Day 164: Psalms 55-60; More on Praying, Lamenting, and Justice

Today’s reading is all about praying prayers of lament.  Each and every one of these Psalms is lamenting something, and though they were likely songs as well, these are definitely prayers to God about things that were going on in David’s life.  What strikes me about these prayers is the diversity of things that David is bringing to the Lord and the diversity of situations that these psalms encompass.  Its no secret that David was in trouble a lot during the first part of his life, but what seems to also be a constant for him is the fact that in all things he goes to God for help.

Prayer Requests

Prayer Requests

I find this interesting and striking not because I don’t go to God with some my problems, nor that I think God is unable to handle my problems, but mostly because I don’t know that I often practice what I believe when it comes to going to God and trusting in God through all the things of life.  If we look at these psalms and place them alongside all of the other songs and prayers of lament that are written in the psalms, we see very quickly that when it comes to having a problem in life, the model for us is to go directly to God with it.  What we see is a humble, trusting, hope filled servant of God living his life openly and transparently before God.  David in particular is quick to praise, quick to thank, and quick to bring his laments before God.  What we do not see is a whiny complainer than just comes to God if and when he has a problem.

As we talked about a couple days ago, this is often how we view God; a sort of cosmic vending machine if you will.  We insert our prayers and out pops divine help.  While I can’t say that this particular form of prayer won’t elicit help from God almighty, I do know that God desires more from us than simply asking for His help when we have a problem that we can’t solve on our own.  God desires a relationship with us; one that is open and honest through the roller coaster of life’s emotions.  As we have seen in this model that is set forth by David’s own life, the man that is described ans being “after God’s own heart.”  Again, He is quick to praise, quick to thank, and quick to lament.  Its certainly not that we shouldn’t bring our concerns before God.  In fact Scripture says in Philippians 4 that we should bring all things before the Lord:

 “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice.  Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand; do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.  And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Prayer

Prayer

A quick note about Imprecatory (praying for justice on one’s enemies/evil) prayer:  David also gives us a model for what appropriate imprecatory prayer is.  Each of the Psalm today have an imprecatory quality towards them.  In the wake of 9/11 and with all of the horrific things that are going on in the world with bombings, war, violence, etc. I think that we hear very often that we should be more concerned with praying for our attackers and forgiving the evil people than we should be praying for justice to be done.  Let me first say that it is not wrong and is in fact very appropriate to pray for forgiveness of an aggressor or an enemy, and even to pray that they come to know the forgiveness and saving love of Jesus Christ.  However, as we see here, it is also not wrong to pray for justice and David shows us an appropriate way to do just that.  David doesn’t pray out of a motivation for vengeance or out of some personal grudge against someone he just wants to see get their dues, he prays for God’s justice to be done.  God’s justice is perfectly just and comes without malice or contempt.  God does not punish in rage or hatred, but out of love and the desire that one would learn and come to know Him.  Even Jesus, as He taught His Disciples to pray, taught them to pray for God’s Kingdom to come, a Kingdom in which true justice shall reign.

So if you are going to pray an imprecatory prayer, take a moment and check yourself.  It is perfectly ok to desire justice and peace on earth, but be sure that your prayers are not motivated by any selfish thoughts or emotions.  Rather, ask God that His justice would come and that His Kingdom would come on earth as it is in Heaven.  I leave you with the next verses of Philippians 4 as food for thought:

Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you.

PSALM 55-60 are all prayers of Lament written by David that are both imprecatory and didactic in nature.


5 Responses to “Day 164: Psalms 55-60; More on Praying, Lamenting, and Justice”

  1. […] Day 164: Psalms 55-60; More on Praying, Lamenting, and Justice (orcministries.wordpress.com) […]

  2. […] ← Day 164: Psalms 55-60; More on Praying, Lamenting, and Justice June 14, 2013 · 6:00 AM ↓ Jump to Comments […]

  3. […] Psalm 55:22 – Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he will never let the righteous be shaken. […]

  4. […] Psalm 55:22 – Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he will never let the righteous be shaken. […]

  5. […] fully to the work of the Lord, because you know that your labor in the Lord is not in vain.   Psalm 55:22 – Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he will never let the righteous […]

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