holiness and wrath against sin, and His true and unconditional love for His people.


9 Responses to “Day 197: Isaiah 1-3; Introduction to the Prophets”

  1. glane8029 says:

    Love your Post, you are a real student of the Bible, Very God post

  2. Jon VanderWall says:

    Thank you! It has been so great to be doing this through the Bible! I am learning so much about God and the union of the Scriptures and how everything fits together!

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